h: archetypes

The Signs as Common Archetypes

ARIES -  The Hero

Motto: Where there’s a will, there’s a way
Core desire: to prove one’s worth through courageous acts
Goal: expert mastery in a way that improves the world
Greatest fear: weakness, vulnerability, being a “chicken”
Strategy: to be as strong and competent as possible
Weakness: arrogance, always needing another battle to fight
Talent: competence and courage
The Hero is also known as: The warrior, crusader, rescuer, superhero, the soldier, dragon slayer, the winner and the team player.

TAURUS -  The Magician

Motto: I make things happen.
Core desire: understanding the fundamental laws of the universe
Goal: to make dreams come true
Greatest fear: unintended negative consequences
Strategy: develop a vision and live by it
Weakness: becoming manipulative
Talent: finding win-win solutions
The Magician is also known as: The visionary, catalyst, inventor, charismatic leader, shaman, healer, medicine man.

GEMINI -  The Jester

Motto: You only live once
Core desire: to live in the moment with full enjoyment
Goal: to have a great time and lighten up the world
Greatest fear: being bored or boring others
Strategy: play, make jokes, be funny
Weakness: frivolity, wasting time
Talent: joy
The Jester is also known as: The fool, trickster, joker, practical joker or comedian.

CANCER -  The Caregiver

Motto: Love your neighbour as yourself
Core desire: to protect and care for others
Goal: to help others
Greatest fear: selfishness and ingratitude
Strategy: doing things for others
Weakness: martyrdom and being exploited
Talent: compassion, generosity
The Caregiver is also known as: The saint, altruist, parent, helper, supporter.

LEO -  The Lover

Motto: You’re the only one
Core desire: intimacy and experience
Goal: being in a relationship with the people, work and surroundings they love
Greatest fear: being alone, a wallflower, unwanted, unloved
Strategy: to become more and more physically and emotionally attractive
Weakness: outward-directed desire to please others at risk of losing own identity
Talent: passion, gratitude, appreciation, and commitment
The Lover is also known as: The partner, friend, intimate, enthusiast, sensualist, spouse, team-builder.

VIRGO - The Innocent

Motto: Free to be you and me
Core desire: to get to paradise
Goal: to be happy
Greatest fear: to be punished for doing something bad or wrong
Strategy: to do things right
Weakness: boring for all their naive innocence
Talent: faith and optimism
The Innocent is also known as: Utopian, traditionalist, naive, mystic, saint, romantic, dreamer.

LIBRA -  The Orphan/Regular Guy or Gal

Motto: All men and women are created equal
Core Desire: connecting with others
Goal: to belong
Greatest fear: to be left out or to stand out from the crowd
Strategy: develop ordinary solid virtues, be down to earth, the common touch
Weakness: losing one’s own self in an effort to blend in or for the sake of superficial relationships
Talent: realism, empathy, lack of pretence
The Regular Person is also known as: The good old boy, everyman, the person next door, the realist, the working stiff, the solid citizen, the good neighbour, the silent majority.

SCORPIO -  The Ruler

Motto: Power isn’t everything, it’s the only thing.
Core desire: control
Goal: create a prosperous, successful family or community
Strategy: exercise power
Greatest fear: chaos, being overthrown
Weakness: being authoritarian, unable to delegate
Talent: responsibility, leadership
The Ruler is also known as: The boss, leader, aristocrat, king, queen, politician, role model, manager or administrator.

SAGITTARIUS -  The Explorer

Motto: Don’t fence me in
Core desire: the freedom to find out who you are through exploring the world
Goal: to experience a better, more authentic, more fulfilling life
Biggest fear: getting trapped, conformity, and inner emptiness
Strategy: journey, seeking out and experiencing new things, escape from boredom
Weakness: aimless wandering, becoming a misfit
Talent: autonomy, ambition, being true to one’s soul
The explorer is also known as: The seeker, iconoclast, wanderer, individualist, pilgrim.

CAPRICORN -  The Sage

Motto: The truth will set you free
Core desire: to find the truth.
Goal: to use intelligence and analysis to understand the world.
Biggest fear: being duped, misled—or ignorance.
Strategy: seeking out information and knowledge; self-reflection and understanding thought processes.
Weakness: can study details forever and never act.
Talent: wisdom, intelligence.
The Sage is also known as: The expert, scholar, detective, advisor, thinker, philosopher, academic, researcher, thinker, planner, professional, mentor, teacher, contemplative.

