ha! that was just expression

10

— 930302

Happy Birthday to Topp Dogg’s main vocalist and ray of sunshine, Yu Sangdo♡

10

Hiddlesweek Day 4: Favourite Role

  • The new boss - Jaguar campaign
4

I’ve been cackling over this fanfic by @thereluctantinquisitor since yesterday, I had to draw something for it. Guys do yourself a favor and go read it (Sorry if I butchered your dialogues >_>) 

Let’s take some time to analyze this small bit from the episode 10 preview

Not sure if it’s been done already. You guys are hella fast when it comes to analyzing scenes holy wow.

So at the end of the preview for episode 10, we see Yuri and Viktor standing/sitting/whatever face to face, right? Okay, so what I noticed, is that Yuri, at first, is staring down.

Then he blinks and looks up at Viktor. In my opinion, his facial expression makes it look as if he’s surprised. Not in a shocked way, but more like in a shy way, if that makes sense?

He’s blushing harder than we’ve ever seen him blush, too.

Then we see Viktor. Viktor has a really gentle and adoring expression on his face. He, just like Yuri, is also looking down, and still looking down by the time Yuri has focused his own eyes on Viktor’s face. 

So what I’m thinking, is that Viktor gave Yuri something. A present, perhaps. Because in the voiceover, Viktor was talking about Christmas presents. Yuri’s birthday is also coming up. So maybe a Christmas present or birthday present.

Looking at their faces, this isn’t just an ordinary present. It’s not some fancy piece of clothing, it’s not katsudon, and it sure as heck is not a pair of socks or an ugly Christmas sweater. I’m thinking it’s something much more intimate. Like a ring.

Or maybe it’s not just a simple Christmas or Birthday present. Maybe it’s a love confession. But if it were, then what could the two be staring down at? Maybe Viktor is holding Yuri’s hands while confessing?

Still, the movements and body language are rather giving me the idea that Viktor is slipping a ring around Yuri’s finger. Realistically, this seems a bit early to be an actual marriage proposal. I mean, it’s totally possible! But despite the whole proposal talk in ep. 9, I’m not sure if their relationship is already at the point where a marriage proposal is the obvious next step. I wouldn’t mind those two getting married already tho lel 

Maybe it’s a love confession where Viktor gives Yuri a ring or something as a token of their relationship/love? Not quite like an engagement ring. but more like a ‘this ring will show everyone that we belong to one another’ kinda ring? 

Or maybe they’re just talking about a touchy subject and Viktor is too shy/embarassed to look at Yuri, but Yuri feels brave enough to look up at Viktor. Viktor hasen’t ever really shown his vulnerable side towards Yuri, not in the anime at least. So this makes sense imo. Maybe all this is just me doing some good old wishful thinking.

But whatever is happening in that preview, we know it’s gonna be good anyway. I mean c’mon, that body language, THOSE FACIAL EXPRESSIONS.

I can’t wait ‘till next week.

8

buck being all protective over alfonso and steve being… well, steve.

i was being dumb earlier so this happened

‘Why do Feysand and Rowaelin not get treated exactly the same way in the narrative/look exactly the same/why does Rhys do some things Rowan doesn’t/why is Rowan allowed to do some things that the narrative addresses with Rhys and points out that they’re not good’? repeat forever. 

Because there is not one model of a good/healthy relationship. It does not work Feyrhys = healthy; everything else = toxic. 

Because women are not carbon copies of one another. We have different tastes. We have different likes. We have different needs in a relationship. We are our own individual people and we need our partners to respond to our personal preferences, likes, and dislikes and not simply have someone behave exactly the same way to every single person they’re with. 

Feyre dislikes feeling smothered or not having her full freedom and independence. As such, when the mating bond snaps into place between her and Rhys, Rhys carefully explains to her why he feels protective and territorial and that he is working to stop doing that. Because she has been in an abusive relationship before where someone has done these things to an unhealthy level and is uncomfortable with any minor repetition of them. Rhys addresses her personal concerns and her personal needs and that is why the narrative picks this out and unpicks it and explains it with Rhys but not with Rowan. 

Aelin is a completely different character with a completely different backstory, a completely different set of insecurities and a completely different set of needs and Rowan responds to them. Aelin does not have a problem with Rowan being territorial or protective over, not in the way Feyre does. It might be a vague annoyance sometimes (AT THE VERY MOST) and even then she’s dismissive of it and it amuses her and it is never taken too far to the point that it restricts her freedom/the choices she can make/the things that she can do. And she is not in any way triggered by it as she has not experienced the same kind of abuse that Feyre has. 

