harry potter and disney

someone: haha why are you so obsessed with *insert show/book series/film/etc)

me, internally: because throwing myself into something allows me to briefly forget the constant depression misery and sadness i suffer through every day and when i marathon things my self hatred sometimes starts to disappear because i forget that i’m a real person who exists in the real world. my obsessions help me to cope when i feel like i’m about to explode or cry or scream or all of those at once and once i get into something i barely think of anything else for weeks which is a very unhealthy coping tactic but hey it helps so

me: haha idk :))

Marauders at Disney
  • James and Sirius, upon entering the park, make a beeline to secure fast passes for their favorite rides (the ones like Matterhorn, Indiana Jones, Space Mountain, etc.)
  • At this point, Remus is really regretting not investing in a pair of those child-leashes that a good third of the parents at the theme park are sporting.
  • Peter tries running after Sirius and James, but gives up (not being fast enough) and hangs back alongside Remus, getting distracted by the array of gift/candy shops lining Main Street USA
  • Remus has to get a picture of Sleeping Beauty’s castle upon entering. He just has to. 
  • James and Sirius are really smug when they get to cut in front of everyone with their fast passes. Remus just gives apologetic looks, and Peter has to shovel down the pretzel he bought before they get on the ride. 
  • Ok, so considering the average temperature for Scotland during the summer time is around fifty seven degrees, and for southern California (L.A.) it’s around eighty one- they’re dying.
  • James and Sirius are wearing the bare minimum, and Remus has to rent a locker to stuff his sweater into
  • Sirius is rocking a man bun
  • James buys a Wizard Mickey hat and absolutely refuses to take it off
  • Peter may or may not be on his fifth churro by the time lunch rolls around
  • Remus really enjoys the small corners and alleys of the park where the crowd thins 
  • Peter gets a coonskin hat from frontierland
  • Lots of shameless flirting with princesses coming from Sirius that result in autographs with the occasional phone number attached. 
  • James seeing the Ariel and automatically missing Lily
  • Peter getting sick on the teacups ride after James decides to spin theirs as fast as he fucking can.
  • Lots of “JAMES NO!” 
  • Sirius and James, after hearing about the two hundred feral cats that prowl the park at night, decide to go on a hunt for them
  • They legit smuggle cat nip inside the park and search the bushes for cats
  • Remus is so done with everyone’s shit
  • He just wants to have a normal visit at Disneyland is that so hard to ask?
  • Peter really wants to watch the parades, but Remus sees this as an opportune time to beat the crowds (now gathered along the street) to the rides
  • Remus is honestly ride or die. He doesn’t fuck with these slow ass tourists who have no idea where they’re going. He knows where to go and everyone is getting in his way.
  • Sirius getting picked on by characters (i.e. Chip ‘n Dale tugging on his man bun and snickering at it) 
  • James in a flexing contest with Gaston
  • Remus only taking pictures the Mickey and Friends characters
  • And he’s all embarrassed to walk up to them at first 
  • James taking the mic from the tour guide on Jungle Cruise because he thinks his jokes are lame, so he starts dishing out puns like its nothing and does a mic drop
  • Peter screaming a little too shrilly when the Yeti pops out on the Matterhorn
  • Sirius and James trying to find the entrance to the secret basketball court on the matterhorn
  • Also using alohomora to get into restricted areas of the park
  • Sirius singing Small World on repeat
  • James trying to harmonize
  • Remus really likes walking through Sleeping Beauty’s Castle (James and Sirius are hardly impressed)
  • But his favorite ride is the Disneyland Rail Road
  • Peter’s favorite ride is Star Tours and he convinces the others to ride it at least four times throughout the day.
  • James’ favorite ride is Indiana Jones. When he sees the snake statues in the ride, he mutters “Snivellus?”
  • Sirius prefers Pirates of the Caribbean 
  • Remus getting really insecure because he notices little kids looking at the scars on his face with mild confusion- some are even scared
  • But then Peter Pan comes over and he does his thing. He tells Remus (making a big show of it so that others can hear) that he must’ve put up a good fight against the “pirate” that did that, and comments on how brave he is
  • Remus is just smiling the entire time and plays along with Peter Pan, and the kids gathered around are awestruck
  • Sirius and James posing for the camera on Splash Mountain 
  • Having to restrain Sirius and James from jumping into the Rivers of America to get to the island
LIKE IF YOU’VE UNEXPECTEDLY JOINED A FANDOM AND HAD NO IDEA IT WOULD CONSUME YOUR SOUL
The 2 Elements of an ORIGINAL STORY IDEA

If you’ve been doing this writing thing for more than one day, you’ve likely experienced the following worry: 

“What if my story idea ISN’T ORIGINAL?”

And if my experience is any indication, things spiraled downwards from there: “What if it’s cliche? What if there’s nothing new here?! It IS cliche. It ISN’T original. I’m a failure! ALL MY WRITING NEEDS TO BURN!”

Calm yourself. There’s a way to make sure that your story concept is unique.  

First, what IS a story concept? It’s the initial idea that made you want to write the thing. It’s the “What If” question that starts everything off. Later, it will be the promise that hooks the reader or audience, and makes them want to experience the story. 

So for example: What if Cinderella was a cyborg? What if a rat wanted to be a french chef? What if a fish had to venture across the ocean to find his son who’s captive in a dentist’s office aquarium?   

All great concepts. All of which seem to be comprised of two elements: something that we already know about, a set up that establishes expectations, and then something contrasting and surprising, which creates irony or surprise.  
So the first element of a successful story concept is FAMILIARITY. 

