hedonism

so you’re taking a philosophy class... now what?

Philosophy is intimidating. You probably think of Pluto and Socrates, and while they are a part of philosophy, there is so much more to it. The subject is foreign and hard for many, but once you get the hang of it, it can easily become one of your favorite classes. Here’s some tips to make these classes a bit easier:

What the flippidy-doo-da even is philosophy???

Philosophy is the study of why. Ethics, morality, reasoning, all fall under philosophy. There’s a bunch of sub-topics in philosophy, like hedonism (what determines what is good for us?), relativism (why do we have different morals from someone else?), morality (what is the difference between right and wrong?), and more!

What makes a philosophy class different from any other class?

In philosophy there is no right or wrong answer. Everything is relative, subjective, and opinionated. The answer is never “yes” or “no”. Philosophy is essentially a lot of questions, but not many answers.

What can I expect in a philosophy class?

Socratic. Seminars. They are everywhere in philosophy classes. These are very similar to debates in the sense that its a group/the whole class talking about a subject, but you’re not trying to persuade anyone or change anyone’s mind, you’re simply talking about it. In college, philosophy classes tend to be smaller (under 40 people) for this reason. But don’t let the idea of a Socratic seminar scare you away from taking a philosophy class. They aren’t that bad. Why? Because there is no right or wrong answer. You don’t have to worry about saying something wrong or sounding stupid because literally you can’t say anything wrong. And if the idea of talking to other stresses you out, just remember that your fellow class mates are in the same exact position as you are. 

What can I do to *succeed* in a philosophy class?

Know your argument. Typically in philosophy there are three “arguments” (similar to a debate…ish). The for, the against, and the somewhere in the middle. On all of my philosophy tests, all of the questions are the same. exact. thing. Here’s an example from my last philosophy exam:

What is Hedonism?

What is an argument for Hedonism?

What is an argument against Hedonism?

What is your opinion on Hedonism?

You need to know of both sides of an argument, but other than that, there’s no memorization. It’s all explaining and why. You’ll learn very quickly how do BS a paragraph.

Also, Crash Course - Philosophy will become your best friend in the world.

Types of people who would especially love philosophy classes:

- Like writing, debates, and is opinionated

- ENTJ, ESTP, ISFP, ENTP, INFJ, INTP

- Aquarius, Leo, Gemini, Sagittarius, Pisces


@samsstudygram , The So You’re Taking Series - Philosophy

3
  • Serialkiller motives. 

We can group the motivations of serial killers into three main types, which each include some pathologies ranging from a killer to another.

  1. The motivation that can be described as “psychotic”, often comes under psychoses, and also hallucinations. The killer says he is driven to kill by higher entities, including God or the Devil. They are often prey to schizophrenia, and pulse murders so often disorganized. As it was the case of David Berkowitz or even Richard Ramirez.
  2. The “moralistic” killer generally don’t suffer from psychosis or hallucinations, but has a very high opinion of morality, of right and wrong. They often see themselves as sporting a mission to eliminate what they consider immoral. Generally, prostitutes, homosexuals, etc. The famous Jack the Ripper is the most telling example.
  3. The serial killer that can be considered as “hedonist” gives a notion of intense pleasure to his murders. Violence, murder and domination of the victim is then about sexuality and possession. The hedonistic killer is often highly organized and can be pathologicaly psychopathic. The most obvious examples are Dennis Rader and Ted Bundy.

Hugh Marston Hefner ‘prophet of pop hedonism' 

(April 9, 1926 – September 27, 2017)

In 1953, Hefner scraped together $8,000 from family and friends, including $1,000 from his mother, and in December of that year, he published the first issue of Playboy, producing the magazine at the kitchen table of his apartment. 

That first issue featured a nude pinup shot of Marilyn Monroe, and the rest was history.

It was that first issue of Playboy with Marilyn Monroe that launched Hugh Hefner as a social and sexual revolutionary. 

And after all the bunnies, all the playmates, all the girlfriends, Hefner wanted to be near Monroe for eternity.

He bought the crypt next to Monroe’s at the Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery in California, which he planned to be his final resting place.

“I’ve spent so much of my life looking for love in all the wrong places." 

Hugh M Hefner to the New York Times in 1992.

The charlatan takes very different shapes according to circumstances; but at bottom he is a man who cares nothing about knowledge for its own sake, and only strives to gain the semblance of it that he may use it for his own personal ends, which are always selfish and material.
—  Arthur Schopenhauer, “Similes, Parables and Fables”, Parerga and Paralipomena