Starter for Betty || @bubblegumxveil

“Wait, you told him you loved him?” Heather almost spit out her drink as she sat with Betty in her room. It was rare whenever the cousins spent time together, especially since Heather had moved out of Riverdale for college. “Definitely sounds serious” She grinned softly, happy to see her younger cousin so happy, especially with someone else, rather than being so into Archie.

Broken-Chapter Thirteen

Pairing: Connor Murphy x OC

Summary: It’s senior year for Carmen Dylan and things are about to get very interesting. Between a broken leg and a letter that was never supposed to be seen suddenly getting exposed, Carmen has enough going on. Then she meets Connor Murphy, the boy that everyone stays away from and her world changes. But not for the better. Everything soon spirals out of control as the popular students start mysteriously disappearing one by one and a new drug gets students acting stranger than normal.

Warnings: swearing,

Word Count: 1,646

I trudge back to school and am only fifteen minutes late for my English class. I try to wipe the misery off of my face before I step into class, hoping I will not be pelted with any more letters. Instead, Kurt’s obnoxious voice greets me.

“Well look who decided to show up. This has gotta be a new record,” he says as I sit down next to Alana near the front of the class. I try to ignore him but it only results in, you guessed it, getting pelted with a letter. I duck my head in time for it to fly by, landing in the recycling bin. I hear Kurt and Ram complaining about it not hitting me before giving each other a high five about it landing in the recycling, spouting really stupid recycling jokes. 

“Can you just shut the fuck up?” I yell, twisting my chair to look at them.

“Wow. Gay girl over here has a temper today,” Ram says to Kurt jabbing his thumb at me. I seriously wish I could have the power to glare a hole into each of those asshole’s heads. A dark head catches my eye and I look over at none other than Connor. Seriously?! Can I have five fucking minutes from this guy. Then I remember the guy that I nearly ran into on the first day of school. He was tall. God that was Connor. Ugh. I turn around quickly before I have to make eye contact. 

“ENOUGH! Everyone back to work,” Mr. Williams says, going back to doing whatever he does on his desktop.

All I have to do is get through this period and then I can come home and forget all of this even happened. But the idea of trying to forget about Connor shoots a pang in my heart. Ok maybe it’ll be harder than I thought. I flip open my book, trying to read the first few chapters of Frankenstein. God I hate English class.

RING!

Thank god. I slam my binder closed, about to get up and bolt. But that didn’t work out so well the last time so instead I pretend to fiddle with getting everything in my arms until everyone has emptied out of the classroom. I force myself to look down when Connor brushes by. Why didn’t he just go home when he ditched me earlier? I try not to think of it as I walk back towards my locker.

More notes cover my locker and I begin ripping them off in frustration. “I hate this fucking school,” I say to myself, struggling to get the tap off. 

“Need help?” I startle, whipping around to see Zoe awkwardly standing behind me, shifting her backpack uncomfortably.

“Uh, sure I guess. Thanks.” I shuffle to the side, allowing Zoe more room beside me.

“I’m sorry about all of this.”

I shrug. “It’s not your fault.”

“I know. I just wish I knew which one of those dicks did this,” Zoe says, crumbling a punch of tape and paper in her hands. “Who would even write something like this? It’s kind of creepy. Like the whole ‘all my hope is pinned on Zoe’ deal doesn’t make any sense to me. What if there’s someone at this school that is only alive because of me? That’s what is worrying me. I can’t have that kind of responsibility.”

I bite my tongue from telling her about Evan. “Yeah, it’s uh, it’s pretty weird. But I can kind of see why they’re pinning all of this on me. Like I am basically Evan’s only friend so…” Damn it. Evan wouldn’t want me to say that. “I mean like Evan has Jared, Michael, and Jeremy but like, they’re pretty busy.”

“Right…” We lapse into silence. “What about? Nevermind.”

“Hmm? What were you about to say?”

“Oh, uh, nothing. I was just thinking about Connor.”

“What about Connor?” There’s more venom in my words than I intended. Zoe catches on.

“Did something happen between you two or something?”

“What? Pfff. No. What are you talking about? I don’t even hang out with-”

“You’re a terrible liar.”

“What do you mean?” I ask, with as much innocence as I can muster.

“It doesn’t take a genius to know that you guys sneak out of school together to go to the Autumn Smile Apple Orchard.”

“How-how did you know about that?”

“You’re forgetting that Connor and I snuck out of the house together when we were younger. Plus it is so easy to sneak up on you too.”

“Wait you followed us?!”

