hackleburg

Hackleburg Market ribbon cutting

Here are some scenes from the opening of Hackleburg Market on June 24. A Community Development Block Grant administered by ADECA helped the town rebuild the grocery store after the town was hit by a tornado in April 2011.

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Aerial footage of what once was the town of Hackleburg in north Alabama. Shot by Bill Castle of ABC 33/40, Birmingham on April 28, 2011. 

(You may want to turn the volume down–helicopter noise)

Box Tops 4 Hackleburg: Fundraising Effort

I was recently sent an email about participating in Box Tops 4 Hackleburg. Its mission is to collect as many Box Tops as possible to help out Hackleburg High School. The high school was destroyed in a matter of seconds by the tornadoes on April 27, 2011. These Box Tops are located on many of the food items (offered by General Mills and subsidiary companies) you may already have in your home. Each one is worth about 10 cents. That may not seem like much, but it can definitely add up. All that is being asked is that you send any Box Tops you may have to the address below:

P.O. Box 381764
Birmingham, AL 35238-1764

Visit the Facebook page for more information: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Box-Tops-4-Hackleburg/222434324452874

This is a picture of what Box Tops look like:

New Hackleburg Market grocery store ‘means everything’ to town nearly destroyed by 2011 tornado

The opening of a grocery store doesn’t usually attract a governor, a flock of TV news crews, state and local leaders and hundreds of residents, but it was a totally different story Wednesday morning in Hackleburg.  

The opening of Hackleburg Market marked a major step in the Marion County town’s recovery from a devastating tornado on April 27, 2011, that wiped out most of the area including the only grocery store. Governor Robert Bentley, ADECA Director Jim Byard Jr. and several ADECA staff members joined local leaders and residents to cut the ribbon on the new store.

A Community Development Block Grant administered by ADECA helped the town rebuild the grocery store. Hackleburg Mayor Whitey Cochran thanked Bentley and Byard as well as Shabbir Olia, Al Jones and other members of ADECA’s Community and Economic Development Division staff for their assistance.

“Everyone at ADECA has been so helpful and were from the very beginning of all this,” Cochran said. “If it weren’t for their help, we wouldn’t be here today. This is a good day for the people of Hackleburg.”

Cochran said that if a new store hadn’t been built, Hackleburg residents would have had to keep driving at least 15 minutes to the nearest grocery store and that could prove problematic for those who might not have transportation or even those buying perishable items. The building is owned by the town and leased to the operator.

Governor Bentley, Hackleburg Mayor Whitey Cochran, ADECA Director Jim Byard Jr. and others cut the ribbon to open Hackleburg Market.

Hackleburg Market manager Dennis Whitfield said this new store is bigger and better than what had come before. It will employ about 30 people, he said.

“There’s a wider selection now and we carry things like fresh meats and dairy products you might not be able to get at the (nearby) Dollar General,” he said. “This is a big step forward for the town and it means everything to the people who live here.

The store even includes a restaurant.

“This is my first time working with a restaurant inside a store, but it’s been a good experience so far,” Whitfield said.

Residents explore the restaurant area of the new store.

Working with ADECA, Bentley awarded a total of $8.5 million in disaster recovery CDBGs to help Hackelburg replace vital buildings and infrastructure, including Town Hall, the Police Station and some public housing, still under construction. He praised the efforts of everyone involved in the recovery.

“Hackleburg is a symbol of pride and rebuilding,” Bentley said. “Everyone here has helped bring Hackleburg back. This new market is a great addition to the town.”

Byard remarked on how far the town has come and the importance of working with local leaders to provide help where it was most needed.

“Hackleburg exemplifies ADECA’s mantra of local leadership and state partnership,” Byard said. “ADECA officials didn’t go there and tell them what they should or shouldn’t do with CDBG disaster supplemental funding. We awaited direction from the local leadership regarding their priorities and the priorities of the residents of Hackleburg.”

Byard speaks briefly to the crowd a the ribbon cutting. 

