haoles

A COUPLE OF FACTS

Hawaiian pizza is not a thing that most people like in Hawaii (I personally think it’s fuckin disgusting)

Pineapples are South American (possibly Brazillian) not Hawaiian

Wearing a “Hawaiian” shirt to a party does not automatically make it a luau nor does it make you Hawaiian

There is a difference between “Hawaiian” shirts and Aloha shirts

Authentic Hawaiian lei are made out of actual flowers and not that fucking neon plastic shit you haoles keep wearing

Hawaiian is an actual race ethnicity, therefore not all people from Hawaii are Hawaiian.

Hula is a fucking hard thing to master. Just because it looks pretty doesn’t mean it’s easy.

Hawaii is an illegally overthrown country that had it’s sovereignty violently ripped away from it in 1893 when our queen was held captive in her own home.

There is so much more to Hawaiian culture than this stupid neon beach party pineapple grass skirt tiki bullshit that you all keep spreading around. 

Please stop.

Goddammit

As much as I liked Lava, I was so disappointed in learning the names of the two volcanoes: uku and lele. While people not native to the Hawaiian islands think it’s adorable, the creators hardly did their fucking research. Uku means flea and lele means jumping. (Source: my Hawaiian boyfriend who took a Hawaiian language course at UH) An ukulele refers to the motion of the strings being plucked like a jumping flea. That has nothing to do with volcanoes and is hardly clever.

Yeah, my Hawaiian boyfriend was pretty irritated watching the short. “Freaking haoles misrepresenting our culture”.

We are losing a culture with movies like “Aloha” and this pixar short by either misrepresenting or having no representation of the culture at all.

I am super interested in anyone’s thoughts about the American and British and French magical school systems and the respective empires of those countries and how citizenship is handled/if it’s handled differently. Like, I realize: a bleak af topic where there are no good answers.

But it’s still something that interests me. Hawaii even gets a small shoutout in the opening sequence of FB as like a vacation spot for American witches, which raises for me some VERY REAL questions about how tf native Hawaiian witches feel about some haole wizards showing up and telling them how to run their communities. But that’s an issue that I imagine would come up for lots of communities. It’s unlikely that the International Statute of Secrecy signed in 1689 included input from, say, Polynesia or Japan or literally any group of people in North or South America.

Enforcement of the statue is inherently gonna be the Western wizarding world going “you can’t do that” at the entire rest of the planet.

And, like, historically, Western social norms are perpetuated primarily through education 

anyway wizard colonialism what’s up with that hmu

Went to Manoa Falls today...

Man, the place was filled with tourists.  Ridiculous.  They have tours there now apparently.  The tour guide was taking pictures for the couples/families.  Each time he took a picture, instead of saying “cheese”, this dude would say, “say Aloha”…ugh…

Also, while walking up in slippers, as I passed 2 tourists walking down, one whispered to the other, “those flip flops won’t last”… Love when the tourists know more than the locals…

Another annoying thing was no one saying thank you when you let them go as some of the trail was too muddy for 2 people to go  up and down at the same time. No aloha.

Lastly, on my way down, about 15 minutes from the falls, I was waiting by a tree for my friend.  About 10 feet in front of me where 2 haole people. A haole lady approached them and was like, “how far are we until we can see the waterfalls?”…the two haole guys shook their hands and said, “no speak English.”…Figured the lady would ask me the same question as I was about 10 feet ahead, but wasn’t with the two haole guys.  But nope, the lady just walked right by me.  I think I was too brown for her liking.  

haole-cop  asked:

Top five Steve and Danny scenes.

Oh. God. How do I even? Why am I your friend? I hate you so much. I’m totally going to break the rules and make this episodes, I think. Because it’s usually arcs that slay me.

1. This whole episode. This is everything that became everything. Steve’s noticing. Danny’s ranting. Chin’s gentle need. Kono’s bright eagerness. The laughing. The case work. Undercover. Laughing in the office. Danny & Grace. You can’t make me pick a scene, they are all perfect….but if I have to, the punch scene. 

2. This episode is my next favorite after. This is the first time Danny bucks all course and refuses any logic, going by his heart and his guts. And Steve’s “Oh” and this “I know you.” These were my next perfect. This whole growth episode for them, that makes Steve never question Danny’s loyalty ever again. 

3. You knew this was coming, right? You did. This whole episode, too. Danny down in the doorway, but especially this moment right here. How do I even. Danny is so happy and Steve has just gone through the first big shock of him possibly dying right there and then. 

4. Guh. This, okay? This episode where Danny goes to court for Grace for the last time, certain he’s about to be thrown off a cliff. Home of “You look good.” – “It’s for you. It’s all for you.” and “Come here. Come here.”–”I’m here.” and the important “ He’s actually the kind of father we all wish we had.“ and the Danny-Steve hug at the end, when Danny wins, and steps back and then surges forward.