Zoe cracks a smile. “ Yup. Let’s just say, when you have a very unpredictable brother, you gotta learn to sneak around so you don’t set him off.”

“Set him off?”

“Oh, yeah. Connor has really bad anger issues. Can’t really blame him though, although it’s hard when he bursts into your room screaming at you for no reason.”

“He’s never screamed at me before. Although I have noticed that he goes through major mood swings.”

“Yup. Part of being bi-shit I’m not supposed to talk about it. Connor will kill me.”

“Wait what do you mean?” Zoe thrusts all the paper and tape into my hands and races down the hall. “Zoe!” What the fuck was she talking about?

I peel the remaining notes off my locker before throwing everything in the garbage. I shove everything into my tattered backpack, about to leave before remembering that I should hand in the pictures that I took today. Nope not gonna think about the rest of that…scenario. I grab my camera, quickly taking the memory card out and stashing it in my pocket, racing off to Ms. Mare’s room. 

I get there right as Ms. Mare is leaving. “Wait!”

She turns to look back at me. “Carmen? Everything ok? You weren’t in class today.”

I catch my breath. “Yeah, sorry. I had, a uh, a doctor’s appointment that I forgot about. But I got the pictures for my nature assignment.” I fish around for the memory card, dropping it into her palm. 

“Oh! Well you could have just given it to me tomorrow.”

‘I uh, well…I was so excited to show you that I, uh, couldn’t wait.”

“There’s my perfect student. You’ll be a wonderful reporter one day, Carmen.”

I force a smile. “Yeah, I really hope so.”

Ms. Mare pats my shoulder. “Well enjoy the rest of your evening. See you tomorrow.” And with that she takes her leave.

I make my way down the hallway, passing by the band room. I stop, backing up a few steps and peeking in. Empty. My gaze travels to the grand piano and without fully realizing what I am doing, I set down my backpack and take a seat. I haven’t played piano for so long. Not since….the accident. I stretch my fingers before placing my hands delicately on the keys, closing my eyes. An old piano piece comes to mind and I start to play, allowing the music to guide my fingers around the keys. I avoid using my right foot for the pedals for obvious reasons and instead try using my left. Which feels really unnatural. 

The music builds and I let the music encompass me. I am filled with an overwhelming sense of freedom as I get into the rhythm of playing again. The world fades and it’s just me and the piano. After what feels like forever, I am brought back to reality with a huge crash. I jerk around, darting my eyes to the hallway. But nobody’s there. Weird. I sigh, taking up my backpack and heading outside to where an angry and agitated Jared and Evan wait.

“Where the fuck were you? We’ve been waiting for ages!” Jared slumps against his car dramatically. 

I roll my eyes. “Ugh, shut up Jared. I just had to hand in my photos for photography class.”

“M-Ms. Mare left t-ten minutes ago.”

“Really Evan?!” I can’t believe he sold me out.

“Yeah, so what took so long?” Jared crosses his arm, cocking his head to the side. 

“Zoe was helping me rip Dear Evan Hansen letters off my locker,” I say in defense.

“S-she left with C-connor a few minutes ago too.”

“Evan!”

“W-what? It’s, uh…it’s the truth.”

I sigh, pinching the bridge of my nose. 

“So? Where were you?”

“Why does it matter? I’m here now, let’s go.” I try to step toward the passenger door but Jared steps in my way.

“Where the fuck were you?!”

“J-Jared l-let it go. Carmen, she uh, doesn’t h-have to t-tell us.”

“No! I’m not going to fucking let it go! She was gone practically the whole afternoon and then just decides to show up right before school ends. Why? Where. Were. You?”

“That’s what this is about? Where I was this afternoon? Fine. I was with Connor!”

“Of fucking course.”

“What does that supposed to mean?”

“It means you should remember who your friends are! You think it’s ok to just dump us for that freak?”

“Connor is not a freak,” my voice shakes with barely contained anger.

“Yeah he is! Why can’t you fucking see it?”

“J-Jared,” Evan warns. 

“I mean what is so special about him? He’s a psychopath! He’ll just ruin your life!”

“That’s enough Jared. You know what? I’d prefer to walk home.”

“Go right ahead!”

“Fine, I will.” I start walking away, tears burning my eyes as I try to conceal them. I clench my fists until it hurts. But I barely notice it. I barely notice anything as I start walking down the street, avoiding everyone’s laughs and sneers. I need to get out of here. I duck into an alleyway, slumping against the brick wall. The tears start falling as I stumble farther down the alley, hoping it’s a shortcut back home. 