AQUARIUS -  The Rebel

Motto: Rules are made to be broken
Core desire: revenge or revolution
Goal: to overturn what isn’t working
Greatest fear: to be powerless or ineffectual
Strategy: disrupt, destroy, or shock
Weakness: crossing over to the dark side, crime
Talent: outrageousness, radical freedom
The Outlaw is also known as: The rebel, revolutionary, wild man, the misfit, or iconoclast.

PISCES -  The Creator

Motto: If you can imagine it, it can be done
Core desire: to create things of enduring value
Goal: to realize a vision
Greatest fear: mediocre vision or execution
Strategy: develop artistic control and skill
Task: to create culture, express own vision
Weakness: perfectionism, bad solutions
Talent: creativity and imagination
The Creator is also known as: The artist, inventor, innovator, musician, writer or dreamer.

Lisa Lawrence’s Archetypes and Symbols List

Archetypes and Symbols

SITUATION ARCHETYPES

1. The Quest – This motif describes the search for someone or some talisman which, when found and brought back, will restore fertility to a wasted land, the desolation of which is mirrored by a leader’s illness and disability.

2. The Task – This refers to a possibly superhuman feat that must be accomplished in order to fulfill the ultimate goal.

3. The Journey – The journey sends the hero in search for some truth of information necessary to restore fertility, justice, and/or harmony to the kingdom. The journey includes the series of trials and tribulations the hero faces along the way. Usually the hero descends into a real or psychological hell and is forced to discover the blackest truths, quite often concerning his faults. Once the hero is at this lowest level, he must accept personal responsibility to return to the world of the living.

4. The Initiation – This situation refers to a moment, usually psychological, in which an individual comes into maturity. He or she gains a new awareness into the nature of circumstances and problems and understands his or her responsibility for trying to resolve the dilemma. Typically, a hero receives a calling, a message or signal that he or she must make sacrifices and become responsible for getting involved in the problem. Often a hero will deny and question the calling and ultimately, in the initiation, will accept responsibility.

5. The Ritual – Not to be confused with the initiation, the ritual refers to an organized ceremony that involves honored members of a given community and an Initiate. This situation officially brings the young man or woman into the realm of the community’s adult world.

6. The Fall – Not to be confused with the awareness in the initiation, this archetype describes a descent in action from a higher to a lower state of being, an experience which might involve defilement, moral imperfection, and/or loss of innocence. This fall is often accompanied by expulsion from a kind of paradise as penalty for disobedience and/or moral transgression.

7. Death and Rebirth – The most common of all situational archetypes, this motif grows out of the parallel between the cycle of nature and the cycle of life. It refers to those situations in which someone or something, concrete and/or metaphysical dies, yet is accompanied by some sign of birth or rebirth.

8. Nature vs. Mechanistic World – Expressed in its simplest form, this refers to situations which suggest that nature is good whereas the forces of technology are bad.

9. Battle Between Good and Evil – These situations pit obvious forces which represent good and evil against one another; typically, good ultimately triumphs over evil despite great odds.

10. The Unhealable Wound – This wound, physical or psychological, cannot be healed fully. This would also indicate a loss of innocence or purity. Often the wounds’ pain drives the sufferer to desperate measures of madness.

11. The Magic Weapon – Sometimes connected with the task, this refers to a skilled individual hero’s ability to use a piece of technology in order to combat evil, continue a journey, or to prove his or her identity as a chosen individual.

12. Father-Son Conflict – Tension often results from separation during childhood or from an external source when the individuals meet as men and where the mentor often has a higher place in the affections of the hero than the natural parent. Sometimes the conflict is resolved in atonement.

13. Innate Wisdom vs. Educated Stupidity – Some characters exhibit wisdom and understanding intuitively as opposed to those supposedly in charge.

SYMBOLIC ARCHETYPES

1. Light vs. Darkness – Light usually suggests hope, renewal, OR intellectual illumination; darkness implies the unknown, ignorance, or despair.

2. Water vs. Desert – Because water is necessary to life and growth, it commonly appears as a birth or rebirth symbol. Water is used in baptism services, which solemnizes spiritual births. Similarly, the appearance of rain in a work of literature can suggest a character’s spiritual birth.

