help! (film)

Dating Amy would include

Originally posted by snork-iplier

-Late night random talks.

-A lot of coffee dates.

-Helping her when filming little things for her channel.

-She’s a blanket hog in bed.

-She’s the Mom in the relationship, always making sure you’re sleeping and eating.

-She’ll ask you to join her for late night adventures.

-She’ll take your hoodies and pants.

-She’ll try teaching you cool things with editing but it never works out because you get distracted.

-You both are always swapping music to listen too.

-She gets this twinkle in her eyes anytime she talks about aliens and things, that makes your heart flutter.

-She’ll do your eyeliner if you can’t get it right.

-She’s always dragging you to art museums to check out stuff.

-She’ll sneak random photos of you when you’re laughing or sleeping.

-You randomly hug her from behind and she always jumps.

-Your smile gives her this warm feeling that makes her blush.

-Sometimes if you’re sad and don’t want to talk about it, she’ll have you lay on her lap and plays with her hair.

-You accompany her to concerts even if you don’t like them.

-She’s sometimes like to be the big spoon, but most of the time she’s the little spoon.

-When you go on special dates her face is so full of love when you come down the stairs in a beautiful outfit.

-She loves posting photos of you and her on every social media platforms.

-She’s your girlfriend but also your best friend.

5

Maybe they’ll save it. All the pieces. Store it in the town hall attic and rebuild it in a hundred years. Wonder who the hell we were. 

Riverdale, “Chapter Four: The Last Picture Show”

Call Me By Your Name (2017) dir. Luca Guadagnino

Summer of 1983, Northern Italy. An American-Italian is enamored by an American student who comes to study and live with his family. Together they share an unforgettable summer full of music, food, and romance that will forever change them.

telegraph.co.uk
Viola Davis reveals she has 'a lot of issues' with her 2011 civil rights drama The Help
Viola Davis has spoken out about problems she had with The Help, the Civil Rights drama that won her an Oscar nomination in 2012, criticising the decision to sanitise the pain of the era in which it was set by leaving many of the film's tougher, more dramatic scenes on the cutting room floor.

Extremely important to read and consider, especially as The Help was so highly regarded as a progressive landmark in Hollywood for African-American women - though not necessarily by them.

“I absolutely love the premise,” she said. “I love the fact that [Emma Stone’s character] said ‘I am going to write a story from the maids’ perspective of what it feels like to work with these white women’. Operative term meaning the maids’ perspective. I don’t feel like it was from our perspective, that’s the problem I had with it. I had it from the very beginning.

While she criticised aspects of the film she felt to be historically inaccurate (including the maids rejecting money for their stories, despite the film depicting them struggling to find scraps for food), she mostly condemned the sanitising of pain in order to make the film more palatable to mainstream audiences.

“The anger, the vitriol, and the hatred that they would have towards these white women if they were asked, if they were put in a situation where they were isolated, would have been vocalised. You didn’t see none of that!”

Lionsgate and Saban went out and found five unknown actors with either little or no acting experience (in movies) because a) they want to start a franchise with them and more importantly b) because they wanted their movie to be diverse. And the actors were all amazing. So people can no longer use the excuse of Hollywood only casting white actors because they’re well-known and good actors or because it’s hard to find good non-white actors. It isn’t that hard and Power Rangers showed us that. Hollywood just prefers casting white people in main roles and in non-white roles.

anonymous asked:

Do you have any tips for composition?? I'm a beginner on that and I really love the way you do it

thank you! (again ive never had any real training in any of this) but i would say! know your basic composition rules/template things- golden ratio, golden spiral, etc, first of all. For me personally, i draw a lot of wide open spaces/backgrounds so MOST of my composition are rule-of-thirds ( i really should try the spiral more often). 

second, think about line balances/unbalance. it’s about the mood you want to set. for example, with the first drawing i wanted a very laid-back tranquil mood, so i wanted a sense of balance with my composition with the upward slope of one hill being canceled out with the downward slope of the second. for the second one, however, i wanted some energy, so i sought to create an upset with the lines.

third, i’d consider color balances/ imbalances. colors have SO much say in where your eye travels around the picture (and also im a color FREAK). you can use darker colors to frame a picture if your piece feels too big and empty and you want the focus to narrow down without actually making the canvas smaller:

if you want the viewer’s eyes to just travel around the picture and take the whole thing in, distribute colors evenly throughout the canvas. (sorry it’s so messy, but you get the point) think about the distribution of hue, saturation, and darkness/lightness.

if you want them to focus on that ONE thing, you can concentrate saturation, brightness, warmness etc to make the area pop. i used all three in these drawings!

also! @genicetea has some NEEAATT stuff on drawing the viewer’s eye and contrasts and composition on her twitter so if you want something that actually makes sense go there!

hope that helps a little! and sorry for the long post but you all should really expect that by now :’)