Establishing expectations? Something we already know about? Familiarity?! That sounds like the definition of UNorginal. 

Hear me out. 

What do readers do when foraging for a new novel at the bookstore? Certain readers gravitate to certain shelves. Some go to mysteries, some to crime, a whole lot to romance, and the rest to the other genres that are too numerous to list.

 Why is this? Because genres give them a pretty good idea about what they’re going to get. Readers already know the conventions of the genre. They’ve already put in the work of learning, accepting, and enjoying these conventions. 

Genres give both reader and writer something to go on right away. For the reader, genres are expectations for story events, setting, character, and more, which are automatically enjoyable to them. For a writer, it’s a set of expectations which can be flipped to create something remarkable and unique.  

It’s like telling a joke. Without a setup, there can’t be a punchline. 

The genres are the setup, the individual twist the author puts on that genre is the punchline. Or in other words, readers truly do want the same thing –only different.  

To illustrate this, let’s take a look at one of the most successful stories of all time.

With space ships, interplanetary travel, sentient robots, and aliens running amok, Star Wars LOOKS to be the kind of story that requires the audience to expend lots of mental energy to comprehend and believe. At first glance, it seems that imaginations are going to have to stretch a great deal, and there won’t be anything familiar to ground us – this SEEMS like an uncomfortably new, unwelcoming world. But I doubt if anyone has ever felt uncomfortable or unwelcome while watching Star Wars. And the reason for this can be summed up with one ellipsis-ended sentence:

Suddenly, all is clear. This isn’t the hard-to-imagine future, this is the PAST. We’re not being asked to imagine and believe a totally new world; we’re being taken to the realm of “far, far away”, a place we’ve known since childhood. Isn’t “a long time ago” just another way of saying “once upon a time”? Yes, it is, so we know where we are now. We are in a fairy tale, a myth.  

The familiarity of fairy tales sets us at ease and sets our expectations in place. Expectations which Star Wars meets with flying colors: A farmboy who must become a knight. A princess imploring for aide. A mystical wise-old-man mentor. Sword fights between good and evil. A magic that operates like religion. A dark lord and a dark side. Star Wars was built upon something we already know, something timeless, something we’ve always enjoyed. 

And once those well-known expectations were set, Star Wars was free to add the unexpected and create one of those most memorable story worlds ever.
Think of a story you love, and you’ll probably be able to identify the something-already-known aspect of it.  

How about Harry Potter? 

When we hear “boarding school”, mental images and probabilities are instantly conjured in our minds. We picture classrooms, dormitories, a campus with very old buildings, kids in uniforms, a giant place for meals, living through a schoolyear with a bunch of kids your age, etc. Even if we don’t know much about boarding school, we all know what regular school is like (even us homeschoolers over here *waves*) and our expectations for that are nearly identical from person to person.  

So what does this prove?

It proves that one half of your story’s concept must be grounded in something we already know, and know well. These are the expectations you are going to establish for your reader, before the second element of your concept upends everything and creates something wholly unique. 

You need FAMILIARITY. You need to ground your concept in something WELL-KNOWN. Only then will you be able to create something ORIGINAL. 

Where can familiarity be found?  

1. Genre Conventions 

2. Occupations 

3. Well-known stories  

The possibilities are not limited to these categories, of course. Familiar subjects can be found within many other areas. However, Familiar elements seem to share certain qualities … 

Provides a rough timeline

⦁ Conjures imagery

⦁ Sets expectations for events, characters, opposition, etc

⦁ Has natural potential for conflict 

⦁ Serves as a goal-oriented backdrop for the plot

To see how this works, let’s look at Harry Potter again: 

Familiarity: Going to boarding school. (An occupation)

Timeline: A school year (which Voldy always lets Harry complete before trying to kill him again, bless him.)

Story Expectations: When we hear “school”, we know what we’re going to get.

Imagery: Boarding school conjures tons of possibilities. 

Conflict Potential: It’s a thousand kids living in one castle with a handful of adults – there’s going to be conflict. 

Goal-Oriented: School is inherently goal directed. You want to graduate. And in the case of boarding school, you want to win the house cup. 

But of course, this familiar environment is only HALF of the concept for Harry Potter. The other half, of course, is WITCHCRAFT AND WIZARDRY. Which brings us to the 2nd element of a successful story concept, which will be the subject of the next post.

ok but imagine muggleborns bringing disney to hogwarts

- muggle-borns singing high school musical songs only for other mb’s to join in
- everyone else is extremely confused
- screaming TO DEFEAT THE HUNS when teachers start lessons with “let’s get down to business”
- teaching all your pureblood pals the lyrics to all the songs
- prefects leading their houses in bursts of song
- RIFF OFFS BETWEEN HOUSES
- the teachers constantly scold for all the singing but secretly hum the songs all day
- someone introducing mcgonagall to cinderella
- mcgonagall using cinderella in a transfiguration lesson bc fairy god mother changes all cinderellas shit
- the kids calling mcgonagall fairy god mother
- muggleborns showing pureblood kiddos all their fav disney movies
- pureblood kiddos LEARNING ABOUT DISNEY PARKS and losing their minds bc there’s an actual PLACE where this stuff comes to life
- showing all ur pureblood pals ur fav disney movies
- them criticizing everything bc ‘THATS JUST NOT HOW MAGIC WORKS!’
- but they secretly love it
- jamming to we’re all in this together in the common rooms during exams
- lee jordan yelling WHAT TEAM whilst narrating quidditch matches
- everyone in the stands yelling WILD CATS