When Red Cross calls, volunteers spring to action to help

By Zak Koeske

Two Saturdays ago, John Breitweiser was visiting his daughter in York, when he got the call.

“Are you available to serve?” asked the Red Cross administrator on the other end. “We need you down here tomorrow.”

Mr. Breitweiser hopped in his car and made the five-hour drive home to South Park. Early the next morning, he was on a plane for Alabama, where he is spending the next few weeks aiding storm victims.

“The adrenaline builds,” the 63-year-old Vietnam veteran said of receiving the call to action. “With each deployment, you really don’t know what to expect.”

Mr. Breitweiser is one of 12 volunteer members of the Red Cross in Southwestern Pennsylvania who have been deployed to the South since tornadoes and floods struck the region March 31.

As a Red Cross Disaster Action Team member, Mr. Breitweiser spends about 24 hours a month providing immediate local emergency assistance, which typically means coordinating food, shelter and clothing accommodations for Western Pennsylvania fire victims.

He also makes himself available to the national chapter of the Red Cross. When a large-scale natural disaster strikes, he’s on call, ready to drop everything for two to three weeks at a time to serve wherever he is needed.

On May 15, Mr. Breitweiser joined the approximately 2,300 other Red Cross staff and volunteers from all 50 states who are providing immediate on-scene relief to disaster-affected towns in more than a dozen Southern states.

Southwestern Pennsylvania Red Cross communications director Brian Knavish said that, since late March, the humanitarian aid organization has served some 1.7 million meals and snacks, provided 40,000 health and mental health consultations, and opened more than 200 shelters.

Including Sunday’s tornado in Missouri, tornadoes and severe weather have claimed more than 480 lives across the nation this year, making it the deadliest year for tornado-related fatalities since 1953, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Alabama, where Mr. Breitweiser and three other Red Cross volunteers from the South Hills have been deployed since early April, has been the hardest hit with more than 300 reported deaths.

“I don’t think you can see any amount of pictures to describe what I’m seeing here,” Mr. Breitweiser said on the phone Friday from Rainsville, Ala.

“I was in Vietnam and I have seen some ugliness, but to see it on your own turf, it’s incredible. Lives here will never be the same; some have lost everything.”

For the past 10 days, Mr. Breitweiser and another Red Cross caseworker from Portland, Ore., have been traveling through what’s left of Rainsville, a tightknit town of 5,000 people in rural Alabama’s Dekalb County, looking for anyone they can help.

“We’re in the field interviewing people, seeing their needs and trying to facilitate their recovery,” said Mr. Breitweiser, who is on his first national deployment with the Red Cross.

Case workers, such as Mr. Breitweiser, assess the medical, legal and financial needs of victims and relay that information to the appropriate agencies. They also distribute comfort kits containing personal hygiene supplies and backpacks with blankets, flashlights, hand-crank rechargeable battery packs and first-aid kits.

Ken Brown, of Pleasant Hills, laid some of the groundwork in Rainsville that later enabled Mr. Breitweiser to tend to victims’ pressing needs.

Mr. Brown, on his second national Red Cross deployment, left Pittsburgh on April 30 in an emergency response vehicle and drove 800 miles to Alabama’s Red Cross headquarters in Birmingham, before being dispatched to Rainsville.

“These vehicles are like mobile feeding units,” Mr. Brown said of the emergency response vehicles. “They pick up food from kitchens and then distribute it to churches and just out into the community.”

In Rainsville, the vehicle was used as an emergency aid station to provide water, snacks and cleanup materials, said Mr. Brown, who’s volunteered with the Red Cross since 2008.

Mr. Brown and Carol Magargee, of Greenville, drove the direct path carved out by the twister and aided victims along the way.

“I felt like the show ‘Storm Chasers,’ where they chase a tornado,” he said. “Except I was chasing the damage of a tornado.”

For nine days, Mr. Brown said, they visited victims, listened to their harrowing stories and attended to their needs. A nurse and mental health professional tagged along to treat victims who had physical or psychological wounds.