Territorial behaviour of the kind that comes natural to the fae is not in itself abusive/unhealthy. Protectiveness over the people that you care about is not in itself unhealthy/abusive. What would be unhealthy would be to expect men to treat every single woman he meets/is with exactly the same way because it suits one single woman. That is reductive and frankly insulting.

 I have no doubt that Rhys would behave differently with Aelin and that Rowan would behave differently with Feyre because they are individual people with individual needs and desires and expecting Aelin to be treated the same as Feyre because this is apparently the only standard of a healthy relationship is frankly a little bit misoygnistic because, shock horror, not all women think the same/feel the same/like/dislike the same things. Isn’t that amazing? It’s as though we’re real people who know what we like and don’t like and expect the people closest to us to respect that and respond accordingly. Incredible. 

TL;DR Stop comparing Feyrhys and Rowaelin. Especially if the purpose of this is to say ‘Rhys does x, this is good for Feyre and makes their relationship healthy. Rowan does not do x, therefore this is bad for Aelin and makes their relationship unhealthy’ because, newsflash, that’s not the way it works

There is no one way to have a good, positive relationship. In fact that thinking in itself is unhealthy. Different people have different needs and their partners should therefore behave differently so suit those needs, not just mirror another’s behaviour because it has been deemed ‘The Most Healthy And Appropriate Way To Behave With Women’. Because. Guess what? Not all women are going to want/respond well to that and you ignoring their needs and wants in order to try and fulfil this idealistic idea of a perfect relationship is not healthy. Rowan is responding to what Aelin personally wants/needs/feels comfortable with. He is not Rhys, he does not behave like Rhys and that is completely okay because Aelin is not Feyre and does not need him to do that for her. 

I’m so happy about the “Keith is actually a very happy person inside” thing bc like, it has always been my headcanon that he just doesn’t vary his tone/expression much but he isn’t actually a grump & that if you see him staring off into space he is not brooding he’s just thinking about how the plot of Frozen makes no sense or how weird it is that there are so many different types of sand.

All Hail the Queen

Okay I’ve been talking about the ladies a lot, and Its about time I talk about the men.

We love them. A LOT.

We love them because Sarah J Maas has written male characters that express emotion. They aren’t just idiot warriors who swing around swords and look good all day. They are raw characters, they experience pain and remorse. They TALK about how they feel. They aren’t afraid to love. They aren’t afraid to let their female companions take the rains in a fight. They see both sexes equally. We love the men in her books because they are what men should strive to be. Equal and open. ❤

Katara: It’s not magic. It’s waterbending, and it’s-
Sokka: Yeah, yeah, an ancient art unique to our culture, blah blah blah. Look, I’m just saying that if I had weird powers, I’d keep my weirdness to myself. 

So I wanted to talk a little about Katara, because I think we often focus on her grief for her mother, and forget her relationship to her culture, and her experience of the Southern Water Tribe genocide (unlike the Air Nomads genocide, which was for the greater part over after four big terrifyingly effective simultaneous strikes, this one took place over a long length of time - more than 40 years? 50? - and it wasn’t total, but it definitely was one. genocide = the deliberate and systematic extermination of a national, racial, political, or cultural group, fwiw)

(Kanna’s village - before and after)

All of the Southern water benders were exterminated or taken away to rot in prison (where they all died eventually except for Hama). Katara was born the only bender left in the whole South Pole. Then when she was eight years old, she survived a raid that was meant to kill her, but took her mother instead (she probably was too young to realize that, to her it must have been a question mark up until she met Yon Rha - gratuitous cruelty? Why her mother in particular? They took nothing else!).

So Katara from a young age had a double burden to bear: that of her mother, and the legacy of her bending (and she was shown as painfully aware of her situation and what it meant on both front). But here’s the thing: Katara could be a mother, she was naturally good at it, and her grandmother could teach her what she didn’t already knew. Her family and tribe demanded that of her, they needed her to be that for them (especially after her father and the rest of the men basically abandoned them). However, there was no one left to teach her how to waterbend - she had almost no hope of ever becoming a master without formal training, her brother thought it was silly and weird and let her know, her grandmother thought it was a waste of time. But she kept practicing, because she knew how important it was, to her and to her tribe, that she kept trying (as the only one left who could).