3. Heaven vs. Hell – Humanity has traditionally associated parts of the universe not accessible to it with the dwelling places of the primordial forces that govern its world. The skies and mountaintops house its gods; the bowels of the earth contain the diabolic forces that inhabit its universe.

4. Haven vs. Wilderness – Places of safety contrast sharply against the dangerous wilderness. Heroes are often sheltered for a time to regain health and resources.

5. Supernatural Intervention – The gods intervene on the side of the hero or sometimes against him.

6. Fire vs. Ice – Fire represents knowledge, light, life, and rebirth while ice like desert represents ignorance, darkness, sterility, and death.

7. Colors

A. Black (darkness) – chaos, mystery, the unknown, before existence, death, the unconscious, evil

B. Red – blood, sacrifice; violent passion, disorder, sunrise, birth, fire, emotion, wounds, death, sentiment, mother, Mars, the note C, anger, excitement, heat, physical stimulation

C. Green – hope, growth, envy, Earth, fertility, sensation, vegetation, death, water, nature, sympathy, adaptability, growth, Jupiter and Venus, the note G, envy

D. White (light) – purity, peace, innocence, goodness, Spirit, morality, creative force, the direction East, spiritual thought

E. Orange – fire, pride, ambition, egoism, Venus, the note D

F. Blue – clear sky, the day, the sea, height, depth, heaven, religious feeling, devotion, innocence, truth, spirituality, Jupiter, the note F, physical soothing and cooling

G. Violet – water, nostalgia, memory, advanced spirituality, Neptune, the note B

H. Gold – Majesty, sun, wealth, corn (life dependency), truth

I. Silver – Moon, wealth

8. Numbers:

A. Three – the Trinity (Father, Son, Holy Ghost); Mind, Body, Spirit, Birth, Life, Death

B. Four – Mankind (four limbs), four elements, four seasons

C. Six – devil, evil

D. Seven – Divinity (3) + Mankind (4) = relationship between man and God, seven deadly sins, seven days of week, seven days to create the world, seven stages of civilization, seven colors of the rainbow, seven gifts of Holy Spirit.

9. Shapes:

A. Oval – woman, passivity

B. Triangle – communication, between heaven and earth, fire, the number 3, trinity, aspiration, movement upward, return to origins, sight, light

C. Square – pluralism, earth, firmness, stability, construction, material solidity, the number four

D. Rectangle – the most rational, most secure

E. Cross – the Tree of life, axis of the world, struggle, martyrdom, orientation in space

F. Circle – Heaven, intellect, thought, sun, the number two, unity, perfection, eternity, oneness, celestial realm, hearing, sound

G. Spiral – the evolution of the universe, orbit, growth, deepening, cosmic motion, relationship between unity and multiplicity, macrocosm, breath, spirit, water

10. Nature:

A. Air – activity, creativity, breath, light, freedom (liberty), movement

B. Ascent – height, transcendence, inward journey, increasing intensity

C. Center – thought, unity, timelessness, spacelessness, paradise, creator, infinity,

D. Descent – unconscious, potentialities of being, animal nature

E. Duality – Yin-Yang, opposites, complements, positive-negative, male-female, life-death

F. Earth – passive, feminine, receptive, solid

G. Fire – the ability to transform, love, life, health, control, sun, God, passion, spiritual energy, regeneration

H. Lake – mystery, depth, unconscious

I. Crescent moon – change, transition

J. Mountain – height, mass, loftiness, center of the world, ambition, goals

K. Valley – depression, low-points, evil, unknown

L. Sun – Hero, son of Heaven, knowledge, the Divine eye, fire, life force, creative-guiding force, brightness, splendor, active awakening, healing, resurrection, ultimate wholeness

