henry romero

reuters.com
Archaeologists discover Aztec ball court in heart of Mexico City
The remains of a major Aztec temple and a ceremonial ball court have been discovered in downtown Mexico City, shedding new light on the sacred spaces of the metropolis that Spanish conquerors overran five centuries ago, archaeologists said on Wednesday.

Raul Barrera, an archaeologist from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) speaks to the media about new Aztec discoveries including the main temple of the wind god Ehecatl, a major deity, as well as an adjacent ritual ball court, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017. REUTERS/Henry Romero

Raul Barrera, an archaeologist from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) shows to the media a new Aztec discovery a ritual ball court, during a tour of the area, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017. REUTERS/Henry Romero

A new Aztec discovery of the remains of the main temple of the wind god Ehecatl, a major deity, is seen during a tour of the area, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017. REUTERS/Henry Romero

Diego Prieto, director of the Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) speaks to the media during a news conference about new Aztec discoveries including the main temple of the wind god Ehecatl, a major deity, as well as an adjacent ritual ball court, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017. REUTERS/Henry Romero

A new Aztec discovery of the remains of the main temple of the wind god Ehecatl, a major deity, is seen during a tour of the area, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017. REUTERS/Henry Romero

A model of the major structures of the ceremonial precinct of the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan, including the temple to the wind god and ball court, as seen outside the ruins of the Templo Mayor in downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017. REUTERS/Henry Romero

A new Aztec discovery of the remains of the main temple of the wind god Ehecatl, a major deity, is seen during a tour of the area, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017. REUTERS/Henry Romero

Raul Barrera, an archaeologist from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) speaks to the media about new Aztec discoveries including the main temple of the wind god Ehecatl, a major deity, as well as an adjacent ritual ball court, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017. REUTERS/Henry Romero

Eduardo Matos Moctezuma, an archaeologist from Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) speaks to the media during a news conference about new Aztec discoveries including the main temple of the wind god Ehecatl, a major deity, as well as an adjacent ritual ball court, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017. REUTERS/Henry Romero

The remains of a major Aztec temple and a ceremonial ball court have been discovered in downtown Mexico City, shedding new light on the sacred spaces of the metropolis that Spanish conquerors overran five centuries ago, archaeologists said on Wednesday.

The discoveries were made on a nondescript side street just behind the city’s colonial-era Roman Catholic cathedral off the main Zocalo plaza on the grounds of a 1950s-era hotel.

The underground excavations reveal a section of what was the foundation of a massive, circular-shaped temple dedicated to the Aztec wind god Ehecatl and a smaller part of a ritual ball court, confirming accounts of the first Spanish chroniclers to visit the Aztec imperial capital, Tenochtitlan.

“Due to finds like these, we can show actual locations, the positioning and dimensions of each one of the structures first described in the chronicles,” said Diego Prieto, head of Mexico’s main anthropology and history institute.

Archaeologists also detailed a grisly offering of 32 severed male neck vertebrae discovered in a pile just off the court.

“It was an offering associated with the ball game, just off the stairway,” said archaeologist Raul Barrera. “The vertebrae, or necks, surely came from victims who were sacrificed or decapitated.”

Some of the original white stucco remains visible on parts of the temple, built during the 1486-1502 reign of Aztec Emperor Ahuizotl, predecessor of Moctezuma, who conquistador Hernan Cortes toppled during the Spanish conquest of Mexico.

Early Spanish accounts relate how a young Moctezuma played against an elderly allied king on the court and lost, which was taken as sign that the Aztec Empire’s days were numbered.

The building would have stood out because of its round shape among the several dozen other square temples that dominated the Aztecs’ most sacred ceremonial space before the 1521 conquest.

Aztec archaeologist Eduardo Matos said the top of the temple was likely built to resemble a coiled snake, with priests entering though a doorway made to look like a serpent’s nose.

Once excavations finish, a museum will be built on the site, rubbing shoulders with modern buildings in the capital.

Mexico City, including its many colonial-era structures with their own protections, was built above the razed ruins of the Aztec capital, and more discoveries are likely, Matos said.

“We’ve been working this area for nearly 40 years, and there’s always construction of some kind … and so we take advantage of that and get involved,” he said.

5 True Crime-y Movies I love that no one has heard of

The Cell - A serial killer is found comatose, with his last victim still alive but being held in a slowly filling water tank at an unknown location. To find her, the police enlist a psychologist who has a machine enabling her to go inside the killer’s mind. The art direction is the best thing about this movie, provided by the late Eiko Ishioka.

Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer - Based loosely on Henry Lee Lucas and Otis Toole, a pair of convicts go on a killing spree. Things get complicated when Otis’ sister comes to stay with them, and she becomes smitten with Henry. Gruesome, bleak, and violent, this is the most realistic depiction of a serial killer I’ve ever seen.

Dark City - A man wakes up in a hotel room’s bathtub with no memory of who he is or how he got there. His doctor calls to tell him there are people looking for him and he must run, but the call is interrupted when the man finds the mutilated corpse of a prostitute next to his bed. Make sure to watch the director’s cut; the theatrical version spoils the twist in the first few minutes. There’s a sci fi element to it as well as crime noir, but that’s what makes it so unique.

M - In pre-Nazi Germany, a child killer terrorizes a city. When the police are unable to catch him, the city’s criminal underground takes matters into their own hands. It’s black and white, all the dialogue’s in German, and it has no musical score, because it was made in 1931, but it’s the movie that made horror icon Peter Lorre famous and boy is it good. Can be found in HD on YouTube, since it’s now in the public domain.

Martin - Young Martin has come to stay with his elderly, superstitious cousin, who insists Martin is a vampire. The cousin’s granddaughter doesn’t believe it, of course, but then she didn’t see him break into the cabin of a woman on the train, drug her, slit her wrist with a razor, and drink her blood. Is Martin really a creature of the night, or is he just sick? Extremely low budget film from 1978 made by none other than George Romero is virtually impossible to find on DVD, but several versions are on YouTube in varying degrees of low quality (and aspect ratio). Still worth it if you can stand the horribly ugly 70’s decor.

I am pretty sure there should be spin off related to the chimera pack and their background and they are all alive and we’d get to see their families but also their struggles and friendship and relationships and we need this

Teen Wolf doesn’t deserve Theo Raeken and the Teen Wolf Fandom doesn’t deserve Cody Christian, so I think the Chimera Pack Spin-off should be made by Netflix, with all the same actors and characters of the Chimera Pack, but with different names, so all the wank can stay away from our occasionally homicidal Chimera Babies.

Garbage collectors, with their horse and cart, unload rubbish at the municipal dump in Nezahualcoyotl, on the outskirts of Mexico City, February 18, 2015. Hundreds of horse or donkey-drawn carts will disappear from the streets of a municipality in the state of Mexico, located on the outskirts of Mexico City, and will be replaced by motorized vehicles, local authorities said.

REUTERS/Henry Romero