(…an ancient art unique to our culture, blah blah blah…)

(Of course she would obsess over that waterbending scroll)

When she gets to the North Pole, she meets Pakku, and with him the opportunity of finally becoming a true master. But because she is a girl, he judges her unworthy. He judges her, the only remaining southern waterbender, unworthy of carrying on their culture. The Fire Nation didn’t care about the gender of their prisoners, men and women - they all fought side by side for their freedom in the South, and they were all taken away to the last one, and killed to the last one. In the South, the women had the choice to learn how to fight, or be defenseless. And privileged master Pakku couldn’t possible realize the extend of what he was denying her in that moment.

Katara had to prove herself, she had to earn her right to these teachings. And if she had been less good or less stubborn or not Kanna’s granddaughter - well the North would have refused their sister-tribe the power to use their common cultural heritage to fight back against the nation that destroyed them.

(It’s sexist and terrible.)

Meh, thankfully, she was that good, stubborn, and Kanna’s granddaughter, and she did get to become a master.

Good.

But, of course, her story doesn’t end here, and wrt her culture, the next chapter is a much more traumatizing experience. In the Fire Nation, she meets another master. This time it’s an old woman from the South like her (“You’re a waterbender! I’ve never met another waterbender from our tribe!”), and she is, ah, more than willing to help her.

Look how happy Katara looks at the idea to learn from her in particular:

Katara: I can’t tell you what it means to meet you. It’s an honor! You’re a hero.
Hama: I never thought I’d meet another southern waterbender. I‘d like to teach you what I know so that you can carry on the southern tradition when I’m gone.
Katara: Yes! Yes, of course! To learn about my heritage… it would mean everything to me.

But when Hama starts her lesson, the techniques she teaches have been obviously developed with one goal in mind: survival in enemy territory. They can’t possibly have been invented in the South Pole, where water is abundant everywhere. They are deadly and cruel, and the damage they do to the environment leaves Katara sad and uncomfortable, but Hama waves that off as unimportant. It doesn’t matter, she doesn’t have the time to worry about flowers or beauty or nature. To her that peace and beauty is probably just an illusion anyway, a lie: years after her escape she is still living the war, and war is ugly and rotten and messy (her world is ugly and rotten and messy - this is her comfort zone).

The last technique she teaches Katara is bloodbending. She forces Katara to learn something she finds disgusting, repulsive (just like Hama was forced to learn?) by torturing her (Hama was tortured), by overpowering her, invading her, making her lose control over her own body, bending her blood (Hama herself is clinging to the last remain of control she managed to get back after rotting in prison for years), and finally by threatening to have the two people she cares most about in the world kill each other right under her eyes (Hama lost everyone too, she had to say goodbye).

(Katara: But, to reach inside someone and control them? I don’t know if I want that kind of power.
Hama: The choice is not yours. The power exists…and it’s your duty to use the gifts you’ve been given to win this war. Katara, they tried to wipe us out, our entire culture… your mother!
Katara: I know.
Hama: Then you should understand what I’m talking about. We’re the last Waterbenders of the Southern Tribe. We have to fight these people whenever we can. Wherever they are, with any means necessary!
Katara: It’s you. You’re the one who’s making people disappear during the full moons.
Hama: They threw me in prison to rot, along with my brothers and sisters. They deserve the same. You must carry on my work.)

And this, this, is the only truly southern waterbending Katara is ever going to learn. This is her tribe’s bending heritage, what’s left of it: blood, grief, suffering, hatred, loss of control over both your body and mind (because it’s terrible, but I think that’s what’s implied by the show: bloodbending makes you lose your mind. Hama’s only mean of regaining physical freedom ended up trapping her in another nightmare). Hama gifts her with a power she despises (but will use anyway in her darkest hour when she loses control) and a philosophy of violence and revenge.

Katara chose peace and forgiveness. As an adult, she will have bloodbending outlawed, she will become the greatest healer in the world, and she’ll teach her daughter, the next avatar, probably many others. These choices matter, and we should talk about them with that background in mind. Katara redefined her heritage - or rather she created a new one for herself: she refused the condition that was forced upon her (bloodbender) and ensured nobody could legally do to someone else what Hama did to her (and it’s implied this law is valid anywhere in the world). She transmitted Pakku’s warrior teachings, the ones she fought for, to the next generations (and did a great job of it!), but she also taught them how to heal, refusing to separate the arts as in Northern Water Tribe tradition - and healing was something she discovered by herself, that she felt was always a part of her. At that, she became the universally acknowledged best. Her legacy, despite everything that happened to her, will never be one of violence.

tl;dr: Katara is one of the strongest fictional characters ever created bye