M. Water – passive, feminine

N. Rivers/Streams – life force, life cycle

O. Stars – guidance

P. Wind – Holy Spirit, life, messenger

Q. Ice/Snow – coldness, barrenness

R. Clouds/Mist – mystery, sacred

S. Rain – life giver

T. Steam – transformation to the Holy Spirit

U. Cave – feminine

V. Lightning – intuition, inspiration

W. Tree – where we learn, tree of life, tree of knowledge

X. Forest – evil, lost, fear

11. Objects:

A. Feathers – lightness, speed

B. Shadow – our dark side, evil, devil

C. Masks – concealment

D. Boats/Rafts – safe passage

E. Bridge – change, transformation

F. Right hand – rectitude, correctness

G. Left hand – deviousness

H. Feet – stability, freedom

I. Skeleton – mortality

J. Heart – love, emotions

K. Hourglass – the passage of time

CHARACTER ARCHETYPES

1. The Hero – In its simplest form, this character is the one ultimately who may fulfill a necessary task and who will restore fertility, harmony, and/or justice to a community. The hero character is the one who typically experiences an initiation, who goes the community’s ritual (s), et cetera. Often he or she will embody characteristics of YOUNG PERSON FROM THE PROVINCES, INITIATE, INNATE WISDOM, PUPIL, and SON.

2. Young Person from the Provinces – This hero is taken away as an infant or youth and raised by strangers. He or she later returns home as a stranger and able to recognize new problems and new solutions.

3. The Initiates – These are young heroes who, prior to the quest, must endure some training and ritual. They are usually innocent at this stage.

4. Mentors – These individuals serve as teachers or counselors to the initiates. Sometimes they work as role models and often serve as father or mother figure. They teach by example the skills necessary to survive the journey and quest.

5. Hunting Group of Companions – These loyal companions are willing to face any number of perils in order to be together.

6. Loyal Retainers – These individuals are like the noble sidekicks to the hero. Their duty is to protect the hero. Often the retainer reflects the hero’s nobility.

7. Friendly Beast –These animals assist the hero and reflect that nature is on the hero’s side.

8. The Devil Figure – This character represents evil incarnate. He or she may offer worldly goods, fame, or knowledge to the protagonist in exchange for possession of the soul or integrity. This figure’s main aim is to oppose the hero in his or her quest.

9. The Evil Figure with the Ultimately Good Heart – This redeemable devil figure (or servant to the devil figure) is saved by the hero’s nobility or good heart.

10. The Scapegoat – An animal or more usually a human whose death, often in a public ceremony, excuses some taint or sin that has been visited upon the community. This death often makes theme more powerful force to the hero.

11. The Outcast – This figure is banished from a community for some crime (real or imagined). The outcast is usually destined to become a wanderer.

12. The Earth Mother – This character is symbolic of fulfillment, abundance, and fertility; offers spiritual and emotional nourishment to those who she contacts; often depicted in earth colors, with large breasts and hips.

13. The Temptress – Characterized by sensuous beauty, she is one whose physical attraction may bring about the hero’s downfall.

14. The Platonic Ideal – This source of inspiration often is a physical and spiritual ideal for whom the hero has an intellectual rather than physical attraction.

15. The Unfaithful Wife – This woman, married to a man she sees as dull or distant, is attracted to a more virile or interesting man.

16. The Damsel in Distress – This vulnerable woman must be rescued by the hero. She also may be used as a trap, by an evil figure, to ensnare the hero.

17. The Star-Crossed Lovers – These two characters are engaged in a love affair that is fated to end in tragedy for one or both due to the disapproval of society, friends, family, or the gods.

18. The Creature of Nightmare – This monster, physical or abstract, is summoned from the deepest, darkest parts of the human psyche to threaten the lives of the hero/heroine. Often it is a perversion or desecration of the human body.

RECOGNIZING PATTERNS

The following list of patterns comes from the book How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster who teaches at the University of Michigan. If you are serious about literary analysis, then it is highly recommended that you buy this book. It goes into detail what is just briefly mentioned and is written in such a lively, witty voice that it does not read like a textbook at all! It will be well worth your time and effort to read it.

Ø  Trips tend to become quests to discover self.

Ø  Meals together tend to be acts of communion/community or isolation.

Ø  Ghosts, vampires, monsters, and nasty people and sometimes simply the antagonists are not about supernatural brew-ha-ha; they tend to depict some sort of exploitation.

Ø  There’s only one story. Look for allusions and archetypes.

Ø  Weather matters.

Ø  Violence and be both literal and figurative.

Ø  Symbols can be objects, images, events, and actions.

Ø  Sometimes a story is meant to change us, the readers, and through us change society.

Ø  Keep an eye out for Christ-figures.

Ø  Flying tends to represent freedom. What do you think falling represents?