“Aw. Why so sad, girl?”

SoftBank's big checks are stalling tech IPOs

By Heather Somerville

LAGUNA BEACH, Calif. (Reuters) - Big cash infusions for startups from an ever-expanding group of financiers, led by SoftBank Group Corp <9984.T> and Middle East sovereign wealth funds, have extinguished hopes that the technology IPO market would bounce back this year.
These deep-pocketed financiers, which have traditionally invested in the public markets but are seeking better returns from private tech companies, have enabled startups to raise more money, stay private longer and spurn the regulatory hassles of an IPO even as they become larger than many public companies.
At The Wall Street Journal D.Live conference this week in Southern California, a number of venture capitalists, entrepreneurs, IPO experts and dealmakers spoke with Reuters about the surprisingly low number of IPOs and pointed to investors such as SoftBank for changing the business of startup financing.
“It’s not surprising if these companies get 10 term sheets,” said Nicole Quinn, an investing partner with Lightspeed Venture Partners, referring to formal offers of investment.
The result is a protracted IPO slump that has contributed to a 50 percent drop in the number of U.S. public companies over the last two decades, according to the Nasdaq. IPOs have fallen especially precipitously since 2014 - the year public market investors, including mutual funds, ramped up investment in private tech companies.
There are some signs of a more active fall for IPOs. Tech companies Switch , MongoDB and Roku have gone public in the past few weeks, with debuts from ForeScout and Zscaler ahead.

CORRECTION AHEAD?
Yet many investors are bracing for a market tumble after a sustained rally, raising questions about IPO opportunities for 2018.
Just 12 venture capital-backed tech companies went public in the United States in the first three quarters this year, compared to 27 for the same time period in 2014, according to IPO investment adviser Renaissance Capital.
The drought continues even though both the Dow Jones Industrial Average <.DJI> and Nasdaq Composite <.IXIC> are up more than 26 percent in the last year and market volatility is low, normally ideal conditions for an IPO.
Wall Street stock indexes have posted a string of record highs in recent weeks, and the Dow closed above 23,000 for the first time on Wednesday. [.N]
But Barry Diller, a longtime dealmaker and chairman of InterActiveCorp and Expedia Inc , said the huge funding rounds had eliminated the traditional reason for an IPO.
“There is no reason to be public unless you need capital, and almost all these companies do not need capital,” Diller said.

SOFTBANK-UBER DEAL EYED
Increasingly, the big checks are coming from SoftBank, which in May closed a $93 billion investment fund.
So far this year, it has announced at least 14 investments in technology companies globally, including a $500 million deal with fintech company Social Finance and a $3 billion investment in shared workspace company WeWork, both private and already worth billions of dollars.
SoftBank is in the next week expected to finalize a highly anticipated deal with Uber Technologies Inc [UBER.UL] in which it, along with other investors, would purchase as much as $10 billion in Uber shares, most of them from employees and existing investors in a so-called secondary offering.
“This is the third liquidity option,” said Larry Albukerk, who runs secondary market firm EB Exchange and spoke to Reuters by phone. “It used to be IPO or acquisition.”
SoftBank’s deals are causing venture capitalists to “prepare for more M&A exits,” and fewer IPOs over the long term, said Jenny Lee, managing partner at GGV Capital.
Meanwhile, Nasdaq’s private market business, set up in 2014, facilitated more than $1 billion in secondary market transactions last year, according to Bruce Aust, vice chairman of Nasdaq.
Secondary transactions allow employees and investors to get some cash by selling to other private investors, removing a significant pressure to go public.
The flood of private capital, and the lofty valuations that have come with it, have, paradoxically, created another reason for avoiding an IPO, said Chris Clapp, a managing director with consulting group MorganFranklin.
“Many times with my clients I don’t think they would achieve the same valuation in the public markets,” Clapp said in a phone interview.
Meal delivery company Blue Apron Holdings Inc took a 27 percent haircut when it went public in June and software company Cloudera Inc lost 53 percent of its valuation in its April IPO.
Snap Inc , the owner of messaging app Snapchat, is down more than 10 percent from its IPO price in March.

(Reporting by Heather Somerville; editing by Jonathan Weber and G Crosse)

SoftBank's big checks are stalling tech IPOs

By Heather Somerville

LAGUNA BEACH, Calif. (Reuters) - Big cash infusions for startups from an ever-expanding group of financiers, led by SoftBank Group Corp <9984.T> and Middle East sovereign wealth funds, have extinguished hopes that the technology IPO market would bounce back this year.