5. This is probably my last truly favorite episode. Steve McGarrett rewrote the whole world and Danny Williams? Was the superhero who saved his Dad, and then he saved Steve, in real life, and he still told Steve the heart-shattering truth about that death all over again. 

******

(And one to grow on:

The follow-up scene connections. The difference from Steve leaving a “Dear Danno” letter on his desk and running off to Asia and getting STRAIGHT UP SCHOOLED by Danny about being an ass of human no matter if it had been professionally informative. 

To first calling Danny and leaving a message before leaving a country, if he was on the island and busy. To now, calling Danny even while he’s inland to tell Danny he has to leave the island/country. I’m serious. Steve doesn’t stop to tell anyone he’s gotta do what he’s gotta do.

Except Danny.) 

Many people have grown up to believe that the term haole comes from: hā (breath) ʻole (without)… But it is an incorrect and superficial rendering of the word. The word “haole” does not mean “without breath”… Traditional Hawaiian mele and mo'olelo never use that term in the context of being “breathless” nor as a marker of race.

A more accurate translation of the term “haole” might be “someone or something that is different or has different traits than one’s own”…

It was actually the descendants of American missionaries who first began to turn “haole” into a pejorative term because of politics. The concept of “race” as we know it today did not exist in the Hawaiian world view 200 years ago.

—  – Adam Keawe Manalo-Camp, on the term “Haole”
Uhane Hoa (Soul Mate) - Chapter 34

Written by Praemonitus_Praemunitus

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Summary:  This story came about in the wake of the disastrous 6x11 episode.  It has nothing to do with the actual episode, but the Steve/Danny storyline there pissed me off so much that the muse needed to find a way to erase the bad taste it left behind.  She needed her comfort food – lots of whumpage, lots of angst, and lots of proper Steve and Danny (the ones the show seemed to have mostly forgotten during the season that shall not be named).  So she came up with this.Oh and, yes, Danny gets to undercover in this one and change his appearance 

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Danny doesn’t look up at first when the door to Anuenue Auto Repair – a long-abandoned mechanic shop that serves as a front for Tassone’s operations – slides open and two of Tassone’s men burst in, dragging someone between them.  He remains where he is, sitting languidly on top of a rusted tool chest, his back against the wall, his hooded gaze kept disinterestedly on the floor before him.  His attention is on high alert, though, and he listens intently as the men begin to speak.

“We got ambushed, Boss,” one of the men huffs out, his voice strained with effort and frustration. “The damn cops were waiting for us by the docks.  Jackson and Logan are dead, and we barely made it out of there in one piece.”

“And this?” Tassone steps forward, his burly, 200-pound form looming over his two henchmen, shielding the slumped figure between them from Danny’s view.

“A 5-0 cop.  Joey here wounded one of theirs, some young cop, and we were gonna take him hostage, bring him here, make him sing for you a bit, if you know what I mean.  But then this one intervened.  Wanted to trade himself for the kid, so we let him.”  

Danny hears the sound of a boot connecting with flesh, followed by a muffled grunt of pain, but he’s no longer listening, no longer even registering anything for the loud roaring of blood in his ears.   No, he thinks, desperate, no, no, no…  He doesn’t need to see who it is now.  He knows. He just… knows.  And he feels sick.

Keep reading

Hapa

Soo… I was @ this museum the other day, and they had this great exhibit on race and racism, but then I noticed something that put me off… part of the exhibit was a series of photos called “The Hapa Project”, which consisted of portraits of mixed race people. For those of you who don’t know, Hapa is a pidgin word meaning “half”. It’s commonly used by mixed race hawaiians. For example, I am hapa haole, “half white”. Anyway, the reason why this project upset me is because the photographer wasn’t Hawaiian, and nor were all the subjects in the photos.. there were only two mixed Hawaiians in the whole line up… I was pretty steamed, bc like… so much of my culture has been consumed by non Hawaiians, and nothing we create FOR OURSELVES is ever left alone.. literally our own word for our people, “kanaka”, was turned into a slur for us!!! Just… if you’re not Hawaiian, don’t use hapa for yourself!! Literally just use half or mixed!! Our culture was almost wiped out by haloes, and we don’t need you stealing what’s left of it! Sorry this got so emotional, but this means a lot to me… Thank you, this has been psa…

Candid photo of me at prom a little over a year ago. I am kanaka maoli (native hawaiian) & white. Another way to say this is hapa haole, and I bring this up because folks in the asian community (folks without kanaka maoli ancestry) appropriate the word “hapa” far too often, and I want to bring awareness to that. 

