heart-health

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I haven’t posted much about this, but my cousin, Holly, is currently battling for her life. At the age of 23, three weeks after the birth of her second son, Holly suffered a heart attack. 

She has been diagnosed with Peripartum cardiomyopathy and has been in the hospital for congestive heart failure twice since then. Her father, who is a RN, left his job at the hospital to care for his daughter full time. 

Holly is currently out of the hospital, but is too weak to care for her children. Life doesn’t stop, as we all know, and things are getting tough for this family. I’m asking you guys to please help share and support this wonderful, caring family in this challenging time. 

Here is her GoFundMe page

DIY Heart Healthy Syrup

Yay! The first medicine I’ve prepared for my herbal first aid cupboard is a Heart Healthy Syrup! Here’s what I did, step by step. (Warning, Image heavy post!!)

The main medicinal ingredient in this syrup is chrysanthemum. Chrysanthemum is a great overall healthy herb, it helps reduce fevers and infections and has lots of antioxidants.  It has also been known to lower blood pressure levels and increase blood flow to the heart. I’ll probably make a fever reducing syrup later on, but there are more herbs I’d like to add to that so today I focused on the heart aspect.

(**NOTE: Please do not change medication of a diagnosed illness without consulting an actual medical professional!)

Alrighty, so first you’ll need some stuff…

  • Chrysanthemum (I used dried flowers, the kind for making tea.)
  • Honey
  • Sugar
  • Water
  • Small sauce pan
  • Small strainer
  • Something to stir with. A whisk will help later on too.
  • A funnel
  • Containers for storage (I used recycled brandy bottles.)

Step 1!

Add ¼ cup of chrysanthemum and a quart (4 cups) of cold water to your sauce pan. Its important for the water to be cold or room temp so everything infuses as it heats up together. 

Step 2!

Heat on medium temp. and bring to a simmer. Simmer liquid on med-low or low (depending on your stove) and reduce it to about ½ or a pint (2 cups.) This will take awhile so be patient. The important thing is to not heat to too high too quickly.

Step 3!

Strain your mixture into a separate container. Pour back into the pot. You don’t have to, but I added food coloring at this step to tell my syrups apart more easily.

Step 4!

Add two cups of sweetener. I used one cup of sugar and one cup of honey. You can use whatever sweetener you have, agave, sugar, honey, brown sugar, even maple syrup. Some recipes will say just use one cup of sweetener especially if you’re just going to refrigerate it, but I used more as a preservative and to make it shelf safe. Add the sugar first and whisk to dissolve, then add your honey.

Step 5!

Warm over low heat and stir well for about 30 minutes. Again this will be tedious, but slow and steady wins the race, you don’t want your sugars to burn. It will thicken and reduce to about half again.

Step 6! 

You’re almost done! Use a funnel to pour the warm syrup into empty, glass containers. Leave them on the counter to cool. After they’ve cooled, don’t forget to label and date them.

Treats high blood pressure/hypertension and heart irregularities

Directions: Take one spoonful by mouth daily, or add to warm tea.

Hope you enjoyed! I’ll add my tutorial for a stomachache syrup tonight! :)

thetruthaboutcancer.com
The Truth About Cholesterol, Statin Drugs, and Cancer
25 million Americans are on statin drugs to lower cholesterol and decrease their chance of heart disease. Discover how they may be causing cancer instead.

Cholesterol Drugs Increase Risk of Cancer and Death

Cholesterol drugs, as revealed in a 1993 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, have been causally associated with an increased risk of non-cardiovascular health conditions. These are essentially any disease not related to the heart or blood vessels, as well and death. A team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) determined that the intervention-based method of using fibrates and/or statins to lower cholesterol may be a misguided one that’s putting millions of people at risk.

What they found is that patients who lower their cholesterol levels by taking such drugs simultaneously increase their risk of developing other chronic health conditions such as cancer. This is significant because it reiterates the fact that lowering cholesterol with drugs isn’t the catch-call for increasing mortality that the medical system often claims it is. It also supports the notion that high cholesterol itself isn’t necessarily even a problem.

“Meta-analyses of primary prevention trials in middle-aged men reveal an increase in non-CHD (coronary heart disease) deaths among those randomized to cholesterol interventions, an unexpected finding that is more substantial than the decrease in CHD deaths,” the authors reported.

“This raises the possibility that one or more of the cholesterol interventions could have very serious adverse effects among young adults, whose risk of non-CHD death is normally 100 times their risk of CHD death.”

As February is heart health awareness month and with Valentine’s Day just around the corner, here are some heart stories from our archives – from what women need to know about heart attacks, to how energy drinks can adversely affect heart function, to a heartwarming story of a mom who developed heart failure after giving birth to her first child.  And since chocolate and Valentine’s Day are inextricably linked, how cocoa may improve skeleton function in people with advanced heart failure.