flickr

Loch Lochy by Fraser Ross
Via Flickr:
An overcast and misty day at Loch Lochy near Fort William

youtube

This beautiful Swedish lady sings an ancient Viking song. Now watch how the cows respond. 

It is often argued that everything our ancestors did and said gets stored into our brains. Their experience and knowledge gets passed down from generation to generation. This may explain why we know or react to certain things without having any prior knowledge.

Kulning is an ancient herding call used in the Scandinavian region. The call is a high pitch tone that can reach long distances. The herding call sounds more like a haunting and sad melody meant to echo through mountains and alleys.

It was getting late and foggy on a magical night last month when Swedish artist Jonna Jinton wanted to try kulning. She wanted to find out if the animals would answer to the call their own ancestors heard when the women called them. Kulning might just be one of the most beautiful and enchanting sounds ever made.

youtube

Vicious is one of the most incredible short horror films I’ve ever seen! I definitely got chills. Please support the people behind this short! They’re doing some incredible stuff!

@sixpenceee have you seen this? Looks like you’re type of thing

Pricolici aesthetic

Romanian folklore creatures series - III

Pricolici, similar to strigoi (troubled spirits of the dead rising from the grave), are undead souls that have risen from the grave to harm living people. While a strigoi possesses anthropomorphic qualities similar to the ones it had before death, a pricolici always resembles a wolf or a dog. Malicious, violent men are often said to become pricolici after death, in order to continue harming other humans. Sometimes “sin children” (from incest) become pricolici after they die.

2

Did Teresita Basa solve her own murder? Born in the Philippines in 1929, Teresita moved to Chicago, Illinois, where she became a respiratory therapist at Edgewater Hospital. She was known to be a very reserved woman. On a crisp cold evening in 1977, the shrill sound of a fire engine could be heard speeding towards an apartment in N. Pine Grove Avenue.

As they extinguished a fire in 15B, they were more than horrified to find a body hidden under a mattress. They were even more aghast to discover that the body was nude with a butcher knife in the middle of her chest. The body was that of Teresita Basa. After a couple of months, the case went cold. That was until lead detective, Joe Stachula, found a note on his desk telling him to call the Evanston Police Department. When he called, he was told a bizarre story about a Dr. Jose Chua. Jose had told police that his wife, Remy Chua, was possessed by Teresita Basa.

He explained that his wife would go into a comatose state and would claim to be Basa. While this story sounds absolutely ridiculous, Mr. Chua soon became intrigued when his wife blurted out what she claimed was the name of Basa’s killer - Allan Showery. She told her husband that Showery had also stolen jewellery from Basa’s apartment. Police decided they would investigate these claims, even though they assumed it was just fabrication. Lo and behold, it just so turned out that a man called Allan Showery worked with Basa.

Police called Showery in to question him and after catching him in a number of lies, he confessed that it was true - he had murdered Teresita Basa. When police went to search his home, they discovered a number of pieces of jewellery that had been stolen from Basa’s apartment. After pleading guilty, Showery was sentenced to fourteen years for murder and four years for arson and robbery. However, he was released in 1983 after serving less than five years.