hekat

How to dress store bought candles.

For those of you that don’t make your own candles you can still do something a little special for the store bought ones.

I get my 7 day candles from the 99cent store. Before using them for any spell work you need to make sure that you clean and cleanse them. I like to make a solution of salt, water and lemon essential oil spray it on a cloth and clean the glass and the top of the candle. This part is extremely important. You don’t want some 99 cent store workers energy on the candle not forgetting all the 100′s of people that might have picked it up and put it back :-p 

The candles that I made today are to be used on my altar for Hekate. This candle is pretty basic. If I was doing a spell candle I would write names, actions or something like that on the glass.

Remember, while you are dressing your candle concentrate on your intention for the candle. Thinking about what you’re gonna cook for dinner while making it will tarnish the affect.

What you need

  • Candles
  • Oils (I’m using homemade Hekate oil)
  • Screw or stick (For the holes)
  • Herbs
  • Cotton swab

Step one

Clean your candles and tools

Step Two

Take the screw or stick and pierce holes into the top of the candle. I use a pretty big screw so that I can go all the way down to the bottom of the candle.

Step Three 

Use a dropper to put one drop of oil into the hole. Then use the cotton swab to spread the oil through-out by dipping it in the hole. 

*If you don’t have a dropper you can cover the tip of the cotton swab and coat the inside that way*

*When working with oils, Less is more. The first time I ever used oil on a candle I covered the top with tons of it and it set on fire lol. So be careful!!!*

Step Four

Place small amounts of your chosen herbs over the holes and then use the cotton swab to push them inside. You can add as much of the herbs as you wish, it’s just easier to push down if you do small amounts at a time. I have in the past put small chip crystals down the holes too.

*Some witches add a layer of herbs to the top of the candle. I don’t do that with these ones because I leave them burning for a while and I don’t want the herbs to catch fire while I’m in another room*

Step Five

Once you have finished your candle it’s time to activate it. Some people write a spell or a blessing to say as they light it. Others say their intent for the candle out loud. Find the right way for you.

For this candle I say a little prayer (that I wrote) to Hekate and let her know that these candles are dedicated to her.

Thank you for reading

Brighest Blessings

Rachael-Elizabeth

xx

hekate · goddess of magic and witchcraft

Hekate was the goddess of magic, witchcraft, the night, moon, ghosts and necromancy. She was the only child of the Titanes Perses and Asteria from whom she received her power over heaven, earth, and sea. Hekate assisted Demeter in her search for Persephone, guiding her through the night with flaming torches. After the mother-daughter reunion became she Persephone’s minister and companion in Haides. Hekate was usually depicted in Greek vase painting as a woman holding twin torches. Sometimes she was dressed in a knee-length maiden’s skirt and hunting boots, much like Artemis. In statuary Hekate was often depicted in triple form as a goddess of crossroads.

Common Misconceptions About the Goddess Hekate

Many of these misconceptions can be very popular, but have no historical backing.

-She is a “crone goddess”
This misconception probably comes from more recent literary representations of her. In Ancient Greek religion she was always portrayed as a young maiden.

-She is a “triple goddess” or the Triple Goddess
The Triple Goddess is a purely modern creation/belief. This concept of deity was created in the mid 1900s along with Wicca. Since Hekate predates Wicca and neo-pagan movements by about 2,000 years, she couldn’t really be the Triple Goddess. She is not a Wiccan deity, so therefore, she would not be defined or characterized by a Wiccan concept of deity. While she is commonly portrayed as three women, that was only to depict her domain over the three way crossroads, unlike the Triple Goddess whose aspects each represent a different thing.

-Hekate is not a witch goddess
This is so far from true. Even if this role isn’t one of her original roles, such as the ones described by Hesiod, this aspect did become quite prevalent later in the Hellenic world. The evidence of her role as a witch goddess is very commonly portrayed in Ancient Greek literature and mythos. Kirke and Medea, arguably two of the most popular witches ever, were both priestesses, or in some cases daughters, of Hekate. Whenever witches performed their magic such as necromancy, binding spells, curses, image magic, and other spells, they called on Hekate. This relationship between witches and Hekate is not only shown in Greek literature but in Roman literature as well such as the tale of the witch Erichtho is Lucan’s Pharsalia.

-Hekate is JUST a witch goddess
Though her role as a witch goddess is probably the most popular in literature and with neo pagans and Wiccans, this is far from her only aspect. As described by Hesiod, she was a goddess of the heavens, the earth, and the sea, and a child protector. She was also known to be a goddess of the crossroads and the dead. She guards the gates to the underworld and holds dominions over the daemones (spirits) and ghosts. She also later became a goddess of the moon and is celebrated every dark moon at her Deipnon.

-Hekate is evil
This is more of a modern literary misconception. The Ancient Greeks did not believe in gods of pure good or pure evil. Each deity had aspects of both. The power to create or destroy. To bless or to curse.

anonymous asked:

When you get time would you mind making a list for an altar to Medea and Hekate?

Hekate
- Torches
- Crossroad dirt
- Black dogs
- weasel
- Spirit photography
- Black Cloth
- Herbs and roots used in witchcraft
- Homemade salves
- Book or journal for incantations and recipes
- Oak wood
- Spirit communication tools
- Keys
- Bones
- Herbal teas
- Dagger
- Candles (Black, grey, dark purple, red)

(A lot these could double for medea depending on your intent)

Altar Ideas
Amphitrite - Aphrodite - Apollo - Ares - Artemis - Asteria - Athena - Demeter - Dionysus - Hades - Hebe - Hekate - Hemera - Hephaestus - Hera - Hermes - Hestia - Khione - Persephone - Poseidon - Selene - Zeus

Aesthetic Olympian Gods | Hecate

Hecate is the goddess of magic, witchcraft, ghosts and necromancy. She is the daughter of the Titanes Perses and Asteria. She helped Demeter guiding her through the night with torches as they were searching Persephone and Hecate is often shown holding two torches. Later she became Persephone’s companion.

Requested by @r3d-ruku5

  • I call to Hekate, who stands at the crossroad,
  • who stands at the city gate, who stands before
  • each family's home, to watch and to ward off evil.
  • Bearer of torches, leader of hounds, holder of keys,
  • daughter of the deep earth and the starry sky,
  • you tread upon the path less traveled; you walk,
  • with certainty and without fear, in the dark night,
  • in the wilderness, along roads most treacherous,
  • among those who skirt the edges of order.
  • Hekate, friend of women, protector of children,
  • you know the perils of all the worlds, goddess,
  • as each world is your realm to wander. Thus do you
  • hold safe the home, thus do you bar the door from all ill,
  • thus do you drive away the baneful and the false.
  • Hekate, compassionate goddess, I call to you.
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Persephone and Hekate  
Homeric Hymn 2 to Demeter 436 ff :
“[After Persephone was returned from the underworld to Demeter:] Then bright-coiffed Hekate came near to them, and often did she embrace the daughter of holy Demeter: and from that time the lady Hekate was minister and companion to Persephone.”


Hauntingly Grim Photoseries: Daniel Vazquez

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@hynpos2 week myth event → day 1 → favorite Greek/Roman deity HEKATE

Hekate or Hecate is a goddess in Ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding two torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She is variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.