guy power

Just a friendly reminder:



  • Steve Universe is a children’s animation that has themes of mourning, identity, romance both straight and lbgt, representation, a predominately female group in a scifi/fantasy setting
  • Gravity Falls is an enthralling mystery with suspense, horror, strained relationships within a family, having a positive outlook on an uncertain future. Also a children’s animation
  • Avatar the Last Airbender is an Asianic inspired adventure where an eclectic group of protagonists, powered and non, all under the age of 15 are responsible for ending a 100 year war. Is nonspecific oriented in terms of age demographic
  • The Amazing World of Gumball uses an eclectic array of animation/art styles, has genuine humor and toys with trope expectations, but also deals several heart warming moments. Definitely intended for children, but has a few more adult jokes. 
  • Clarence is a light hearted look into the almost idealistic world of childhood memory and experiences. Once again a Children’s animation. 
  • Regular Show is, while intended for children, a stoner comedy with themes of growing up and dealing with relationships romantic or non, particularly moving on. 
  • Adventure Time, despite in my personal opinion straining under its own weight in recent years, delves into aspects of depression, nurodiversity, responsibility, themes of growing up,  accepting mortality, morality is a grey area being a reoccurring theme. Also a children’s animation. 
  • Star VS the Forces of Evil, a children’s animation with a female protagonist and a Hispanic male lead, is a subversion of the magical girl genre in anime with unique style and humor, deals with the aftereffects of colonialism(both from the oppressed and the descendants of oppressors)
  • Bojack Horseman, an adult animation, delves into the psychosis of an alcoholic struggling with depression and self loathing, toxic relationships, the effects of having and loosing fame, has an asexual supporting character, and heavily deals with the consequences of our actions for better or for worse. 
  • The Adventures of Rick and Morty, another adult animation, deals with existentialism, depression, surviving an attempted sexual assault, sacrificing your freedom for your family, and much, much dark humor. 




Meanwhile Seth Macfarlene is still swimming in the stagnate pile of decaying fecal matter and vomit that is his three series, Family Guy being the worst offender. Littered with horrible messages, shock humor that tries far too hard and is pathetic to watch, and completely insulting to everyone. Hell, even the Simpsons are still fresh and interesting after a decade on the air. And the remakes of Teen Titans and Power Puff Girls are an insult to the original series, and are peddled off as for children. 

6

hey so uhhhh i’m super late but i made a bnha ‘’oc’’

5

While rummaging through a box he found in the attic, England uncovers some old photos, along with old memories.

(These took so long to make, I hope you guys like them! I was trying to put subtle stuff in the photos to try and tell a story, I’ve never done it before so it was good practice! I might end up writing something for this if I decide to stop being lazy.)

3

GO EKUBO!!!

  • you: why are you crying
  • me: sam vimes went from a man who looked the other way and drank to forget all the injustice in the world to a man who's such a powerful force for justice that he can stop wars before they start and still make it home in time to read his son a bedtime story

Druid Shiro Theory Part 2: Shiro’s Arm

Following on from this post about how Shiro is probably a part-Altean Druid who can do magic and make wormholes, let’s talk about Shiro’s arm for a sec. Specifically: why did Haggar give him the arm, and what is it intended to do?

First up… let’s talk about Haggar. She was the one who gave Shiro his Galra arm. We know she loves combining magic and technology, as evidenced by all the robeasts. Perhaps the most dramatic example is the Komar Experiment:

It’s got that weird black smoke surrounded by the purple glow (obviously magic) and the purple lines running across the metal supports (the technology element). Here’s another, wider view of the whole rig:

And now here’s Shiro’s arm, the first time it activates:

Pretty similar, right? And a moment later, he gets that black smoke and purple glow around the hand, right before he overpowers it and then hacks up a bunch of Galra sentries.

{TBH I just wanted an excuse to include this screenshot}

Of course, the revelation that Shiro’s arm is Galra magi-tech is a surprise to precisely no one at this point, but here’s the thing: the Komar Experiment was powered by a bunch of druids. The black smoke and purple glow all came from them. What’s powering Shiro’s arm?

