haitian revolution

I keep seeing liberals talk about arming themselves to fight Trump

Yeah…..no, lets talk revolutions for a second here.  Armed revolution doesn’t usually work, the vast majority of the time the rebels rise up, get slaughtered, the regime gets more authoritarian in response, a lot of innocent people get killed, the remaining rebels quickly become local warlords and ruthless oppressors to survive, and the right wing authoritarian dictatorship stays in power for decades.  Particuarly when the Right wing has been spending the last 40 years stockpililng guns, vets and militia groups, so when conflict breaks out the left will just get fucking slaughtered (also you think people with shot guns can take on the US military? Really?)

Violent Revolutions usually only works if 

A) The ruling regime cannot maintain its military force.  In the French Revolution, the Monarchy had an economic crisis and couldn’t pay its soldiers, so no soldiers, no army, nobody to protect the regime from pissed off housewives with hatchets.  Violent Revolution is great when the otherside doesn’t have any weapons.  Which isn’t true in the US, the army is well payed, actually its over pays.

Also the French Revolution quickly discovered the joys of auto cannibalism and after decades of strife wound up with a military dictatorship 

B) The army joins the revolution.  In the Russian Revolution the Army joined up with the Communists in order to overthrow the Tsar/Provisional goverment because they were pissed about WWI.  Same with the successful Arab Spring revolts, if the army stands down or joins the people, then Violent Revolution is easy.  But ask the Rebels in Syria how well it works out if the whole army doesn’t defect

Also in most cases you wind up with a military dictatorship….whoops

C) The Regime is so incompetent/distracted that the Rebels have time to train, organize, equip, and drill an army without outside interference. 

In the second Chinese Revolution, Chiang Kai Shek’s KMT forces were distracted fighting the Warlords and then the Japanese, which allowed Mao’s CCP forces the time they needed to organize and create an army without outside interference.  I know this might be a shock to you at home who have been watching Alexander Nesky too much, but training armies is really really fucking hard, it is amazingly expensive, you need a huge logistically apperatius to make sure the army is fed, equipped, clothed, and housed, it takes forever to get an officer corp, chain of command, and army discipline going, and then you need to train the bloody thing.  If the people you are fighting are busy, then yeah that is possible, but if Washington State’s liberals start organizing an army, the US military or the National Guard or the State guard or just local police will come and crush them before they get their act together 

D) Foreign backing.  Revolutions are a lot easier when somebody else is footing the bill, and supplying you with the guns, materials, and military advisers to make revolution possible, But again….the United States has the largest military in the world, so that isn’t an option here

E) Occupying Territory.  If the oppressor is an outside country who have come in and taken your land, then yeah, you have a much better chance of rebllion, particularly if there is an ocean between you and them.  But this is really only possible if you have the full support of the populace, and if the enemy getting to you is a pain in the ass.  In the American Revolution, the three month travel time between Britain and the US allowed us the time to build up our own armies and form our own internal goverment.  The extremely hostile climate of Haiti, Cuba, Vietnam and the Middle East allowed for the same effect, but this wouldn’t be overthrowing a foreign threat, this would be a civil war, and even in the most blue states there are going to be loyalists, and while some of them are going to be Nazis, a lot of them are going to be normal people who either like Trump or just don’t want revolution, and you are going to have to decide what to do with them.  And if history is any guide, what you mr. liberal human rights rebel are going to choose will likely be rounding up anybody with non rebel sentiments and killing them so they won’t be 5th columnists.

   Also the vast majority of violent revolutions end in civil war or military dictatorship, and the more violent the conflict is, the worse the following regime is, so those of you who call for revolution may find your comrades putting a bullet in your brain once its over.  

Now violent revolution should still be an option on the table, but it should be the last resort option, because the moment we open that can of worms, we can’t close it again.  Once you have violent revolution, then Trump is given a go ahead to embrace much more violent oppressive and authoritarian methods that will make what we see here today look like a fucking utopia, and we will be up against the army, the police, the state guard, and all of the right wing militia gun nuts who have been spending decades preparing for this. This is to say nothing of loyalists who will take up arms against us.  Now if Trump suspects the constitution, the nall of that is worth it, everything is ok once the possibility of democracy is gone, but it hasn’t happened yet,   We are up against a man with a 36% approval rating, a 50% disapproval, , rating and a looming civil war with his own party, we can still win this thing non violently, and trust me, the guys on the right are just asking us to do it, because they know they have the advantage in that fight.  

Is “A Revolutionary Life” such a good subtitle for biographies?

Previously I’ve only known about “Robespierre: A Revolutionary Life” and “Toussaint Louverture: A Revolutionary Life”. In fact you can also buy:

Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life
Francis of Assisi: A Revolutionary Life
Red Princess: A Revolutionary Life
Lenin: A Revolutionary Life
Deng Xiaoping: A Revolutionary Life
José Martí: A Revolutionary Life
Mary Wollstonecraft: A Revolutionary Life

This is only what I found on amazon and not even counting “A Revolutionary Life: Biography of XXX” or “The Revolutionary Life of XXX”

… I mean, that sounds very original?

