harrington jackets

i’m ready to break, you’re ready to bend

for @eggo-my-leggo, thanks for motivating me ely :)

read on ao3

tw: implied/referenced child abuse

Steve walked down the road quickly.  His eyes were burning, but he wasn’t sure how much of that was from the cold.  It was freezing, and he tucked his hands under his armpits before the fell off.  Winter in Indiana was always shitty, but in the evening it was even worse.

“Why the hell couldn’t you have grabbed your jacket, Harrington?” he muttered angrily at himself under his breath.

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

ohh do you have some of the quotes and references to sexuality that johnny makes in his book please?

Sure!!

  • ‘They were lively nights, and I sat on the floor, watching and listening to handsome men and pretty women rocking as the night got more raucous and the bottle caps flew off.’ (p. 14)
  • ‘If it’s not exactly 100 per cent true that ‘clothes maketh the man,’ then it’s definitely a fact that clothes can maketh the man look a bit more interesting to girls and to other boys too.’ (p. 26)
  • ‘Marc Bolan became my idol. I collected every poster and photo of him I could find, usually from girls’ magazines like Jackie, and I went to the cinema to see his film Born to Boogie. Like George Best and Bruce Lee, Marc Bolan was small, audacious and good-looking, but best of all he was a pop star who played the guitar.’ (p. 28 - 29)
  • ‘Buying ‘Jeepster’ as my first record was a total fluke. It could have worked out differently had it not been for the picture of Bolan and Mickey Finn on the label.’ (p. 29)
  • ‘My friend Tony was a beautiful creature, another Bowie fan, with a blonde Ziggy haircut, high cheekbones, and green eyes like a Siamese cat. He wore red Oxford bags with white platforms and a black harrington jacket. Tony was three years older than me and was the first guy I knew who was openly gay.’ (p. 43 - 44)
  • ‘We were together a lot, and it got some people talking, which didn’t bother me at all - we had a lot of things in common and plenty to talk about. The two of us were in Piccadilly Gardens one Saturday afternoon just after I’d had my hair cut. We were waiting at the bus stop when two big uglies with north Manchester accents came over and started making cooing noises and blowing kisses. I looked at Tony’s face as he continued talking to me, and I could see he was aware of the situation. ‘Eh,’ said one of the lads, ‘are you queers?’ They were obviously up for a fight. I readied myself for the inevitable as Tony continued to talk to me with his back to the goons and appeared to be ignoring their remarks until one pushed him in the back and said, ‘Eh, y’fuckin’ queer.’ With that, Tony grabbed my head and kissed me on the lips for what seemed like a very long time, then spun around and attacked the biggest of the two with really hard punches to the face until the lad went on to his knees. He then grabbed the other guy, who was backing off, punched him very hard in the face and threw him down into the road full of traffic. I thought the guy was going to be killed, and as we ran off towards the train station Tony turned to me and said, ‘That was nice’ and then, laughing, he added, ‘Don’t worry, I won’t do it again.’
    On the train home in my platforms and Budgie jacket, I looked at Tony and thought about ‘All The Young Dudes’: ‘Now Lucy looks sweet ‘cause he dresses like a queen. But he can kick like a mule, it’s a real mean team.’ I loved the song, and there was no doubting it, pop music was for me and my friends.’ (p. 44 - 45)
  • ‘John’s hair was always tinted some shade of blue, red or green, and unusually for the times he was very ‘out’ as a young gay man, in a way that was brave and inspiring.’ (p. 123)
  • ‘[The Smiths, for their first gig] also planned to do a song by the girl group The Cookies, called ‘I Want a Boy for My Birthday’, which I realised would send out a message that not only didn’t bother me but which I was fairly amused by and quite excited about.’ (p. 132 - 133)
    (You can listen to a demo of I Want a Boy for My Birthday that Morrissey and Johnny recorded in Johnny’s bedroom in 1982 here!)
  • ‘Morrissey had suggested that for the gig we invite his friend James Maker to introduce us. I didn’t know James, but I thought that being introduced for our first show sounded good, and when I discovered that he would be wearing high-heeled stiletto shoes while he did it, I liked the idea even more.’ (p. 136)
  • ‘I stood with Marilyn, the so-called gender-bending pop prince, who was on before us. I couldn’t work out if he was nervous or aloof; he seemed to be both. We were looking at each other, but we didn’t speak. Maybe he thought we were provincial nobodies. I couldn’t tell. What I did know was that his record wasn’t very good but he looked totally gorgeous.’ (p. 188)
  • ‘I liked living in Earls Court. It was good being able to walk around the streets at all hours, and it was good that I liked being around Australians and gay guys too, as Earls Court in 1984 was swarming with backpacks and leather vests.’ (p. 201)
  • ‘There was a whole generation of American boys who were dissatisfied with the model of masculinity they had been expected to conform to and that was irrelevant and totally out of date. They saw in the British bands a way of being that was anti-macho and pro-androgyny, where the question of whether you were gay or straight didn’t matter at all.’ (p. 222 - 223)
  • ‘[Billy Bragg] came to my studio and liked the track [Johnny had been working on], and over the next few days we made the single ‘Sexuality’, with me producing. It was a great pop song with brilliant lyrics.’ (p. 310)

I think there are actually a few more, but those are the ones I tabbed!