health city

I wonder if Kaiba ever put out a general duel etiquette and health disclaimer for his tournaments.

Like…

  • Drink plenty of water and wear comfortable clothing while participating.
  • Pay attention to hazardous conditions such as wet piers, docks, or bridges or high places.
  • Do not trespass.
  • Do not duel on the building ledges.
  • Do not duel in abandoned warehouses or private property where there are unsupervised machinery.
  • Do no force other duelists to duel if they do not consent.
  • Holographic images and impact effects may include, whiplash, shock, dizziness, drowsiness, numbness, sudden but temporary blindness, breathlessness, sudden depression, sudden euphoria, sudden rage, sudden anxiety, panic attacks, an in rare occasions sexual arousal or lost of consciousness .
  • Participate in duels with caution if you have the following health conditions: a history of blood clots, history of fainting, history of vertigo, history of sleep walking, insomnia, lapse in memory, asthma, sensitivity to light, sensitivity to sound, a heart condition, high blood pressure, low blood pressure, documented phobias, are pregnant, back injuries, hospitalized in the last 3 months, or a current health condition that needs strict monitoring or PTSD.

You know…just wondering…I assume he has a legal team.

6

Edie Sedgwick pushing Andy Wharol into the pool at a party at Al Roon’s Health Club in New York City, March 1965.

Also pictured are Kevin McCarthy, Isabella Eberstadt and Marisol Escobar.

Photos by Bob Adelman

We need more walls like this in big city’s, just to clean the air. 
So if any architects follow me, and you get an assignment to design a building, think about it and include it in your design. You will help yourself, your kids and thousands of people with it

Source:  viktoria.dahlberg

Let’s play Self-Care Bingo

When this shows up on your dash, you’re challenged to get four of these in a row (in any direction) in the coming week.

Here’s the scoring system:

Four in a row: you’re doing good
Three in a row: you’re doing good
Two in a row: you’re doing good
One in a row: you’re doing good
None in a row: you’re still doing good

Shout BINGO when you’re done ^.^

Mental-health issues can’t be solved by psychologists alone—city design can help, too

The world’s cities aren’t very mentally healthy.

People who reside in cities are more likely to develop depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia than those living in the countryside. No matter where you live, at least one in four people will have a mental illness in their lifetime, and everyone suffers from mental-health problems such as low mood, loneliness, stress, and anxiety at some time or another. These kinds of problems can affect everything from our relationships and housing to our social capital and resilience.

But mental health is not just an individual issue: It affects the whole city. According to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), economic costs associated with mental illness amount to 4% of national GDP. Mental illness increases a city’s costs of health and social care and puts people at higher risk of physical-health problems. There are also indirect costs to the city: People with mental-health problems can become disadvantaged in education and employment, and their opportunities for economic and social participation may begin to decline.

In these ways, mental-health problems affect a city’s ability to remain thriving, resilient, and sustainable. But while many of the more physical aspects of health have been addressed using urban design—for example, some cities have created walking and biking infrastructure that encourages physical fitness to reduce obesity, while others have separated pedestrians from motor-vehicle emissions to reduce urban air pollution and prevent respiratory diseases—most cities have not taken the same intentional approach with their citizens’ mental health.

The solution for mentally healthy cities

But urban planners can design the urban environment in ways that systematically address mental-health opportunities. For example:

  • Expanding access to green spaces—such as parks, street trees, or even office-window views of nature—has been proven to benefit mental health.
  • “Active design” is not simply a physical health effort: Because regular exercise can be an effective way to address some forms of mild depression (as well as reducing anxiety and some of the symptoms of dementia, ADHD, and even schizophrenia), interventions like creating walking circuits in a park or installing safe cycling infrastructure can have substantial mental-health benefits.
  • Positive social interaction increases self esteem and feelings of belonging as well as mitigating loneliness and anxiety. In order to encourage this, public spaces can install features like benches and chess tables to facilitate social interaction and provide settings for community activities.

When people are experiencing mental-health problems, individual and group interventions by mental health professionals are essential. But when it comes to promoting good mental health and preventing disorders, there are myriad untapped opportunities. When we shift the scale of innovation from the individual to the city, we can create long-lasting solutions that make our cities more enjoyable—and mentally healthy—for all.

one of many things that i find deeply fucked up in tony’s sales pitch of the jericho is how he kicks it off by like… literally responding to one of machiavelli’s points when he says “is it better to be feared or respected? i say, is it too much to ask for both?”

from chapter XVII of the prince:

“Upon this a question arises: whether it be better to be loved than feared or feared than loved? It may be answered that one should wish to be both, but, because it is difficult to unite them in one person, is much safer to be feared than loved, when, of the two, either must be dispensed with.”

and just the fact that the name of the missile is “jericho,” really, and tony presents it with a mountain chain behind him and then all the explosions – pretty sure that’s supposed to parallel the collapse of the walls of jericho (described in the bible, book of joshua). this wouldn’t be the only (or the first) biblical reference by tony in this movie

like there’s something really cold… and dark… about this. about tony weaving machiavelli and the bible into a sales pitch for a missile. and then the showmanship of the whole thing. having a drink afterward. throwing in a high tech cooler as a ~special treat in purchases of five hundred million dollars or more.

it’s all sooo…. fucked. up. IM1 had no chill about this stuff. and it’s ultimately such an important part of the change in tony. because the double-dealing might have been on stane, it might have been something tony would never do himself, but like tony said, “it’s my name on the side of the building.” he did sit down at one point and incorporated war into marketing strategy. regardless of what his true intent or goals were as a part of the weapons industry (stark innovations all relied on military funding, and the most genuine statement of intent that we get is the post-captivity mention that he created weapons to “defend and protect”) the fact that tony was this polished businessman wearing perfectly pressed suits and having a drink in the middle of a desert war zone after making a small marketing spectacle out of something he personally designed to kill from a distance and at the push of a button – that’s fucked up and it must weigh a SHIT TON in his conscience. it’s the “i saw that i had become part of a system that is comfortable with zero accountability” part of his post-captivity press conference speech. the fact that in his line of business one would design something deadly, sell it, and then just watch it being used to kill others from the comfort of one’s own home while thinking “i just designed the button and sold it, i didn’t push it” or worse: “well, ultimately pushing the button is necessary, and from an objective standpoint, pushing the button means i sell more stuff to keep paying for x, y and z”

and that, thank FUCK, is what tony got out of. tony started at “it’s an imperfect world but it’s the only one we’ve got, i guarantee you the day weapons are no longer needed to keep the peace, i’ll start making bricks and beams for baby hospitals” then *actually* made that exact leap by shutting weapons manufacturing down then pouring billions and billions and billions of the money he made into clean energy initiatives, mental health research, the avengers, city clean-up through the maria stark foundation, student research grants. it’s interesting because tony is one of two (thor being the second) current mcu heroes who actually had to like. drown in sudden awareness of his own privilege in order to get to where he is. so when people ask “uh why does tony suddenly care what 117 other countries think” well, it’s this

tony coming to care about what 117 other countries think is the whole point of his character development and look the fact that the iron man franchise itself, after IM1, just fucking DROPPED the arc of tony’s feeling of personal accountability over his role in the military-industrial complex – is in fact a fucking crime and i will never forgive them