help save bees

how to help sick bee!!

is bee on ground? is bee not moving much?? is bee tired??? help sick bee!!!

  • use paper to pick up bee!
    slide slowly under little bumbly legs and little bumbly body until bee is fully on paper

  • bring bee inside to open window or open door!!!
    when bee is better, bee will fly out!

  • make sugar water for bee!
    mix two (2) to three (3) tablespoons of sugar (can be normal sugar or organic sugar! no artificial, no diet sweetener, no sweetener, just sugar!!!!! no honey either!!!!!!) with one (1) tablespoon of water! stir until sugar dissolves!!!!

  • put sugar water on plate or spoon for bee!
    give to bee! put bee on clean parts of plate or hold spoon near bee! if bee gets stuck in sugar water, use paper to help them get unstuck!

  • let bee drink and rest!!!!!

  • can put a bowl / plate / container of sugar water outside for other bees!!!!! use same two to one (2:1) or three to one (3:1) ratio for mix!!!!!

“Plant These to Help Save Bees: 21 Bee-Friendly Plants” by Hannah Rosengren, 2013.

Hello tumblr! I’m re-posting this now since originally posting it last fall because while it’s been so exciting to see this illustration shared so many times on tumblr, twitter, facebook, instagram, etc- the credit has more often than not been lost along the way or removed. It’s great to see people advocating for the bees but frustrating to see a post with thousands of shares and no credit. Always, always credit the artist when posting images online- and if you’re not sure who it is, take one minute to look it up. It makes a huge difference.

journal ideas 2.0 🌻
  • my imaginary mini garden/terranium: step up your flower and plant art doodle and make a garden or terranium instead!
  • quick ways on how to save the bees: let this dedicated page serve as a constant reminder that you must help in saving the bee population
  • how do i plant my *insert plant here: i have this page called how i plant my sunflowers and it may also double serve as my seed count recorder. quick suggestion: do it in numerical bullet form
  • my pet profile: this is absolutely adorable if you make one for every pet that u have and add a little box where u can doodle em
  • soothing notes to self: one-liner reminders in bullet form to read and write regularly for a healthy heart
  • monthly goals: step up your monthly goals game by making mini squares and doodling your goals in every box instead of the old bullet way!
  • mini paintings: of absolutely anything: your pets, flowers, whatever that inspire the monet in you
  • pressable mini sentimental things: tickets, candy wrappers, tea packs, cute tags, book marks, mini notes, old stickers, stamps, flowers, leaves, petals, etc
  • what i love about today: write it down. like the old times. no need to doodle stuff, just narrate your day because there’s nothing better than raw stories.
  • what’s in my backpack: quick illustration of the stuff u have inside your jansport, kanken, whatever u bring in school or anywhere else!
  • my skincare routine: i dont actually have this page but it feels like a good addition because it’s a way of reminding myself that i have to care for my skin
  • small gestures of self-love: things that i plan to do for myself for optimal self-love!! more like a plan?
  • little things that i should do more often: things that you are going to do in the near future to live your life to the fullest and help you grow and become a better person
  • sunshines in a bottle: make mini bottles and paint each bottle with your very own version that reminds you of the good things that happened to you this week or month maybe!
  • the go-to art materials: an illustration + list of my favorite art materials that i use almost everytime! i wanted to add this page because it helps you organize your brushes or something
  • the coffee stars: rate and maybe even sketch the coffee shops that you’ve been to for the past few weeks! dedicate maybe 3 or 4 pages max for better effect!
  • weekly mantra: what is your chant for this week? write it down and make it look like art (i.e: through calligraphy, etc)
  • popcorn n flix: a movie + snack favorite list that should be done once a month!
Master Post

I went through my blog and found some posts that I thought were useful. There’s not a lot yet, but I’ll keep my resource page updated

Witch Tips/Witchcraft 101

Spells/Potions

Divination

Herbalist Related/Etc

Kitchen Witchcraft

Hellenic Polytheism

Deities/General Polytheism

What she says: I’m fine
What she means:

I’m outraged that an average bee’s lifespan is only 2 weeks. That’s 14 days. In those 14 days, the bee movie had the bees get an education for 9. 3 days of elementary school, 3 days of high school??? 3 days of college?????? The bee has already lived over half of their life. Barry should have died within the first 40 minutes of the movie since he time progressed somewhat rapidly. Also, in those 2 weeks he would have only produced half a tablespoon of honey!!!! Meaning, 4 bees died to make those teaspoons of honey you put in our tea. It’s outRAGEOUS.

