henriette-browne

The Reading Lesson. Henriette Browne (French, 1829-1901). Oil on canvas.

With a basket of books and papers at her side, the one girl gives an informal lesson in reading to the girl to her left. The younger child has dropped a book and is taking a nap, likely in preparation for the school day.

flickr

Henriette Browne - Girl Writing [c.1870] by Gandalf’s Gallery

Henriette Browne was the pseudonym for Mme Jules de Saux, née Sophie Boutellier (1829-1901). She specialised in genre scenes, especially Near-Eastern and religious subjects, as well as portraits. She also worked as an engraver. She started exhibiting at the Salon in Paris in 1853 and exhibited at the Royal Academy, London, between 1871 and 1879. This painting is a fine example of Henriette Browne’s output as it combines a genre scene, a little girl distracted while doing her homework and a child portrait. The interest in everyday life and close observation of nature is characteristic of the French Realist movement emerged in the 1840s.

The bird’s cage can be construed as a metaphor for the imposed homework while the fact that it is opened alludes to the possibility of escaping such task by distraction. Birds in general are a symbol of freedom and goldfinches in particular enclose a Christian meaning as they embodied the soul of man that flew away at his death. Goldfinches were once a favourite pet with children thanks to his handsome plumage. In this regard, it is most likely that the present painting corresponds with the one entitled The Pet Goldfinch exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1875.

[Victoria & Albert Museum, London - Oil on canvas, 74 x 92 cm]

flickr

Henriette Browne - Girl Writing [c.1870] by Gandalf
Via Flickr:
Henriette Browne was the pseudonym for Mme Jules de Saux, née Sophie Boutellier (1829-1901). She specialised in genre scenes, especially Near-Eastern and religious subjects, as well as portraits. She also worked as an engraver. She started exhibiting at the Salon in Paris in 1853 and exhibited at the Royal Academy, London, between 1871 and 1879. This painting is a fine example of Henriette Browne’s output as it combines a genre scene, a little girl distracted while doing her homework and a child portrait. The interest in everyday life and close observation of nature is characteristic of the French Realist movement emerged in the 1840s. The bird’s cage can be construed as a metaphor for the imposed homework while the fact that it is opened alludes to the possibility of escaping such task by distraction. Birds in general are a symbol of freedom and goldfinches in particular enclose a Christian meaning as they embodied the soul of man that flew away at his death. Goldfinches were once a favourite pet with children thanks to his handsome plumage. In this regard, it is most likely that the present painting corresponds with the one entitled The Pet Goldfinch exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1875.

[Victoria & Albert Museum, London - Oil on canvas, 74 x 92 cm]

L'estate sta finendo. Le vacanze sono belle e concluse. Rimettiamo mano, testa e cuore nei nostri libri, quaderni e supporti digitali.

Il quadro è di Sophie de Bouteiller (1829–1901), pittrice francese più conosciuta (si fa per dire) con il suo pseudonimo di Henriette Browne.

Da notare che la gabbia è aperta, un uccellino è sul tavolo, un altro se ne sta appartato in un angolo, mangia e sembra osservare la ragazza, ma non scappa.

Che vorrà dirci Sophie?

Fan art of Henriette ‘One Eye’ Cooper from the Sly Cooper franchise. She’s probably my favourite Cooper ancestor. I’ve made her fur nearly white because I feel that she had distinctly lighter fur than the other Coopers and if Riochi can be a brown raccoon, Henriette can sure as hell be white. :)

Character © Sucker Punch Productions