I struggle greatly with my identity. My great-great grandmother was full native, but she never passed anything down to my mother (though my mother spent a lot of time with her.) When Hawai'i was illegally occupied and colonized by the U.S., ‘ōlelo Hawai'i was banned, hula was deemed the dance of the heathens and outlawed, and luau bastardized (among other things.) The tourist industry continues that bastardization to this day and the influx of haole moving to the islands kicks kanaka maoli off their own lands.

We are never taught about the colonization of Hawai'i in the U.S. I am trying to educate myself as best I can, I’m trying to teach myself my ancestors’ language, but resources are few and far between. I will forever strive to return to my kanaka maoli roots.

Danny Williams is this character that really grows on you. First a grumpy haole, then he lets you see his homesick soul, devoured by his love of his daughter, after that you see him looking death in the face and you realize that if he had to die so that this neanderthal partner of his could live, he’d do it. In his button-up shirt, slacks, and a tie. 

And then you lose the ground under your feet.

3

~~MY (THEY/THEIR) TRANS STORY~

I’m nb trans, and aporogender more specifically. Being fat and having big boobs in addition to dressing the way I want essentially means that I never pass in any situation. I have been told to just loose weight or bind so that some people will be more willing to respect my identity. I want my body to stay the way it is. Bodies don’t have gender identities, people do. Clothes don’t have gender identities, people do. My gender identity is valid regardless of what I look like or how I dress. Sorry, not sorry for being someone who takes more conscious effort to respect, the way I am and acknowledging that has been the defining thing that keeps me from ending my life.

OTHER IMPORTANT THINGS:

white/white-passing trans folx: can we please share more tpoc and especially dark trans black women? Also let’s not fetishize them. Let’s not talk about how attractive they are to us. They don’t exist for us to have something beautiful to behold.

Nonfat trans folx: please represent fat trans folx. Not just cute fat or sporty fat. Like actually go through the tags and rep all fat trans folx.

Able bodied trans folx: let us represent any disabled/mobility challenged trans folx. They are fucking valid and rarely if ever get representation. Also let’s not talk about what inspirations they are. Their life struggles are not there to make you feel better.

Financially stable trans folx: We need to represent poor trans folx. Money gives us access to soooo much that can help alleviate some of our pain or at least make it somewhat easier to manage.

TLDR: trans folx, represent other trans folx that are marginalized in ways you aren’t. While trans representation is abysmal enough, trans folx who are white and thin and able bodied and have financial stability are the vast majority of the kind of representation our community does get. Let’s do better.

*I definitely didn’t mention all the different levels of marginalization or marginalized identities within the trans community. Feel free to add to this, correct any mistakes I have made, etc.

** for those trans folx who are not wanting or not able to participate, you are in my thoughts today. You are not alone.

***I will go through the tag as much as I can, but also feel free to submit or tag me in things to make sure I reblog them.

We need to remember: Native Hawaiian Culture > Local Culture

I see this all the time from locals when issues on Hawaiian culture arise, where we think just cause we grew up around da culture, we have any say in how it should or shouldn’t be used.

Lucky we live HI but it doesn’t make us free from harming Native Hawaiians. We who do not have Hawaiian in our bloodlines, are haole to these lands in its original meaning. Yes, Hawai’i is a much more loving place than most and I am so proud to be from Hawai’i, but we are not free of racism, neo-colonialism, etc, including against Hawaiians.

When local culture says one thing but Hawaiian says another, Hawaiian culture wins, because it is HAWAIIAN CULTURE. We as locals, haoles, cannot combat the feelings and lived word of Hawaiians. Ainokea if we grew up with one thing and all of a sudden they saying different. Such as with Hapa. Local culture says its anyone who is mixed with anything. I grew up around that, you grew up around that. But that is false. That is erasure of the true meaning of Hapa, of what the identity of Hapa was born out of, of the Hawaiian culture attached to it. You are not Hapa if you are not part-Hawaiian, no matter what local culture says.

Hawaiian culture always comes before local culture. Respect the culture and respect Native Hawaiians.

Are y'all ready for something else Disney shoved in their new beautiful film Moana?

This is the Honi. Throughout the movie you see Moana exchange this with many people including her mother, Gramma Tala, and Te Ka. This is conducted by pressing the forehead/nose together and breathing in/out together. This is the exchanging of ha, the breath of life, in which the two share their mana- spiritual energy. This is often used when saying goodbye. Tbh, no one that I know does this that often anymore except on special occasions, sad. I just thought it was really cool how disney didn’t just leave it at a hug, they included this small detail.

An extra fun fact: The word for foreigner in Hawaiian is Haole (often used specifically for white ppl but can be extended to anyone not Hawaiian). I was told that this word came about because when the first people came from outside to visit our islands they used handshakes instead of the Honi. Therefore its ha (the breath of life) ole (without). (Honestly not 100% positive on this one but that is the literal meaning but this was something I was told by a kupuna so ¯\_(ツ)_/¯)