hans christian anderson

“Farewell, Princess Dagmar!
Grandeur and splendour await Thee;
Thy wedding wreath conceals an imperial crown.
Let God shine His sun on Thee and Thy new country; then, from the tears now evoked by parting,
a pearl will emerge!”

Hans Christian Anderson on the departure of Princess Dagmar of Denmark for Russia, where she would marry the future Emperor Alexander III.

📚 Author Themed Asks 📚

Because I love books and I CANNOT find an ask-prompt that satisfies my literary sensibilities AND my insatiable desire to troll. (Feel free to reblog). 

F. Scott Fitzgerald: How would you describe your ‘ideal’ brunch attire?

J.K. Rowling: What is your Hogwarts house? 

Donna Tartt: Which of the seven deadly sins are you most guilty of? 

Sylvia Plath: What is your favorite artistic medium?

Dostoevsky: Do you sleep feverishly or perhaps not at all? 

George R.R. Martin: Would you rather marry for wealth/power or murder for it?

J.R. Tolkien: What is your favorite magical creature? 

Jane Austen: What social faux-pas annoys you the most? 

Leo Tolstoy: Do you feel honor-bound to betray aspects of your formally bleak and morally corrupt life?

Hans Christian Anderson: What is your favorite fairytale?

Lord Byron: Are you narcissistic? 

JD Salinger: What is/was your worst subject in school?

Stephen King: What kind of curse would most effectively punish you for disrespecting the sanctity of some Native American burial grounds?

Oscar Wilde:  Would you sweep your rival a magnificently lethal leg at the top of a long flight of stairs? 

Charles Dickens:  How do you really feel about children? 

Edith Wharton: Do you love someone with every fiber of your being but respect them too much to touch them?  

Unusually Wondeful Spotify Playlists

Spotify is a fantastic place to find and discover new and old music, but it can also be a wonderful source of literature, audiobooks, and old radio shows. As a fan of all of these things, I have put together a list of some of my favourite non-musical playlists!

Scary Stories
Everything from Poe’s the Raven to some good, old-fashioned spooky late night radio! Very good for fans of podcasts/audiobooks like Lore, the No Sleep Podcast, etc.
Mythologies
Explore the stories behind your favourite myths including Greek gods and legends, Buddist mythologies, Britannic classics such as Arthur, and Egyptian Afterlife stories!
Love Poems
A beautiful collection of love poems from classic authors like Shakespeare, Walter Raleigh, and more!
Fairy Tales
A collection of full fairytales, all by Hans Christian Anderson and including The Mermaid, the Little Match Girl, and The Snow Queen!
The Adventures of Sherlock Homes
Select adventures of Londons Favourite Detective, and including some pretty amazing vintage radio adaptations!
The Essential Edgar Allen Poe
Great for research projects, this playlist includes the very best of the famously frightening poet Poe. (I love his work but lack the focus to read it on paper, so this playlist has been a godsend for several English projects and papers!)
Jane Austen
This is a massive playlist, including the entirety of the Pride and Prejudice audiobook, sense and sensibility, persuasion, and more! It also includes poetry and film scores from Austen adaptation.
The HP Lovecraft Compendium
23 hours and 14 minutes of love craft’s spokes and mind bending-est stories read aloud to you by some fantastic Narrators. 
A Hipsters Guide to Poetry
Ever seen and amazing poem quoted on Tumblr? It’s probably on this playlist. Sylvia Plath, Walt Whitman, and Robert Frost are all included.
SciFi Radio Dramas
Classic Science Fiction, like 20000 Leagues Under the Sea, 1984, and the War of the Worlds turned audio play for vintage radio and coming to your late night study session now!
Women’s Lit
Maya Angelou, Virginia Wolfe, Mary Shelly and More are included in this playlist, their poems and short stories. 
Irish Lit
Explore classical and contemporary Irish novels, short stories, plays, poems, and lore in both English and Irish Gaelic! Learn and practice the language at the same time as you discover the countries culture.
Shakespeare: The Poetry
His sonnets and poems, all of them, read aloud to you by a number of talented performers. 5 Hours of Shakespeare to put you in the writing mood!
French Literature
Hugo, Balzac, Dumas and more! French short stories and novels, now in audio form! Explore classics of French literature while you do laundry!
Shakespeare: The Comedies
Shakespeare can get notoriously gloomy, what with all the murdering and tragically ridiculous misunderstandings he features in some of this plays. But explore his bright, innocent, and summer side with hi classic comedies!
The Victorians
Explore the sensibility of the Victorian era through some if its best poetry: brooding, sceptical, romantic, whimsical, and nonsensical. 
Sylvia Plath
Everything you’ve ever wanted in a beautiful playlist. “Hear the voice that penned the poems.”-Spotify.
Poems for Spring
Beautiful poems read vintage and modern style, celebrating the innocent light that emerges in the spring!

So there you have it! This is by no means a complete list of playlists containing this kind of content, I know for a fact that most public domain books/ audiobooks are available on here! Happy Listening!

