half flower

I am finding, suddenly, I have more garden flowers than I possibly know what to do with. I just filled an entire container of drying solution with no more than half of my Chamomile flowers which are currently flowering. That says nothing of the unbelievable amount of Borage that continues to flower every day, the pots of big, vibrant Calendula flowers. Help me I need a whole workshop just for drying.

ok so there was this post talking about how boys love flowers too and no one ever gets them any or like cares,,
SO we were doing awkward icebreakers in class and i decided to ask the guy next to me what his favorite flower was (half expecting him to say wut idk??) and he looked at me with a huge smile and said sunflowers and i think we should all just raise awareness that boys like flowers too

An outfit redesign for my fave. I feel betrayed that the uniforms don’t have actual cat ears like that would be the cutest thing. 

The Houses as Beautiful Things

Hufflepuff: The sunrise. People smiling. Light drifting through an open window. A half-finished painting. Tulips. Flowers woven into a braid. Hugs. Dandelion seeds drifting in the wind. The world after it rains. Hope.

Gryffindor: Laughter. Friends embracing after a long time apart. A sunset just before it fades to blue. Autumn leaves. Color—each and every shade. Candid photographs. The glow of light through a foggy window. Joy.

Ravenclaw: Poetry. Bells chiming. The soft breeze of early spring. Soft piano music. Snow angels. Eyes lighting up in excitement. Seashells and chips of sea glass. A locket with pictures inside. Art.

Slytherin: Morning dew. Roses climbing up a trellis. Constellations. A dancer lost in the music. Stained glass. Tears of joy. Handwritten letters with smeared ink. Embers glowing in wake of fire. Old forests. Love.

Kate is that mum who turns up to the school gates in a perfectly prepared ensemble with freshly washed hair. Her children always say please and thank you. She bakes pies and always has flowers in a vase and a full fruit bowl. Basically the exact opposite of how I would be as a mother

ACOMAF Demi-fae

Ladies and Gentlemen, I present to you my crack pot theory.

There are Demi-fae in ACOMAF. I am not sure how I missed this, over and over and over again. Actually I do, I just finished the TOG series, so the connection never lite up in my brain until @propshophannah​ pointed it out.

I’m going to start with Mama Archeron. I have the hardest time believing that she died of typhus. The idea never settled with me from my first read. I just cannot see this lady of the house slumming in camps or hanging out with wildlife where she would have been infected by louse. If the house was infested the family would have been infected. I will admit that I could be reading too much into this, but it has always nagged in the back of my mind. (313, TAR)

Mama Archeron died when Feyre was 8, Nesta is 11. Let’s say she had Nesta in her mid-twenties. She should have been about 35 when she “died”. What if she faked her death? What if it came to her attention that she was not aging as a human should be. With that said, what if Mama Archeron decided it was a good time to fake her death?

Stay with me here. If Mama Archeron is a Demi-fae, that means the girls are. Which would solve so many of the thoughts tugging in the back of my mind, such as:

1. Nesta is immune to glamour because of her strong will?  She is somehow immune to both Tamlin and Cassian’s glamour? Sorry, no. Tamlin was able to Glamour his entire supporting household from Feyre, Tamlin was able to keep Feyre hidden from Rhys until he noticed the third place setting at the table.

2. Feyre’s Prescience. I have a whole post that you can read about it but to sum it up Feyre has a bit of foresight. This is a girl that painted the Attor, although she had never seen him (182, TAR). Her visions of the moonstone palace (375, TAR). Those two little faeries in the garden (76, TAR), the bad feeling she gets from the queens (389, MAF). Feyre can also taste magic, since we only have Feyre’s view this could be something or nothing (45, TAR).

3. Elain, now I have comb these damn books and the only thing that came up Elain can talk anyone into anything it seems. It does not seem like much of a power to me, but it could lead to something greater.

4. The three sisters are mated to not just any fae, but powerful ones.

4a. Feyre was mated to Rhys, two years before UtM. She was a half-starved girl painting flowers on a table and her equal is the most powerful high lord in Prythian. I’m sorry, what?! Unless there was something more to the Feyre.

4b. Elain is Lucien’s mate. I know some of you will disagree with me, but I do not believe Lucien is as weak as he appears. He is a son of a high lord and I have a feeling that his family sensed that he was going to be heir.

4c. Wings and Embers hints that Nesta is mated with the strongest Illyrian, the commander of the Night Court armies. In this scene I also think that Nesta feels it too, when she accuses him of using some sort of fae magic.

5. The mortal queens. The sixth queen did not even show herself in Hybern. The sixth queen seems connected to the sisters. She is not ill and also not present to gain immortality from the Cauldron. What if the sixth queen is of a demi-fae realm?

