hashima island japan

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Hashima Island is an abandoned island which lies approximately 9 miles from Nagasaki, Japan. It was once a bustling mining community, with undersea coal mines. From 1930 to the end of the Second World War, prisoners of war were sent to the island and forced to mine coal under harsh conditions. It’s estimated that approximately 1,300 prisoners perished on the island. When the coal reserves dissipated in 1974, the mine was closed and the island left abandoned.

The Battleship Island (2017)

Upcoming Korean historical drama / movie (2016~2017)  # 12

█ The Battleship Island (2017 Movie)

  • Official English Title : The Battleship Island
  • Korean Title : 군함도 軍艦島
  • Period : Japanese colonial period (1910~1945)
  • Director : Ryoo Seung-wan 류승완 (Veteran 베테랑, The Unjust 부당거래, The Berlin File 베를린)
  • Cast : Hwang Jung-Min 황정민, Song Joong-ki 송중기, So Ji-seop 소지섭
  • Genre : Prison break, Action, Thriller, Human drama
  • Release Date : TBA (July, 2017)

Based on a true story of 400 Koreans who were drafted into the forced labor in Hashima island, Japan, during the Japanese occupation (1910~1945).

Teaser trailer

Hashima Island, Japan

A few months ago, our friend and collaborator Andrew Meredith took a trip to the Hashima Island, on the Southwest coast of Japan.
The island, a coal mining settlement established in the 1800s, was once the most densely inhabited place on earth. However, it had been completely deserted since the early 1970s, when the Government of Nagasaki decided to close the mine.

Even though people left, the buildings where they used to work and live, along with their belongings remained untouched and suspended in time as a testimony of a city that once was and shut down in a bat of an eye.

Through photography, Andrew Meredith was able to raise awareness on the existence of this hidden place, where none of us will probably ever go. Meredith’s intense and resonant photographs of the inanimate apartments, school, hospital and mine manage to express what it used to be on the Island and, in a way, give it a second life.

The full photo-report is viewable here.

External image

External image

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  1. Dadipark- Dadizel, Belgium
  2. Holland Island- Chesapeake Bay
  3. City of Pripyat, Ukraine
  4. Christ of the Abyss- San Fruttuoso, Italy
  5. Hashima Island, Japan
  6. Château Miranda or Château de Noisy- Celles, Belgium
  7. Kasteel van Mesen- Lede, Belgium
  8. Nara Dreamland- Japan
  9. Ryugyong Hotel- Pyongyang, North Korea
  10. City Hall Subway Station- New York City

Japan’s abandoned Hashima Island

Source: Chris Luckhardt (flickr)

motionblur:

This is a view of Japan’s abandoned Hashima Island from the publicly inaccessible residential area.

The island has been abandoned since the Spring of 1974. Since that time, the island has been beaten by typhoons, a tsunami and general decay.

Hashima Island (also know by its nickname “Gunkanjima”) was featured in Skyfall, the most recent James Bond film. Shots of the island from the ocean were digitally enhanced to make the island appear larger. No filming was done on the island - everything was recreated on a sound stage.

From Wikipedia:

The island was populated from 1887 to 1974 as a coal mining facility. The island’s most notable features are the abandoned and undisturbed concrete apartment buildings and the surrounding sea wall. The island has been administered as part of Nagasaki city since the merger of the former town of Takashima in 2005.

It is known for its coal mines and their operation during the industrialization of Japan. Mitsubishi bought the island in 1890 and began the project, the aim of which was extracting coal from undersea mines. They built Japan’s first large concrete building (9 stories high), a block of apartments in 1916 to accommodate their burgeoning ranks of workers. Concrete was specifically used to protect against typhoon destruction. In 1959, the 6.3-hectare (16-acre) island’s population reached its peak of 5,259, with a population density of 835 people per hectare (83,500 people/km2, 216,264 people per square mile) for the whole island, or 1,391 per hectare (139,100 people/km2) for the residential district.

As petroleum replaced coal in Japan in the 1960s, coal mines began shutting down all over the country, and Hashima’s mines were no exception. Mitsubishi officially announced the closing of the mine in 1974, and today it is empty and bare, which is why it is called Ghost Island.

I explored the island with the help of a Japanese photographer and “haikyo” expert who acted as my guide (she had previously taken a British guy to the island). Access to the off-limits sections of the island is strictly forbidden by law, though a small portion of the island was re-opened for tourism on April 22, 2009.

Japan’s abandoned Hashima Island

Source: Chris Luckhardt (flickr)

motionblur:

This is a view of Japan’s abandoned Hashima Island from the publicly inaccessible residential area.

The island has been abandoned since the Spring of 1974. Since that time, the island has been beaten by typhoons, a tsunami and general decay.