The god who created the sun which gives us light, who rouses the waves and rules the storm, though hidden in the clouds he watches us. He sees all that the white man does. The god of the white man inspires him with crime, but our god calls upon us to do good works. Our god who is good to us orders us to revenge our wrongs. He will direct our arms and aid us. Throw away the symbol of the god of the whites who has so often caused us to weep, and listen to the voice of liberty, which speaks in the heart of us all.
—  Dutty Boukman, praying at the Ceremony at the Bois Caïman, preceding the Haitian Revolution, 1791.

“The Haitian Revolution (1791–1804) was a slave revolt in the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which culminated in the elimination of slavery there and the founding of the Republic of Haiti. The Haitian Revolution was the only slave revolt which led to the founding of a state. Furthermore, it is generally considered the most successful slave rebellion ever to have occurred and as a defining moment in the histories of both Europe and the Americas. The rebellion began with a revolt of black African slaves in August 1791. It ended in November 1803 with the French defeat at the battle of Vertières. Haiti became an independent country on January 1, 1804.

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The Citadelle Laferriere.

Built by Haiti to defend against a French invasion that never came, it’s one of the largest and beautiful fortresses in the Western hemisphere.

  • Construction began in 1804, immediately after Haitian independence was achieved. The early generals of Haiti built 40 forts in the mountains.
  • Lighting struck one of the powder magazines in 1818, killing many soldiers and the fortress governor, King Henry’s brother-in-law, who is buried in the Citadelle.
  • The Citadelle Henry was abandoned in 1820 after the overthrow and suicide of King Henry.
  • Like the governor, Henry Christophe, too is buried in the Citadelle.
  • Length: 450 feet - Largest fortress in the Caribbean.
  • Number of cannon ports: 200
  • Highest wall: 130 feet - the prow of the Battery Croix-david.
  • Depth of thickest walls: 16 feet
  • Number of batteries: 8
  • Other features: defensive ditch and drawbridge, two powder magazines, casernes or catch basins which feed into rainwater into casernes, drainage aqueduct used for irrigating crops, storage and dungeon rooms, governor’s palace, military courtyard and barracks.
  • UNESCO World Heritage Site

I fully support Drexel professor George Ciccariello-Maher’s statements. They serve as a reminder that white genocide isn’t real and a common neo-Nazi term used to justify racist violence. Also the Haitian Revolution (what George is referencing) was the most successful slave revolt in nearly two millennia due to killing white slave owners.

Drexel’s reprimanding of George’s statement is a violation of free speech and pandering to white supremacists. George has long been an accomplice to the the queer and trans communities and we owe him our backing.

Confronting Black Jacobins: The U.S., the Haitian Revolution, and the Origins of the Dominican Republic 
By: Gerald Horne

The Haitian Revolution, the product of the first successful slave revolt, was truly world-historic in its impact. When Haiti declared independence in 1804, the leading powers—France, Great Britain, and Spain—suffered an ignominious defeat and the New World was remade. The island revolution also had a profound impact on Haiti’s mainland neighbor, the United States. Inspiring the enslaved and partisans of emancipation while striking terror throughout the Southern slaveocracy, it propelled the fledgling nation one step closer to civil war. Gerald Horne’s path breaking new work explores the complex and often fraught relationship between the United States and the island of Hispaniola. Giving particular attention to the responses of African Americans, Horne surveys the reaction in the United States to the revolutionary process in the nation that became Haiti, the splitting of the island in 1844, which led to the formation of the Dominican Republic, and the failed attempt by the United States to annex both in the 1870s.

Drawing upon a rich collection of archival and other primary source materials, Horne deftly weaves together a disparate array of voices—world leaders and diplomats, slaveholders, white abolitionists, and the freedom fighters he terms Black Jacobins. Horne at once illuminates the tangled conflicts of the colonial powers, the commercial interests and imperial ambitions of U.S. elites, and the brutality and tenacity of the American slaveholding class, while never losing sight of the freedom struggles of Africans both on the island and on the mainland, which sought the fulfillment of the emancipatory promise of 18th century republicanism.

magneto is the best villain of all time. any media. magneto is the villain you write papers about, the one you dissect over and over. he is the pinnacle of a sympathetic villain because he isn’t a villain. to mutants, to those ostracized, he is the hero, not the villain. he is made of the same violent revolution the haitian revolution, the american revolution, the french revolution all exemplify. he is an allegory for change, villified but sympathetic, and magneto is one of, if not the best, fictional characters ever created

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Jean-Pierre Boyer (15 February 1776 – 9 July 1850) was one of the leaders of the Haitian Revolution, and President of Haiti from 1818 to 1843. He reunited the north and south of Haiti in 1820 and also annexed newly independent Spanish Haiti (Santo Domingo), which brought all of Hispaniola under one Haitian government by 1822. Boyer managed to rule for the longest period of time of any of the revolutionary leaders of his generation.