Ø  Getting dunked or just sprinkled in something wet tends to be a baptism.

Ø  Geography tends to be a metaphor for the psyche.

Ø  Seasons tend to be traditional symbols.

Ø  Disabilities, Scars, and Deformities show character and theme.

Ø  Heart disease tends to represent problems with character and society.

Ø  So do illness and disease.

Ø  Read with your imagination.

Ø  Irony trumps everything!

Ø  Remember the difference between public and private symbols.

MLA Citation (7th Edition)

Lawrence, Lisa. “Archetypes and Symbols.” West Morris Central High School. West Morris Regional High School District, n.d. Web. 23 Jan. 2013. <http://central.wmrhsd.org/FACULTY…/Archetypesandsymbols.pdf>.

Western Mythic/Literary Archetypes Associated with the Signs

Aries—Ares, Athena, Adam, Lilith, Samson, Lancelot, Xena

Taurus—Narcissus, Adonis, Io, Edenic Eve, Snow White, The Evil Queen, Isis, Theseus, Edenic Adam

Gemini—Hermes, Castor & Pollux, Cain & Abel, Puck, Eris, Juliet, Peter Pan, Robin Hood, Enlightened Eve, Tinkerbell

Cancer—Greek Noah, Themis, Osiris, Selene, Heracles, Biblical Noah, Pinocchio, Cinderella, Derceto, The Fairy Godmother

Leo—Helios, Ra, Artemis, Hestia, Solomon, David, Morgain, Bathsheba, St. Genevieve, Tom Sawyer, Arthur Pendragon, Dorothy

Virgo—Prometheus, Hephaestus, Hermes, Demeter, Pandora, Cain, Mary Magdalene, Wendy

Libra—Apollo, Aphrodite, The Fates/Muses/Furies, Lucifer, Medea, Circe, Astraea, Ishtar

Scorpio—Hades, Satan, Persephone, The Sphinx, The Beast, Alice

Sagittarius—Zeus, Dionysus, Hera, Lady Godiva, Huckleberry Finn, Jane Eyre

Capricorn—Cronus, Pan, Rhea, Azazel, Moses, Titania, Mother Goose

Aquarius—Uranus, Ganymede, Hebe, Eos, John the Baptist, Merlin, Salome, St. Ambrose

Pisces—Eros, Aphrodite, Poseidon, Amphitrite, Jesus Christ, Mary, The Muses, Ondine, Uncle Tom

medium.com
Recycling Archetypes, Fairytales, and Master Plots: where all your Hollywood movies come from
It’s a cruel irony, Aaron Sorkin cannibalised his view on artistic “recycling” from T.S Eliot’s brutal reflection of creative realpolitick:
By AC

This is a great (slightly long) read that summarizes all of those basic story archetypes you hear about so much (and some that you’ve don’t). Examples of what it covers: 

Aristotle’s “Poetics”

  • Mimesis: forming a picture in the viewer’s mind 
  • Mythos: the plot, or message structure of the work.
  • Opsis: the physical and visual presentation of the drama.
  • Desis: the “tying” together of story elements that result in the end.
  • Anagnorisis: a discovery, or incident that sparks the story events.
  • Lusis: the “untying” of the story’s “mess” into a climax.
  • Katharsis: the audience’s emotional “purging” from experiencing the story.

The Three Appeals

  • Ethos: the credibility of a subject or author.
  • Pathos: the emotion (e.g. pity) of a subject.
  • Logos: the logical reasoning of a subject.

The 16 Master Archetypes

  • Osiris Saviour (good side) vs. Punisher (bad side)
  • Poseidon Artist (good side) vs. Abuser (bad side)
  • Zeus King (good side) vs. Dictator (bad side)
  • Hera Matriarch (good side) vs. Scorned Woman (bad side)
  • Isis Saviour (good side) vs. Destroyer (bad side)
  • Perisphere Innocent maiden (good side) vs. Troubled teen (bad side)

The Unspecified Abstract 7 Plots

  • [wo]man vs. Nature
  • [wo]man vs. [wo]man
  • [wo]man vs. the Environment

The 7 Basic Plots — Christopher Booker

Overcoming the Monster: The protagonist sets out to defeat an antagonistic force (often evil) which threatens the protagonist and/or protagonist’s homeland.