So, you’ve come across a bumble bee on the ground. It’s moving lethargically, or not at all (a small, very gentle poke will determine if she’s dead or not). So how do you save her, and make sure she lives to pollinate another day?

First of all, make sure you get her off the ground. I used an index card, but any old piece of paper will do! Next, in a spoon, mix some warm water with sugar, making sure it dissolves a little bit. Put the water near the bees mouth, or, if you screw up like I did, spill a bit on the paper in front of them. She will hopefully use her proboscis and start drinking it up! After she drinks her fill, she will hopefully perk up a bit. At this point, take her outside and plop her on a flower. She will hopefully recover here and fly back to join her sisters in the hive for the night!

And that is how you help save a bee! This little lady is doing well, and will hopefully keep doing her part in making the flowers bloom! This has been a PSA from your local bees rights activist 🐝

the-viking-god-of-awesome  asked:

I know bees don't sting unless you go messing with them, and I certainly try to avoid ticking them off and try to live with then peacefully. But I also know that accidents happen from time to time, so I was wondering if you know some good home remedies for bee stings

Great question! For sure, it happens.

For non-serious stings, there’s a bunch of great remedies.

Honey

Honey is great for wound healing, pain as well as itching. To do so, apply a bit of honey to the area, cover it with a loose bandage and leave it there for up to an hour.

Baking soda

Baking soda paste made with water is great to neutralize the bee venom, because yes, bee venom is acidic on the pH scale! This will help with the pain, itching and swelling. Apply a thick layer to the area, cover with a bandage and leave it there for 15 minutes. Re-apply when necessary. 

Toothpaste

For some reason, toothpaste is a great helper for bee stings. Dab a bit on the affected area!

Meat tenderizer

Papain, an enzyme in meat tenderizer, apparently helps break down the protein that causes pain and itching. A solution of one part meat tenderizer, four parts water will simply do the trick. Apply for up to 30 minutes. 

Wet aspirin tablet

Very popular! Helps reduce the pain and swelling, also helps with wasp stings. Do it with ice though.

Herbs and oils

These herbs are great to heal wounds:

Hope this helped! And remember, if it gets serious, make sure you contact a doctor.

Foodie Friday: Healing in the Kitchen

Servings: Varies

Ingredients:

-1 tbsp peppermint leaves (about one tea bag)
-1 tbsp chamomile (about one tea bag)
-½ tsp cinnamon
-½ tsp ginger
-¾ cup boiling water
-¾ cup honey (raw local honey is recommended)
-Optional: Powdered sugar, Powdered vitamin C, or Cornstarch for dusting

1. Steep your herbs in the boiling water for about 10 minutes, then strain and save the tea.

2. In a small saucepan, combine the tea and honey and heat to a gentle boil over medium heat.

3. Continue boiling until the mixture reaches a temperature of about 300 degrees Fahrenheit. Keep careful watch, as honey can burn very easily.

4. Take off of heat and allow the syrup to cool for about 5-10 minutes.

5. Transfer syrup onto parchment paper in small spoonfuls (recommended teaspoon) and allow to cool to room temperature.

6. If desired, dust the lozenges with powdered sugar, powdered vitamin C, or cornstarch. This will absorb moisture, keeping the lozenges dry and preventing them from sticking in storage.

Note: The consistency of the lozenges may vary. There are several factors that play into this, including water loss, honey quantity, temperature variation, and weather.

Magical Ingredient!

Here in California, we’ve been blessed with some lovely rains! And while it’s absolutely wonderful to see the green come back after five long years of drought, it does come with a few downsides. The first is that mosquito populations boom. The second is that erosion issues that we hadn’t anticipated are cropping up all over the place. And the third is that with more moisture also comes a new rash of cold and flu.