Mr. Brown, who said he was inspired to volunteer with the Red Cross after watching television coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, expressed satisfaction with the job the Federal Emergency Management Agency was doing in Alabama, but he was especially impressed with the local community reaction.

“The community response was just unbelievable,” he said. “The people who [were unaffected] and could provide assistance – the fire departments, the rescue squads, churches – they were bringing out food right and left to the people.”

Jeanette Patsakis, of Mt. Lebanon, who deployed to Alabama on April 29, took part in Hurricane Katrina relief efforts through her church in 2005. She said that apart from the extreme flooding in post-Katrina Louisiana, the disaster scenes were similar – hundreds of displaced people and a path of destruction that spanned miles.

Although Ms. Patsakis, 72, is in her seventh year volunteering with the Southwestern Pennsylvania Red Cross, this was her first national deployment. Like Mr. Breitweiser, she served as a case worker, gathering victims’ information and passing it on to the appropriate agencies.

Ms. Patsakis spent time in both Hackleburg and Phil Campbell, two of the hardest-hit communities in Alabama. She said that only three buildings remained in the entire town of Hackleburg after the twister.

“There are places where they don’t know where the home went,” she said. “People find cars miles away. Trees that are 100 years old … thrown a half-mile away.”

Ms. Patsakis said this experience has been more mentally taxing than her time helping Katrina victims because of the immediacy with which she arrived on the scene.

“This was only a few days after it happened, where Katrina was like a month,” she said. “This was hands-on. People were still in shock.”

The victims aren’t the only casualties of the destruction. Mental anguish among relief workers is common. Volunteers are encouraged to call their families daily, and mental health professionals are always on hand to provide counseling.

Mr. Knavish said he expected more national deployments to be announced in coming days because of the Missouri tornado. And, each volunteer from the South Hills said he or she would welcome a return trip, if called.

“If I’m fortunate enough and humble enough to be deployed, I’ll go again,” Mr. Breitweiser said.

More information: redcross.org. To become a Red Cross volunteer: swpa.redcross.org or 412-263-3100.

Reconstructing Hackleburg: City continues to rebuild 3 years after April 27th storms

HACKLEBURG, Ala. (WIAT) — The same EF-5 tornado that killed a number of their neighbors tore apart their high school and elementary school. The town lost two anchor points and the students have been stuck in trailers ever since.

Before Tuscaloosa, before Pratt City, around three in the afternoon of April 27, 2011, a violent F-5 tornado hit Hackleburg in Marion County. National news agencies…

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al.com
Alabama Gov. Bentley removes Confederate flags from Capitol grounds
On the order of Gov. Robert Bentley, the Confederate battle flag which stands at the foot of the confederate memorial on the state Capitol grounds was taken down this morning. Two workers came out of the Capitol building about 8:20 a.m. and with no fanfare quickly and quietly took the flag down. They declined to answer questions.

Moments later Gov. Bentley emerged from the Capitol on his way to an appearance in Hackleburg. Asked if he had ordered the flag taken down, the governor said, “Yes I did.”

Alabama Gov. Bentley removes Confederate flags from Capitol grounds

On the order of Gov. Robert Bentley, the Confederate battle flag which stands at the foot of the confederate memorial on the state Capitol grounds was taken down this morning.

Two workers came out of the Capitol building about 8:20 a.m. and with no fanfare quickly and quietly took the flag down. They declined to answer questions.

Moments later Gov. Bentley emerged from the Capitol on his way to an appearance in Hackleburg. Asked if he had ordered the flag taken down, the governor said, “Yes I did.”

Asked his reasons for taking it down and if it included what happened in Charleston last week, the governor said, “Yes, partially this is about that. This is the right thing to do. We are facing some major issues in this state regarding the budget and other matters that we need to deal with. This had the potential to become a major distraction as we go forward. I have taxes to raise, we have work to do. And it was my decision that the flag needed to come down.”

http://bit.ly/1J5pZMm

Even Alabama is getting in on the whole “the Confederate flag is bad look” trend. The state’s governor, Robert Bentley, ordered that the rebel flag of the Confederacy (news flash: they lost the Civil War) on the Capitol grounds to be taken down. 

