habitat

Habitat.

Some people might look at this and say there’s nothing there. But let me tell you—everything is there. Places like, these spots of wildness, are where life is going on full tilt. We need as much of this as we can get.

The grass is always greener! March marks Seagrass Awareness Month, a time to recognize the importance of healthy seagrass beds in maintaining our ocean’s health. 

In places like Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, eelgrass – a type of seagrass – provides a primary food source for a variety of marine animals, and protection for others. In addition, seagrasses can help filter pollutants out of the water and prevent erosion, keeping the water column healthy and clear. 

Here, otters raft together in Elkhorn Slough, a tidal salt marsh in Monterey Bay, where they provide a critical service to eelgrass beds. Otters help protect these precious grasses by munching on predators like crabs that would otherwise threaten eelgrass beds. 

What will you do to make like an otter and protect seagrasses? 

(Photo: Becky Stamksi/NOAA)

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British Invasion of the Congo

Although the Belgians Colonised the Congo,In 1911 they gave a British Man ; William Lever, a concession to develop large scale productions of Palm oil in the Congo.

In the book Lord Leverhulme’s Ghosts: Colonial Exploitation in the Congo by Jules Marchal  the author states: “Leverhulme set up a private kingdom reliant on the horrific Belgian system of forced labour, a program that reduced the population of Congo by half and accounted for more deaths than the Nazi holocaust.Formal parliamentary investigations were called for by members of the Belgian Socialist Party, but despite their work the practice of forced labour continued until independence in 1960.

Deep beneath the waves off the coast of Central California lies the technicolor marvel of Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary! 

Surrounded by soft sediments of the continental shelf seafloor, Cordell Bank emerges with a rocky habitat, providing home to colorful and abundant invertebrates, algae, and fishes. Here, a research diver pauses behind a colony of strawberry anemones and other invertebrates. 

(Photo: Joe Hoyt/NOAA)

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PSA: Lin-Manuel Miranda sells bird real estate.

….And his song is “very convincing”

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natgeo Video by @joelsartore. An endangered horned marsupial frog at the El Valle Amphibian Conservation Center. These frogs have completely disappeared from many of their original habitats. It is thought that this species is extremely susceptible to chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease in amphibians caused by the chytrid fungus that is wiping out frogs in Latin America. This individual is part of a conservation breeding colony maintained by the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project @amphibianrescue in Panama. To see still images of this frog check out @joelsartore.

The Crustacean Invasion: European green crabs are native to western Europe and northwest Africa, but have invaded ecosystems in every continent but Antarctica. 

Because they disperse over long distances during their larval stage and aren’t exactly picky eaters (these crabs will eat clams, shrimp, and other invertebrates!), European green crabs are quite successful at invading new territories. Where they establish new populations, these crabs threaten shellfish fisheries and ecosystem health. 

For reasons not yet well known, European green crabs have been particularly successful in Seadrift Lagoon, a manmade lagoon near San Francisco that is tidally linked to Bolinas Lagoon. There, they’ve established the largest West Coast concentration in a closed marine ecosystem! But folks at Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary are hard at work removing these invasive crabs. Since 2009, teams have worked to remove tens of thousands of crabs from the lagoon, and their work continues. 

(Photo: Kate Bimrose/NOAA)