Now, imagine for a minute that you’re Haggar. You find out one of your captive test subjects is part-Altean and has the dormant ability to do magic. You want to turn him into a powerful magical weapon: a Druid completely under your control, trained to fight and do magic. Do you (a) sit in his cell and spend hours walking him through Sorcery 101 until he learns to control his powers, or (b) fit him with some kind of device - say, a prosthetic arm - that activates his magic for him, against his will if necessary.

Option (b) is really more Haggar’s style, right? And the Komar Experiment is proof that Haggar has zero chill and will happily rip the quintessence out of an entire planet if she wants to, because she’s the real Chaotic Evil of this show.

Now let’s take a look at this picture. This is Shiro’s hand right before he brings the arm under his control:

This looks like Shiro is about to do some druid magic. He looks like he’s about to fling some purple lightening or some of that weird black smoke - but he doesn’t. Instead, he overpowers the arm, brings it under his control, and uses it as a weapon.

So here’s an idea: what if Shiro’s arm is a mechanism that forcibly activates his Druid abilities? It would be powered by his own magic, if that were the case. And the reason why it looks like Shiro’s about to do druid magic is because… well… he is. But it’s being forced out of him, and it’s painful and harmful (like forcing the crystals out of the Balmera is painful and harmful). And now that Shiro is free of Haggar’s influence and control, he reins it in and reduces the magic to a level that doesn’t physically hurt him.

What if every time Shiro activates his Galra arm, he’s actually doing magic?

I mean… that arm LOOKS pretty magical. It has multiple functions that Shiro can apparently activate at will, and it gets that cool purple glow every time he uses it, and it leaves a trail of purple light when he wields it as a weapon.

Does that purple glow remind you of anything?

That’s Allura, right before she throws a bunch of magic back at Haggar and the Druids.

Shiro obviously isn’t consciously doing magic - but I think he might be subconsciously doing it. Just enough to make the arm do whatever he needs it to do. After he uses the arm in the Pilot, Pidge asks him: “Where did you learn to fight with that?” and Shiro says: “No idea.” He clearly knows how to use the arm, and we see him use it multiple times, but he doesn’t remember learning how to use it. His {procedural memory} is intact, but his {episodic memory} is damaged. He’s just working on instinct, intuitively channelling quintessence into the arm to power it up and make it work for him.

We’ve seen Shiro’s Galra arm do multiple cool things throughout the series, and whenever we see it, we just assume it’s the arm that’s doing it. But what if it’s not? What if it’s Shiro? The arm is just a tool - like a magic wand - that helps him activate his Druid powers, but all the functions we see are actually Shiro doing a bunch of low-level magic without fully realising what he’s doing or how he’s doing it. We’ve been crediting the arm, when we should have been crediting Shiro and his ability to manipulate quintessence.

Shiro is a Druid, and he’s been doing magic right in front of us this whole time.

so for the longest time I’ve enjoyed the way ngozi has given smh significant numbers for their jerseys. like how we all love that holster and ransom are 4-11 respectively because they quite literally give us the 411 on hockey shit in bitty’s first year.

but I only JUST noticed that shitty’s number is 42, which for all you non hitchiker fans out there, is the answer to the question “what is the meaning of life?”

this could either refer to the fact that shitty is a little existential (though he’s no johnson), and likes to answer questions about the world in a way smh giggles through with good-hearted amusement. or it could refer to the fact that shitty is one of jack’s few real friends, and certainly one of his first ones at samwell. he was responsible for getting jack a little more out of his shell, aggressively befriending him and making his life worthwhile again. so alternatively, the meaning of life is shitty - is friendship.

Don’t be afraid of love, take all chances that you have and when you lose them make a new ones. 

Tell the person that you love, well, that you love them. Fuck comunity, fuck oppinios, worst that can happens to you is to be rejected.

Whatever happens, just breathe.