Reports Alabama.com:

Two workers came out of the Capitol building about 8:20 a.m. and with no fanfare quickly and quietly took the flag down. They declined to answer questions.

Moments later Gov. Bentley emerged from the Capitol on his way to an appearance in Hackleburg. Asked if he had ordered the flag taken down, the governor said, “Yes I did.”

Asked his reasons for taking it down and if it included what happened in Charleston last week, the governor said, “Yes, partially this is about that. This is the right thing to do. We are facing some major issues in this state regarding the budget and other matters that we need to deal with. This had the potential to become a major distraction as we go forward. I have taxes to raise, we have work to do. And it was my decision that the flag needed to come down.”

Although Nikki Haley called for the Confederate flag to be removed from Charleston’s capitol grounds a couple of days ago, it still needs to be approved, which reportedly will take weeks.

We’ve seen such swindles before: look up “with all deliberate speed.”

See more images of this particular flag getting the heave ho in the following pages. Good riddance.

Alabama’s governor orders the confederate flag taken down from the state Capitol, calling it a distraction. #change pic.twitter.com/jFQHlkCKgV

— Joy Reid (@JoyAnnReid) June 24, 2015

Photo: AP Photo

The post Confederate Flag Removed From Alabama Capitol Grounds [Photos] appeared first on Hip-Hop Wired.

Alabama Gov. Bentley removes Confederate flags from Capitol grounds

On the order of Gov. Robert Bentley, the Confederate battle flag which stands at the foot of the confederate memorial on the state Capitol grounds was taken down this morning.

Two workers came out of the Capitol building about 8:20 a.m. and with no fanfare quickly and quietly took the flag down. They declined to answer questions.

Moments later Gov. Bentley emerged from the Capitol on his way to an appearance in Hackleburg. Asked if he had ordered the flag taken down, the governor said, “Yes I did.”

Asked his reasons for taking it down and if it included what happened in Charleston last week, the governor said, “Yes, partially this is about that. This is the right thing to do. We are facing some major issues in this state regarding the budget and other matters that we need to deal with. This had the potential to become a major distraction as we go forward. I have taxes to raise, we have work to do. And it was my decision that the flag needed to come down.”

Bentley said before he made the final decision he checked to see if there were any impediments in the law or state policy that would prevent him from taking down the flag and found none, so he acted.

After the battle flag – which is at the center of the controversy – was gone, workers began removing three other Civil War era flags.

They are the First National Confederate Flag, commonly preferred to as the “Stars and Bars;” the second flag is the Second National Confederate Flag, more commonly known as the “Stainless Banner;” and the last flag standing is the Third National Confederate Flag.

About 90 minutes after the battle flag was removed, about a half dozen workers removed those remaining flags. The workers did not answer questions.

The view of the flags on the huge monument has been obstructed by the heavy trees at the site which is just at the bottom of the steps leading to the main doors of the Capitol’s north entrance and is surrounded by a wrought iron fence. It is a very short walk from the governor’s office.

The cornerstone of the Confederate monument was laid by Jefferson Davis, president of the CSA (Confederate States of

Alabama guv yanks Confederate flags from Capitol

(BIRMINGHAM NEWS) On the order of Gov. Robert Bentley, the Confederate battle flag which stands at the foot of the confederate memorial on the state Capitol grounds was taken down this morning.

Two workers came out of the Capitol building about 8:20 a.m. and with no fanfare quickly and quietly took the flag down. They declined to answer questions.

Moments later Gov. Bentley emerged from the Capitol on his way to an appearance in Hackleburg. Asked if he had ordered the flag taken down, the governor said, “Yes I did.”


from PropagandaGuard https://propagandaguard.wordpress.com/2015/06/24/alabama-guv-yanks-confederate-flags-from-capitol/




from WordPress https://toddmsiebert.wordpress.com/2015/06/24/alabama-guv-yanks-confederate-flags-from-capitol/
Alabama guv yanks Confederate flags from Capitol

(BIRMINGHAM NEWS) On the order of Gov. Robert Bentley, the Confederate battle flag which stands at the foot of the confederate memorial on the state Capitol grounds was taken down this morning.

