hawaii people

Interesting. So my book about being Japanese American in Japan talks about the different experiences of those of us from Hawaiʻi vs. Continental US. Not only the way we identify outside of Japan but the way we identify and our different experiences in Japan. Apparently many Japanese people from Hawaii are widely accepted in Japan by Japanese people. While Japanese Americans are more excluded in Japan by Japanese people. Even when both (Continental US and Hawaii) are both 100% Japanese.

And I know recently I got into an argument with someone (not Japanese) who called me American and I said I was from Hawaii and they tried to tell me that I was American. This book helped solidify that here in Hawaii, many of us also differentiate from those in the Continental US when it comes to our views towards our identity. Not because we hate the US but the cultures and the likes are different.

anonymous asked:

If you could go to a vacation in Hawaii, any 5 people who you will you go with.

oh man, hawaii’s like at the top of the places i wanna visit before i die ???

anyways, i’m taking my girlfriends obvi; @kennaofstormholt, @zahranamazis and @lanapowellblog (i’m getting you drunk, babe or even slightly tipsy). then i’m also taking my loser friend @niasusanto (so we can cry over pretty people together) and @maxwellbeaumonts in hopes that she can meet the bartender dude irl ???

auli’i cravalho’s name

for those of you having difficulty pronouncing her name, the apostrophe in her first name is not actually an apostrophe! its a bit of hawaiian punctuation called an ʻokina. because hawaiian tends to be very vowel-heavy and can have multiple consecutive vowel sounds with no consonants dividing them, the ‘okina serves an indicator of a pause between vowel sounds (a glottal stop if we’re being technical).

so auli’i would be pronounced like OW-LEE-EE rather than OW-LEE. cravalho is likely an anglicization of the portuguese surname, carvalho, which makes sense because hawaii has a pretty large portuguese population. (for example, i have a friend who’s last name, loui, is a messed up attempt at anglicizing the chinese name, liu).

usually the ‘okina is removed from hawaiian words outside of hawaii to avoid confusing people who are unfamiliar with the language’s conventions. for example, hawaii would actually be hawai’i, ohana would be ‘ohana, and luau would be lu’au (there’s actually supposed to be a straight bar above the first ‘u’ called a kahako, which lengthens and emphasizes the vowel, but im too lazy to try to format that lol).

and that concludes this linguistic primer on hawaiian punctuation, have a great day y’all.

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I’ve been meaning to say thank you so much for the nickname. Oh yeah, glad you like it. It was super easy to come up with. Father Joseph, Father Broseph, Father Bro, Father Brah. Bam! I mean attendance has shot through the roof since you did that.

A COUPLE OF FACTS

Hawaiian pizza is not a thing that most people like in Hawaii (I personally think it’s fuckin disgusting)

Pineapples are South American (possibly Brazillian) not Hawaiian

Wearing a “Hawaiian” shirt to a party does not automatically make it a luau nor does it make you Hawaiian

There is a difference between “Hawaiian” shirts and Aloha shirts

Authentic Hawaiian lei are made out of actual flowers and not that fucking neon plastic shit you haoles keep wearing

Hawaiian is an actual race ethnicity, therefore not all people from Hawaii are Hawaiian.

Hula is a fucking hard thing to master. Just because it looks pretty doesn’t mean it’s easy.

Hawaii is an illegally overthrown country that had it’s sovereignty violently ripped away from it in 1893 when our queen was held captive in her own home.

There is so much more to Hawaiian culture than this stupid neon beach party pineapple grass skirt tiki bullshit that you all keep spreading around. 

Please stop.

No, listen….I have so many feels whenever I watch the pilot episode okay? I had them when I first saw it and that increased every time the new season would end because there would be bunch of additional information that upon rewatch adds so much context to the characters. That conversation on lanai of McGarrett house is one of the best moments of the pilot. It’s a short one but boy does it drag my feelings around.

Here’s the thing. Steve loved his father. And his father loved him. But at that point in time, he did not know the full story. He did not know that his mother’s car accident was no accident or that she faked her death. He did not know that his father proverbially drowned in the guilt over his wife’s death because of his work.

What he did know is that his father sent him and his sister away (and separated them along the way as well) while the grief was so very fresh and raw and that ‘McGarrett men do not show their feelings, that’s a weakness’. The family that suffered a devastating loss was fractured because his father ‘is the kind of a man who cannot walk away from a fight’ and put his need to do his job before his children.

And here he is, eighteen years later sitting on the lanai drinking a beer with his new partner (an odd but logical choice) who apparently hates the place Steve was born and raised in. Partner who is very loud and clear on that front. But he is here and determined to keep the ‘pineapple infested hellhole’ safe because this was his daughter’s home now.

Daniel ‘Danny’ Williams is very homesick and above all, everything John McGarrett taught his son not to be. He is very emotional, outspoken and hoo boy, very vocal. He is also a very good cop and has great empathy for the victims/victims’ families. But the thing that drags my feels when that particular scene comes along is probably in how Steve looks at Danny while he speaks. 

The realization that comes to Steve how strikingly different fathers John and Danny were/are. Whereas John sent his children away for their safety but he himself stayed behind, Danny left everything he knew/had behind because the thought of Grace not being in his life and vice versa was too scary to even contemplate. That she might get hurt because he wasn’t there to make sure the place she was living in was safe. 

So you know the previous scene I posted before, Danny’s first carlogue, might be amusing and Steve mentally making check marks on his ‘ideal life partner’ list but this scene ten minutes later in the episode has me whipping out my shipper glasses because fuck me but Steve is halfway in love with Danny.

  • what she says: i'm fine
  • what she means: hawaii was stolen from my ancestors when our queen was held captive in her own home by white americans. we were banned from our own culture, because it was seen as "blasphemy." our country is now a tourist attraction, our luaus something for white people to gawk at. our culture has been bastardized. white people can buy cheap leis and decorations at the dollar store and call it a luau. white people can move to hawaii and call themselves hawaiian, and will fight you to the death if you say they aren't (they're white they'll always be white they'll always be the ones who stole our country). im hurt and upset and its been so long but i just want my country back.
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This beautiful color film footage will take you back to August 14, 1945 Honolulu, when the first word hit the streets that WWII was over. Military and citizens celebrate joyfully in the streets and old Waikiki.

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Dear Jennifer Lawrence: deliberately violating a culture’s sacred objects, mocking their reaction, and joking about it on national television is not okay

Since the British talk show clip has been discovered, people on the internet aren’t letting her just get away with it, however. Their analysis of the problem is pretty important.

Gifs: The Graham Norton Show/Petty Black Girl

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