Kitchen witchcraft is not limited to delectable dinner dishes. Nor is it limited to baking or crafting culinary delights. It is also very practical and encompasses herbal remedies that can be worked in the home. And so, it seemed right to share a recipe for homemade throat lozenges. All of the ingredients are tools of the kitchen witch, from the water to the tea, but of all of the ingredients, one stands out: honey.

Last week, we covered various alcohols and how liquor has been a staple of human consumption for most of human history, but honey mead is one of the primary drinks that come to light in that topic. In addition, honey has been a natural sweetener that humanity has loved since the dawn of time, even reaching a state where its presence represents prosperity and happiness (”land of milk and honey,” anyone?), and even wealth due to its golden color.

This image of wealth is further ingrained when considering the hard work put in by honeybees to produce honey, followed by their ferocity in protecting it when the hive is low on stores. Much like how one would work hard to acquire or earn wealth, and then protect their money when it’s been obtained.

Honey is, by far, one of the most cherished ingredients for its antibacterial properties and its natural sweetness. It is a natural preservative, and is far healthier than sugars due to its chemical makeup. In addition, it is an ingredient that has helped make many much more environmentally aware…

Domesticated honeybees (from which we get most of our honey) will produce close to 80 pounds of surplus honey per year, which is why beekeeping has been such a successful trade for so many centuries. In the late summer, beekeepers will remove wooden frames from the hives on which the surplus honey is stored (contrary to popular belief, the majority of beekeepers harvest honey in non-invasive ways which don’t stress the colony, and never harvest the stores the bees require for survival). This honey and the comb are then separated, processed (in some cases), and made ready for sale. By the time it reaches the plastic bottle as a clear golden syrup, it’s been pasteurized (depending upon the country’s health regulations) and processed.

From the store, one can pick up either processed or “raw” honey, which contains trace amounts of pollen from the nectar the bees had used to make it. This makes raw honey an excellent way of bolstering the immune system against the symptoms of seasonal allergies, in addition to the other traits honey has.

Honey’s composition is roughly 17 percent water, with most (not all) of the rest being natural sugars. As a result, if any bacteria, fungi, or molds try to settle on it, the water contained within them gets pulled out, killing them and preventing honey from spoiling. In addition, depending upon the flowers that the bees had pollinated, the nectar could have additional antibacterial properties (manuka honey, for instance, is particularly good at this and is used as an antibacterial in hospitals). Our ancestors recognized the healing properties of honey, and would add it to poultices and other remedies that would be applied directly to wounds, much as we would with Neosporin today.

From the witchy perspective, there really isn’t anything to dislike about honey. First, there’s its color, which is excellent for wealth and prosperity spells. Second, there is its healing properties, which are excellent for both remedies and for healing spells. Third, is its sweetness, which can serve to enhance the sweetening spells, and makes it an excellent offering to fairies and gods alike! Pairing they variant of honey with your purposes adds a whole new level of magic to your craft, as well! For instance, if you want to encourage prosperity and luck, use clover honey; alternatively, if you want to use honey for cleansing and healing, use rosemary honey instead!

A less common thought when it comes to using honey in magic is to incorporate its creator into the work. Bees are tireless workers, often inspiring bee enthusiasts and beekeepers alike, and it’s their effective communication and work ethic that can be incorporated into spellwork involving honey. If you need a spell to encourage productivity and energy, honey is a great go-to ingredient due to the bees’ tireless efforts. 

Like any ingredient, intent is key: channel your intent and energy into the honey before adding it to food or drink, or before adding it to a sweetening jar. If you’re making an offer of honey, consider what it may represent to the deities or spirits that it is meant for.

Lastly, another reason many witches appreciate honey is as I had mentioned above: it has helped increase environmental awareness. With bee populations struggling, it is important to consider ways to help “save the bees.” More specifically, save the environment. Honeybees are most well known to us, but they aren’t the only kind of bee present in our lives. Many species don’t produce honey but are integral to pollination. What makes them less noticeable is their subterranean nests throughout most of the year. Many witches feel a deep respect for the earth and for all animals, and bees are not alone in this. Consider switching from sugar to honey in most recipes to help bring honey’s properties into your life while helping fund further developments in beekeeping, and be sure to thank  the bees in your life for their hard work and inspiration!

May all your meals be blessed! )O(