Two workers came out of the Capitol building about 8:20 a.m. and with no fanfare quickly and quietly took the flag down. They declined to answer questions.

Moments later Gov. Bentley emerged from the Capitol on his way to an appearance in Hackleburg. Asked if he had ordered the flag taken down, the governor said, “Yes I did.”


from http://ift.tt/1eHvXJx
Alabama guv yanks Confederate flags from Capitol

(BIRMINGHAM NEWS) On the order of Gov. Robert Bentley, the Confederate battle flag which stands at the foot of the confederate memorial on the state Capitol grounds was taken down this morning.

Two workers came out of the Capitol building about 8:20 a.m. and with no fanfare quickly and quietly took the flag down. They declined to answer questions.

Moments later Gov. Bentley emerged from the Capitol on his way to an appearance in Hackleburg. Asked if he had ordered the flag taken down, the governor said, “Yes I did.”


from Propaganda Guard http://propguard.tumblr.com/post/122344974073
Alabama guv yanks Confederate flags from Capitol

(BIRMINGHAM NEWS) On the order of Gov. Robert Bentley, the Confederate battle flag which stands at the foot of the confederate memorial on the state Capitol grounds was taken down this morning.

Two workers came out of the Capitol building about 8:20 a.m. and with no fanfare quickly and quietly took the flag down. They declined to answer questions.

Moments later Gov. Bentley emerged from the Capitol on his way to an appearance in Hackleburg. Asked if he had ordered the flag taken down, the governor said, “Yes I did.”

Confederate flag removed from Alabama Capitol grounds - http://ift.tt/1ceQiBD

Mashable -

A Confederate flag that flew over the grounds of the Alabama Capitol in Montgomery was taken down with little fanfare Wednesday morning on orders of the state’s governor, according to a new report.

See also: Not just South Carolina: Leaders across U.S. call for removal of Confederate monuments

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley, a Republican, said it was “the right thing to do,” Al.com reported.

Two workers came out of the Capitol building about 8:20 a.m. and with no fanfare quickly and quietly took the flag down. They declined to answer questions.

Moments later Gov. Bentley emerged from the Capitol on his way to an appearance in Hackleburg. Asked if he had ordered the flag taken down, the governor said, “Yes I did.”

Asked his reasons for taking it down and if it included what happened in Charleston last week, the governor said, “Yes, partially this is about that. This is the right thing to do. We are facing some major issues in this state regarding the budget and other matters that we need to deal with. This had the potential to become a major distraction as we go forward. I have taxes to raise, we have work to do. And it was my decision that the flag needed to come down.” Read more…

More about Alabama, Us World, Politics, Us, and History

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Confederate flag removed from Alabama Capitol grounds

A Confederate flag that flew over the grounds of the Alabama Capitol in Montgomery was taken down with little fanfare Wednesday morning on orders of the state’s governor, according to a new report.

See also: Not just South Carolina: Leaders across U.S. call for removal of Confederate monuments

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley, a Republican, said it was “the right thing to do,” Al.com reported.

Two workers came out of the Capitol building about 8:20 a.m. and with no fanfare quickly and quietly took the flag down. They declined to answer questions.

Moments later Gov. Bentley emerged from the Capitol on his way to an appearance in Hackleburg. Asked if he had ordered the flag taken down, the governor said, “Yes I did.”

Asked his reasons for taking it down and if it included what happened in Charleston last week, the governor said, “Yes, partially this is about that. This is the right thing to do. We are facing some major issues in this state regarding the budget and other matters that we need to deal with. This had the potential to become a major distraction as we go forward. I have taxes to raise, we have work to do. And it was my decision that the flag needed to come down.” Read more…

More about Alabama, Us World, Politics, Us, and History



from our friends at Mashable http://ift.tt/1CsLMZy