7. The Suriel has one hell of an interest in Feyre.

The Etiquette of Herb-Gathering

As a practicing Witch and small-scale herbalist, I often find that when I’m out and about I’m also absentmindedly on the lookout for any new, interesting or useful herb species that might help me in my practice. I even carry a small clean jam jar and a sharp penknife in my handbag at all times for if I spot a herb I just can’t resist and need to take a cutting of it for my collection back home. However, while I’m avidly seeking out roadside feverfew or happily snipping cuttings of a rare cultivar of lavender or sage, I’m always acutely aware of why I call the etiquette of herb-gathering.

These are a few simple rules by which I suggest all foraging Witches, alchemists and herbalists should abide that dictate the correct course of action for those who seek to collect herbs from places other than their own gardens. They are mostly fairly common-sense, but a few are ones that might be overlooked, but which can actually be of profound importance!

I will list the rules below, but bear in mind that it’s not like this is some onerous obligation that must be fulfilled, and nor is it some sort of “Witchcraft commandment” or infallible and unchanging list of sacred laws. These are a few things that I created for my own usage, and nobody else is under any obligation to use them. If you choose to do so, I’ll be thrilled; if you find a way to improve them, please do reblog this post with your corrections! 

The Etiquette of Herb-Gathering

  1. Remember that all plants are living things, and if you harvest them too severely, they will die. This seems obvious, but you’d be shocked how many people forget! This is especially important when what you’re harvesting is the plant’s leaves - always remember that leaves are how plants make their food, so leave enough of them to enable the plant to keep growing strongly.

  2. Never forget that you may not be the only one foraging. Make sure that, when you harvest a wild growth of a herb, there may be others in the area who would also like to harvest that plant. Take only a little from a lot of patches, rather than using only two or three patches, but taking almost all of what is available at each one. This will not only ensure that other foragers can use that patch too, but will mean that when the patch regrows, you’ll know where to go back to in order to find it again instead of needing to hunt down a new patch each time.

  3. When foraging on another’s land, ask their permission first! This seems so straightforward, but sadly people forget that plants growing in other people’s gardens (yes, even their front lawn) are that person’s private property! Taking cuttings or fruits from plants on that property without the owner’s permission is legally theft, and can be punished just like shoplifting or stealing a bike from a railing. It also means that the owner will know that their plant is looking smaller because it’s been harvested, rather than them thinking it’s died or been eaten by some wild herbivore.

  4. Always cut stems at a diagonal angle. Never snip a stem so that it forms a circular, blunted end, because this can allow rainwater to build up on the surface of the cut. This rainwater can trap fungal spores, and cause the plant to get a serious fungal infection that may damage or even kill that whole patch. Instead, cut the stems at a roughly 45° angle, so that water beads up and rolls off more easily. 

  5. When collecting flowers, remember that other people like to look at wildflowers. Never take ALL the flowers from any wild plant, both because it prevents that plant from reproducing as it naturally wants to do, and because it means others who walk past the plant don’t get to see it’s beautiful blooms! If you own the plant, that’s another matter - you may WANT to snip off all flowers to prevent it from bolting, like with parsley. However, with wildflowers, always leave at least half the flowers on the plant so that it can continue to reproduce as nature intended.

  6. Never pick a plant you can’t identify with total certainty. Yet another seemingly-obvious one that is nevertheless often ignored. This is often quoted for fungi, because some fungi can be quite poisonous, but if anything it’s even worse for plants. The medicinally fabulous plant known as yarrow, Achillea millefolia, is a very useful plant and a common component of herbal medicines. However, it looks almost identical to spotted water-hemlock, a species of plant so deadly that one bite can kill you in 20 minutes. Make completely certain that all plants you collect are positively identified, and that you flag all plants with commonly-confused poisonous cousins for further identification later if you’re not 100% sure.

  7. Never harvest flowers from plants around beehives. Bees are one of the most important families in the natural world, being responsible for the pollination of tens of thousands of species of flowering plants all over the world and on every forested continent. Whilst most species of bees are solitary, and don’t form the large hives we assume are common to all bees, those that DO form vast colonies need similarly vast numbers of flowers to support themselves. When you come across a beehive, especially a boxed hive that’s clearly domesticated by humans, try to avoid harvesting any flowers from within 500 metres (about a third of a mile) around the hive(s). The hive needs all the nectar and pollen it can get, and due to the rising threat of colony collapse disorder the life of every single hive is a precious thing that must be preserved at all costs. It might be inconvenient for you, but it’s worth it.

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These are just a few of the major rules that I personally suggest all foragers and herb-gatherers take to heart. Remember that you’re not the only Witch who needs their supplies! Thank you for reading :)

– Juniper