Fairy Tale Meme: 

9 Heroines - [Eliza from The Wild Swans]

Then Eliza went down the slope from the shore, and hid herself behind the bushes. The swans alighted quite close to her and flapped their great white wings. As soon as the sun had disappeared under the water, the feathers of the swans fell off, and eleven beautiful princes, Eliza’s brothers, stood near her. She uttered a loud cry, for, although they were very much changed, she knew them immediately.

The unicorn frappuccino is so popular that Starbucks is now developing fraps based on other mythical creatures.
  • Dragon frappuccino: Made with dragonfruit, cinnamon, and fiery hot chiles. A shameless ploy to acquire your gold.
  • Werewolf frappuccino: Seems like a normal chocolate frap (werewolves love chocolate) but the caffeine doesn't kick in until the next full moon. And boy howdy, does it kick in.
  • Mermaid frappuccino: Extra foam and sea salt caramel drizzle. Comes with a free Danish in honor of Hans Christian Anderson
  • Centaur frappuccino: Has an oatmeal raisin cookie crumble crust. Oats for the horse and raisins for the wine-loving human. Whipped cream is actually whipped Greek yogurt.
  • Fairy frappuccino: A delightful delicate flavor of honeysuckle and lavender, it has the unfortunate effect of making you fall in love with the next live creature that you see.
  • Pixie frappuccino: MIXED WITH TGE POWDER OF WITH 15 PIXIE STICKS
  • Elf frappuccino: Made with the most important food groups- candy, candy canes, candy corn, and syrup. Keebler cookie crumbles.
  • Hobbit frappuccino: Only served in size tall. Get one for breakfast and get a second one free!
  • Ogre frappuccino: Looks green and putrid on the outside, but has layers of different flavors that will Smash your Mouth
  • Zombie frappuccino: like a normal frap, but with SEVERAL extra shots of espresso
  • Wizard frappuccino: Butterbeer
  • Witch frappuccino: You'd think it would be the same as the wizard frap, but it has eye of newt and toe of frog #everydaysexism
  • Yeti frappuccino: Tastes like a lemon snow cone, with Himalayan pink salt
  • Alien frappuccino: They actually do have this in the Starbucks at one government building in New Mexico, but it's on the secret menu
  • Ghost frappuccino: Zero calories. Probably just blended ice.
  • Poltergeist frappuccino: Hurls itself against the wall after you pay for it
  • Vampire frappuccino: Blood. It's just blood.
3

The Wild Swans | Hans Christian Anderson

In a faraway kingdom, there lives a widowed King with his twelve children: eleven princes and one princess. One day, he decides to remarry. He marries a wicked queen who was a witch. Out of spite, the queen turns her eleven stepsons into swans and forces them to fly away. The queen then tries to bewitch their 15-year old sister Elisa, but Elisa’s goodness is too strong for this, so she has Elisa banished. The brothers carry Elisa to safety in a foreign land where she is out of harm’s way of her stepmother.

There, Elisa is guided by the queen of the fairies to gather nettles in graveyards; she knits these into shirts that will eventually help her brothers regain their human shapes. Elisa endures painfully blistered hands from nettle stings, and she must also take a vow of silence for the duration of her task, for speaking one word will kill her brothers. The king of another faraway land happens to come across the mute Elise and falls in love with her. He grants her a room in the castle where she continues her knitting. Eventually he proposes to crown her as his queen and wife, and she accepts.

However, the Archbishop is chagrined because he thinks Elisa is herself a witch, but the king will not believe him. One night Elisa runs out of nettles and is forced to collect more in a nearby church graveyard where the Archbishop is watching. He reports the incident to the king as proof of witchcraft. The statues of the saints shake their heads in protest, but the Archbishop misinterprets this sign as confirmation of Elisa’s guilt. The Archbishop orders to put Elisa on trial for witchcraft. She can speak no word in her defence and is sentenced to death by burning at the stake.

The brothers discover Elisa’s plight and try to speak to the king, but fail. Even as the tumbril bears Elisa away to execution, she continues knitting, determined to keep it up to the last moment of her life. This enrages the people, who are on the brink of snatching and destroying the shirts when the swans descend and rescue Elisa. The people (correctly) interpret this as a sign from Heaven that Elisa is innocent, but the executioner still makes ready for the burning. Then Elisa throws the shirts over the swans, and the brothers return to their human forms. The youngest brother retains one swan’s wing because Elise did not have time to finish the last sleeve. Elisa is now free to speak and tell the truth, but she faints from exhaustion, so her brothers explain. As they do so, the firewood around Elisa’s stake miraculously take root and burst into flowers. The king plucks the topmost flower and presents it to Elisa and they are married. (x)

Illustrations by Anne Yvonne Gilbert.

23.07.16 Its been two days too long since I uploaded a picture but because it’s the summer holidays I’m not doing any proper studying! This is a sneak peek to the stationery haul I’m doing next week! Coming up is a driving test masterpost as well! My mum and I have been cutting back some bushes at the front of my house and I want to put them in my flower press. Also, I bought this books of Hans Christian Anderson’s fairy tales from a charity shop and it has “Christmas 1953” written on the inside.