Hashima Island (also know by its nickname “Gunkanjima”) was featured in Skyfall, the most recent James Bond film. Shots of the island from the ocean were digitally enhanced to make the island appear larger. No filming was done on the island - everything was recreated on a sound stage.

From Wikipedia:

The island was populated from 1887 to 1974 as a coal mining facility. The island’s most notable features are the abandoned and undisturbed concrete apartment buildings and the surrounding sea wall. The island has been administered as part of Nagasaki city since the merger of the former town of Takashima in 2005.

It is known for its coal mines and their operation during the industrialization of Japan. Mitsubishi bought the island in 1890 and began the project, the aim of which was extracting coal from undersea mines. They built Japan’s first large concrete building (9 stories high), a block of apartments in 1916 to accommodate their burgeoning ranks of workers. Concrete was specifically used to protect against typhoon destruction. In 1959, the 6.3-hectare (16-acre) island’s population reached its peak of 5,259, with a population density of 835 people per hectare (83,500 people/km2, 216,264 people per square mile) for the whole island, or 1,391 per hectare (139,100 people/km2) for the residential district.

As petroleum replaced coal in Japan in the 1960s, coal mines began shutting down all over the country, and Hashima’s mines were no exception. Mitsubishi officially announced the closing of the mine in 1974, and today it is empty and bare, which is why it is called Ghost Island.

I explored the island with the help of a Japanese photographer and “haikyo” expert who acted as my guide (she had previously taken a British guy to the island). Access to the off-limits sections of the island is strictly forbidden by law, though a small portion of the island was re-opened for tourism on April 22, 2009.

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31.03.2014 Nagasaki/Gunkanjima

Seriously, this city is so beautiful and I was really lucky: the day started kinda cloudy, but ended super sunny.

So in the morning I washed my stuff at the guesthouse and went out for a walk. I still had time until bording, so I walked around some nice park and up to the famous church. Somehow that one felt different from the ones I visited in Germany. Besides they mixed stories with japanese people which was pretty interesting.

Since there wasn’t much time left I just skipped the Glover garden and went to the meeting point for Gunkanjima. I really wanted to visit that island and didn’t regret spending the money for that tour. Just before I went on the boat a nice girl from Nagasaki started to talk to me. She will start to work for that company from the next day and just joined a tour before. We had a great time together discovering the famous island Gunkanjima.

Somehow I started to imagine: that’s how our earth will look like in some 100’s years. No people left, just rotten stuff. The island deserve its name. On that island I just found another guy from Germany. We are truly everywhere :D

After that refreshing tour the sun was shining and I went for another walk. This time to Chinatown and some shopping area. I randomly walked around and found some nice places. 

Since it is famous for its night view I decided to go on top of Mt Inasa. When I got there, I was next to a japanese guy from Fukuoka, who started talking to me. It’s nice how many people actually talk to me randomly. I’m relived that my Japanese is better than I expected so I can actually talk to them.

That’s how I ended that day: with talking Japanese and drinkin Yebisu for the first time.

Today’s calendar:
Weather: started cloudy but pretty sunny later
Distance: Nagasaki
Accommodation: Nagasaki Guesthouse Casa Noda

Positive: Enjoying incredible places with amazing new people
Negative: nothing

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20 Cool Abandoned Places in the World

1. Mirny Diamond Mine- Eastern Siberia, Russia

2. Villa Epecuén- Buenos Aires Province, Argentina

3. Hotel Salto del Tequendama- Columbia

4. Abandoned flats- Keelung, Taiwan

5. House of the Bulgarian Communist Party- Mount Buzludzha, Bulgaria

6. Abandoned mill - Sorrento, Italy

7. Abandoned comune and medieval village of Craco, Italy

8. Abandoned train depot- Czestochowa, Poland

9. Spree Park- Berlin, Germany

10. Gulliver’s Travels Park- Kawaguchi, Japan

11. Dadipark- Dadizel, Belgium

12. Holland Island- Chesapeake Bay

13. City of Pripyat, Ukraine

14. Christ of the Abyss- San Fruttuoso, Italy

15. Hashima Island, Japan

16. Château Miranda or Château de Noisy- Celles, Belgium

17. Kasteel van Mesen- Lede, Belgium

18. Nara Dreamland- Japan

19. Ryugyong Hotel- Pyongyang, North Korea

20. City Hall Subway Station- New York City

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Hashima Island, Japan

In the past Hashima Island was rich in coal, with over 5000 miners once living on the island. When petrol replaced coal as Japan’s main source of fuel, the settlement was left abandoned. Now the once thriving town is creepily abandoned, with only shadows remaining.