These deep-pocketed financiers, which have traditionally invested in the public markets but are seeking better returns from private tech companies, have enabled startups to raise more money, stay private longer and spurn the regulatory hassles of an IPO even as they become larger than many public companies.

At The Wall Street Journal D.Live conference this week in Southern California, a number of venture capitalists, entrepreneurs, IPO experts and dealmakers spoke with Reuters about the surprisingly low number of IPOs and pointed to investors such as SoftBank for changing the business of startup financing.

“It’s not surprising if these companies get 10 term sheets,” said Nicole Quinn, an investing partner with Lightspeed Venture Partners, referring to formal offers of investment.

The result is a protracted IPO slump that has contributed to a 50 percent drop in the number of U.S. public companies over the last two decades, according to the Nasdaq. IPOs have fallen especially precipitously since 2014 - the year public market investors, including mutual funds, ramped up investment in private tech companies.

There are some signs of a more active fall for IPOs. Tech companies Switch <SWCH.N>, MongoDB <MDB.O> and Roku <ROKU.O> have gone public in the past few weeks, with debuts from ForeScout and Zscaler ahead.



CORRECTION AHEAD?

Yet many investors are bracing for a market tumble after a sustained rally, raising questions about IPO opportunities for 2018.

Just 12 venture capital-backed tech companies went public in the United States in the first three quarters this year, compared to 27 for the same time period in 2014, according to IPO investment adviser Renaissance Capital.

The drought continues even though both the Dow Jones Industrial Average <.DJI> and Nasdaq Composite <.IXIC> are up more than 26 percent in the last year and market volatility is low, normally ideal conditions for an IPO.

Wall Street stock indexes have posted a string of record highs in recent weeks, and the Dow closed above 23,000 for the first time on Wednesday. [.N]

But Barry Diller, a longtime dealmaker and chairman of InterActiveCorp and Expedia Inc <EXPE.O>, said the huge funding rounds had eliminated the traditional reason for an IPO.

“There is no reason to be public unless you need capital, and almost all these companies do not need capital,” Diller said.



SOFTBANK-UBER DEAL EYED

Increasingly, the big checks are coming from SoftBank, which in May closed a $93 billion investment fund.

So far this year, it has announced at least 14 investments in technology companies globally, including a $500 million deal with fintech company Social Finance and a $3 billion investment in shared workspace company WeWork, both private and already worth billions of dollars.

SoftBank is in the next week expected to finalize a highly anticipated deal with Uber Technologies Inc [UBER.UL] in which it, along with other investors, would purchase as much as $10 billion in Uber shares, most of them from employees and existing investors in a so-called secondary offering.

“This is the third liquidity option,” said Larry Albukerk, who runs secondary market firm EB Exchange and spoke to Reuters by phone. “It used to be IPO or acquisition.”

SoftBank’s deals are causing venture capitalists to “prepare for more M&A exits,” and fewer IPOs over the long term, said Jenny Lee, managing partner at GGV Capital.

Meanwhile, Nasdaq’s private market business, set up in 2014, facilitated more than $1 billion in secondary market transactions last year, according to Bruce Aust, vice chairman of Nasdaq.

Secondary transactions allow employees and investors to get some cash by selling to other private investors, removing a significant pressure to go public.

The flood of private capital, and the lofty valuations that have come with it, have, paradoxically, created another reason for avoiding an IPO, said Chris Clapp, a managing director with consulting group MorganFranklin.

“Many times with my clients I don’t think they would achieve the same valuation in the public markets,” Clapp said in a phone interview.

Meal delivery company Blue Apron Holdings Inc <APRN.N> took a 27 percent haircut when it went public in June and software company Cloudera Inc <CLDR.N> lost 53 percent of its valuation in its April IPO.

Snap Inc <SNAP.N>, the owner of messaging app Snapchat, is down more than 10 percent from its IPO price in March.



(Reporting by Heather Somerville; editing by Jonathan Weber and G Crosse)

anonymous asked:

🦁

interesting emoji choice friend

  1. Requiem from Dear Evan Hansen Original Broadway Cast Recording
  2. Navigating Home from Moana Original Movie Soundtrack
  3. Misguided Ghosts by Paramore
  4. Kindergarten Boyfriend from Heathers: The Musical Original Cast Recording
  5. Our Love Is God from Heathers: The Musical Original Cast Recording

send me an emoji and I’ll shuffle my iTunes library and make you a playlist