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All babies are small compared to their parents, but there is something particularly awesome about the size difference between this proud mama Galápagos Tortoise and her tiny new hatchlings, who emerged from their shells back in January 2014 at Australia’s Taronga Western Plains Zoo. This zoo became the first in Australia to successfully breed Galápagos Tortoises when RJ, the slightly larger baby you see standing between the wee hatchlings and parent, hatched three years ago.

One of the longest-living vertebrates, Galápagos Tortoises can live for over 100 years in the wild and reach weights of around 880 pounds (400 kg) and lenghths of up to 5 feet (1.5 m). They are found only on the Galápagos archipelago, west of continental Ecuador.

Head over to ZooBorns for additional photos and to learn more about Galápagos Tortoises.

“Little Cooks” - These little dragons love to cook! They have a unique sense of flavor in their palettes and would love to fix a meal for you!

Prints available: http://www.sixthleafclover.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1_56&products_id=472

High-Res image: http://www.sixthleafclover.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=36_40&products_id=475

Little Gatherers available: http://www.sixthleafclover.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1_56&products_id=453

Dragons don’t consider breeding together to be something inherently romantic - having children is just considered a general duty for the clan and all of the adult members of the clan raises the children together. A dragon is often in a romantic relationship with one or more dragons, while also breeding with many other dragons they consider their friends and nothing more.