3

The Statement Reads as Follows:

“I accepted the role unaware that the character in the original comics was of mixed Asian heritage,” Skrein explained in his statement. “There has been intense conversation and understandable upset since that announcement, and I must do what I feel is right.”

“It is clear that representing this character in a culturally accurate way holds significance for people, and that to neglect this responsibility would continue a worrying tendency to obscure ethnic minority stories and voice in the Arts. I feel it is important to honour and respect that. There I have decided to step down so the role can be cast appropriately.”

“Representation of ethnic diversity is important, especially to me as I have a mixed heritage family. It is our responsibility to make moral decisions in difficult times and to give voice to inclusivity. It is my hope that one day these discussions will become less necessary and that we can help make equal representation in the Arts a reality.”

"I am sad to leave Hellboy but if this decision brings us closer to that day, it is worth it. I hope it makes a difference.”

“With love and hope,”

“Ed Skrein”

This not only shows that actors have a say in what roles they take, but also that what they do in such situations showcases their true integrity.

I feel like it’s not acknowledged or appreciated nearly enough that Hellboy is a book about a demon summoned to Earth by a mad Russian scientist using Nazi super tech in order to win World War 2 and bring about the apocalypse and instead of being a grimdark edgefest, Hellboy is just a big kid who really likes pancakes and his favorite superhero is an idiot named Lobster Johnson and one of his best friends was a homonculus who couldn’t wear pants.

hollywoodreporter.com
Ed Skrein Exits 'Hellboy' Reboot After Whitewashing Outcry
"Representation of ethnic diversity is important, especially to me as I have a mixed heritage family," the actor wrote in a statement one week after he joined the film.

“I accepted the role unaware that the character in the original comics was of mixed Asian heritage.

It is clear that representing this character in a culturally accurate way holds significance for people, and that to neglect this responsibility would continue a worrying tendency to obscure ethnic minority stories and voice in the Arts. I feel it is important to honour and respect that. There I have decided to step down so the role can be cast appropriately.”

(cont.)

Ed Skrein is not an A-list actor.  Yes, he has more money than most of us, but he’s not sitting on piles of Scarlett Johansson cash or Tilda Swinton money.  I’ll admit that I do tend to be less upset when a lesser-known white actor takes a role that wasn’t originally written for a POC because I’m an artist and I know a lot of artists and I see that life where you don’t really know when you’ll get your next callback or your next check.  I’m still angry, but way less mad than when someone with tens of millions of dollars steps into a role that has been whitewashed for “box office” reasons.

By that same notion, I’m a lot more impressed when a lesser known actor does what’s right.  When you’re not a household name, stepping into a widely known slice of pop culture is a big boost to your career, so good for Skrein sending this boost on toward an Asian actor it rightfully belongs to.

This is how you do it, White Hollywood.  When you know better, you’re supposed to do better.