Rags to Riches: The poor protagonist acquires things such as power, wealth, and a mate, before losing it all and gaining it back upon growing as a person.

Tragedy: The protagonist is a villain who falls from grace and whose death is a happy ending.

The 20 Master Plots — Ronald Tobias

Quest: The hero searches for something, someone, or somewhere. In reality, they may be searching for themselves, with the outer journey mirrored internally. They may be joined by a companion, who takes care of minor detail and whose limitations contrast with the hero’s greater qualities.

Adventure: The protagonist goes on an adventure, much like a quest, but with less of a focus on the end goal or the personal development of hero hero. In the adventure, there is more action for action’s sake.

Pursuit: the focus is on chase, with one person chasing another (and perhaps with multiple and alternating chase). The pursued person may be often cornered and somehow escape, so that the pursuit can continue. Depending on the story, the pursued person may be caught or may escape.

The 36 Dramatic Situations — Carlo Gozzi/Georges Polti

  • Deliverance
  • Crime pursued by vengeance
  • Vengeance taken for kindred upon kindred
  • Mistaken jealousy
  • Conflict with a god
  • Rivalry of superior and inferior

anonymous asked:

humanitarian is literally the (developed) aquarian ARCHETYPE, like, do you not get that you can't change that? it's literally set into stone, your personal experiences should never come into play with actual facts.

I’m not trying to change any ‘facts?’ (seriously what is it with people bringing ‘facts’ into astrology- this isn’t a hard science it’s nebulous and subjective and full of holes and exceptions and evolves with humanity, that’s the whole appeal)

 I’m not challenging the archetype? I’m just pointing out how it manifests in real human beings, and the fact is, so-called humanitarians (the human embodiment of the Aquarius archetype) are very often selfish, deceptive, and have hidden agendas (gandhi, obama, it’s a long list, use google)

astrology is useless unless you find a way to apply archetypes to real people and see how it plays out in the real world via… get this… personal experiences (wow)

also…. bruh….. nothing is set in stone… everything you take as a “fact” can change in a second (look at what happened to the world of physics w/quantum theory, scientists literally can’t agree on what reality is anymore, and that’s physics, not astrology which is even more weird and wishy-washy)

astrology is a human construct, along with every archetype in it.

a chair is only a chair because you decide it’s a chair and sit on it, without your ‘perception’ and ‘personal experience’ it’s just dead wood glued together in a weird shape

personal experience is a perfectly valid way to come up with new ideas and draw your own conclusions about stuff, that is literally why we are alive and have functional brains

‘facts’ aren’t created in a vaccum; they are verbalized by people applying their personal experience/perception to the world

** I sound mad but I’m not mad, just trying to clear some really basic things up, feel like this should all be common sense so idk

Modern Day American Gothic: Teenage Girls

Teenage girls who chew too much bubble gum and somehow know everything about everything. Girls who ditch class to grab a smoke and escape from wobbly desks and fluorescent lights. Sharing secrets and memories, scheming, and laughing laughs that sound more witch than girl. They walk their neighbourhoods, bringing malice and evil with them as they smile through bright pink lips and lollipop stained tongues. On stormy days, when the gray sky sags with rain and the earth no longer smells of sunny suburban afternoons, they swing on old playgrounds, letting their short skirts whip around their goose-bumped thighs as teenage boys gape. They are girls who know exactly what they are and what they are capable of as they prowl for victims in moon lit skies and neon lights.

Archetypes

Aries: The Warrior, The Pioneer, The Daredevil, The Survivor.

Taurus: The Earth Spirit, The Musician, The Silent One.

Gemini: The Witness, The Teacher, The Storyteller, The Journalist.

Cancer: The Mother, The Healer, The Invisible Man.

Leo: The King(Queen), The Performer, The Clown, The Child

Virgo: The Servant, The Martyr, The Perfectionist, The Analyst.

LIbra: The Lover, The Artist, The Peacemaker.

Scorpio: The Detective, The Sorcerer, The Hypnotist.

Sagittarius: The Traveler, The Student, The Philosopher.

Capricorn: The Hermit, The Father, The Prime Minister.

Aquarius: The Genius, The Revolutionary, The Truth Sayer, The Exile, The Scientist

Pisces: The Mystic, The Dreamer, The Poet.