gunnumber

Gun Number: 1

“How many people do you know who have been shot?” That’s the question Joe Heim asked people around the Washington region for an article that ran in The Washington Post Magazine.

We asked readers to write in and share how many people they knew who had been shot. Here are some of their responses.

GUN NUMBER: 1
James Worthey, 68
Gaithersburg

I saved the clippings from the Washington Post. June 26, 1992, page C5; and June 27, 1992, page B7. The man was Steven Hong-Luk King, age 51. My son and I knew him as the owner of a restaurant in Germantown. On weekends, his charming son, then about 4 or 5, would spend time at the restaurant to be with his father. Steven King was especially friendly to me and my son, who was 17. The little boy’s mother was Steven’s second wife.

He also had a son slightly older than my boy, but the older son was evidently a no-account. In June 1992, the 19-year old son and an accomplice undertook to rob Steven King at gunpoint. They shot and killed him for about $1,000 in cash.

After the shooting, I spent one pleasant afternoon with the widow and the little boy, and got to know other relatives of the deceased. I learned not to take friends or acquaintances for granted.

For me, the idea of gun violence became more real.

Gun Number: 7

“How many people do you know who have been shot?” That’s the question Joe Heim asked people around the Washington region for an article that ran in The Washington Post Magazine.

We asked readers to write in and share how many people they knew who had been shot. Here are some of their responses.

GUN NUMBER: 7
Heather Moreno, 39 
Arlington

My brother Christopher Morrison was killed coming home from his birthday party. He and his friend had just arrived home and they were laughing and joking about the night’s events when four men entered the house in search of money that did not exist.  After becoming angry that there wasn’t any money, one of the men shot my brother five times at point-blank range in the face and chest.  That same man and another man both shot his friend.

Someone had told those men he had lots of money because he bought himself a new car for his birthday.  It was his first new car.

You hear about people being killed every day on the news or through your friends and acquaintances, but you can never understand that shock that comes with the sudden and tragic death of a loved one. It’s feels like you’ve stepped in front of a moving train that you never saw coming.

I can’t stop crying. I’m always on high alert, looking around for people who may want to do me harm. I’m always checking the rear view mirror to see if I’m being followed.  No matter what I do, I can’t get the hole in my heart to heal. I can’t stop replaying that day over in my head when we got the phone call that my brother had been murdered.

The only comfort that I have was the last words that I said to my brother were, “Have a happy birthday and I love you very much!”

Gun Number: 2

“How many people do you know who have been shot?” That’s the question Joe Heim asked people around the Washington region for an article that ran in The Washington Post Magazine.

We asked readers to write in and share how many people they knew who had been shot. Here are some of their responses.

GUN NUMBER: 2
Gabrielle Cabreros, 28
Virginia Beach

My first cousin died of an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound when deer hunting at age 26. My second cousin, who was at the time only 1 year old, accidentally shot herself when a loaded gun was left unattended. Her lung collapsed. She miraculously recovered and is now a beautiful 3-year-old.

My cousin’s parents never recovered from his death, and our family still misses him every day.  No one in our family, to my knowledge, hunts anymore.

Even though my baby cousin recovered and is healthy and wonderful, her incident also scared me enough to worry about having guns in a home with children.  She has loving and attentive parents who would never intentionally hurt her, and yet this life-threatening incident occurred.

Personally, I have always feared guns and wanted nothing to do with them, until I met my husband, who is ex-military and experienced with firearms. He taught me how to properly shoot a gun, but I still worry about having guns in our home. Our guns remain locked in a safe, and I will never let my children in a home where they’re not locked up.