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Draco RPK

A very strange hybrid that started off as a Romanian Draco AK pistol which was then converted into a psuedo-RPK. A rear trunnion was installed allowing for the use of a stock again but the barrel length still remains as a pistol. Definitely a one-of-a-kind that would be a fireball spitter at the range. Since it now has a stock, the pistol is reclassified as a Short Barreled Rifle. (GRH)

AKS-74U

The much shorter variant of the AKS-74, the 74U is one of the more popular AK builds but requires NFA paperwork since it is a Short Barreled Rifle. There is much debate as to where it’s nickname, the Krinkov, originated. One of the first theories was that the Mujahadeen had captured a Soviet officer with the name Krinkov who was carrying the 74U and the name became synonymous with the gun. This was later debunked when there were no documents or reports of a Soviet officer with that name being captured. (GRH)

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50 McMillan FatMac

Custom cartridge made by using a .50 caliber bullet head in a shortened bottlenecked 20mm cannon casing. It is capable of launching a 750 grain projectile at 3,400 FPS with the use of about 330 grains of powder. The FatMac is considered a “barrel burner”,  with the average barrel life of a firearm chambered in 50 FatMac to be about 100 rounds before the barrel needs to be replaced. (GRH)

Hera Arms CQR Foregrip

Just got this in the mail today and I figured I’d do a quick write up with my initial thoughts on what some consider to be either one of the coolest or ugliest foregrips on the market.

Most people know about the Hera Arms CQR stock and foregrip. I didn’t order the stock yet mostly cause all of the non-California compliant versions are sold out. Anyway here’s the package and what’s inside.

It came with no paperwork or an Allen Wrench for the screws. Luckily I have hundreds of those in my tool box and found one that fit.

It’s smaller than I thought it would be but it’s also light, I don’t have a scale to measure how much it weighs. It has “Made in Germany” markings, a QD mount on either side for your slings, and a textured area where your fingers would wrap around. It seems to be removable because there are 2 screws holding it in place, so maybe different sizes, colors or textures will be available down the line. The texture itself is not very abrasive or harsh, which can be a good or bad thing depending on your preferences. 

That just leaves installing it onto a gun. Most images of the CRQ Foregrip are on an SBR (Short Barreled Rifle), where I think it looks the best.

I’ve seen some photos on Google and reddit with the CQR on an AUG and an AR-15 with a 16″ barrel. It didn’t look that good from the pics on full size rifles so I didn’t bother putting onto my AR-15 or AR-10 (yet).

Instead I installed the CQR onto my shotgun, the Origin 12. Given the futuristic looks of the Origin 12, the CQR doesn’t seem out of place as it would on a standard AR-15 with a quad rail. I’ve been trying to find a vertical or foregrip for this shotgun for a while, but none of them matched or felt right. With the CQR it feels a lot more balanced than when I used a standard Magpul vertical grip or AFG.

The CQR fits nice and snug on rails, with zero movement or play. It doesn’t interfere with magazine loading, in fact it kind of helps guide them in. So here’s pics of my Origin 12 with the CQR. It would probably look a lot better if I had the short-barrel assembly but I don’t.

Is the Hera Arms CQR worth it? In my case yes because it feels and looks great on my shotgun, however I can’t say you’ll have the same positive reaction or results with your AR-15. This is one of those parts you’ll love or hate, but because it looks so different, you may be underwhelmed or disappointed when it turns more into an aesthetic eyesore.

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FN Model 1949

Simply referred to as the FN49 or sometimes SAFN, this rifle is often viewed as the father of the FN FAL. The most common variant is the Egyptian model chambered in 8mm Mauser. Note the brass butt plate and unit coin. These are desirable features but not all Egyptians have them. In spite the box magazine the FN49 is stripper clip fed. The magazine is only removed for cleaning or replacing parts when needed. (GRH)

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Colt Python

Custom refinished “snake” gun from Colt’s popular but discontinued lineup of revolvers named after different snakes. Technically the Cobra was brought back in 2017 at SHOT Show but was a snub nosed .38 Special. The Python a .357 Magnum chambered revolver that can easily command anywhere from $2,000 to $10,000 depending on the configuration. (GRH)

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My New Henry Big Boy in .357 mag/.38 Special

About a month and a half ago I used my tax refund to buy this beautiful new lever action rifle. The Henry Big Boy is a lever action produced by Henry Repeating Arms Co., one of their many lever action products. Mine is chambered in .357 magnum, many of their rifles are chambered in pistol caliber cartridges, hearkening back to the days of the Old West when Winchester lever actions were chambered in cowboy pistol cartridges such as .44-40 and .45 Colt. The Henry Big Boy comes in .357, .44 mag, and .45 colt. Since mine is .357, it can also feed and chamber .38 special as well.  I bought this possibly as a short range hunting rifle, something to use when I don’t feel like using my flintlock.  Plus, since it can fire .38 special, it is a very economical plinking gun.  .357 is a fairly powerful pistol cartridge, but from a rifle it sports some very impressive ballistics, and it’s certainly good enough to take medium sized game at short ranges.

The most notable feature of the Big Boy is its brass frame. They also offer the same model with an iron frame, a checkered stock, and rubber butt pad. I considered buying that one because it would probably be more practical as a rifle to lug through thick woods. However the lovely gleam of it’s brass frame, brass butt plate, and brass barrel bands was too much to resist.  It will probably get scratched, oh well, it was worth it. The rifle features a neat hexagon barrel, adding to its nostalgic old timey look and giving you the feeling that you are handling an old fashioned cowboy gun. It features a ten round fixed magazine, which is loaded through a loading port at the end of the barrel.  To load the magazine port must be twisted and magazine rod removed. Then you insert the cartridges one at a time, then re-insert the magazine rod.

When I first bought this rifle the magazine rod was very hard to twist and operate.  However the more and more I work it, the more its wearing in and its becoming progressively easier.

Often the Henry Golden Boy and Big Boy is mistaken as a replica of the American Civil War era Henry M1860 lever action rifle. However this is not true. Rather, the Big Boy is almost like a hybrid of a Henry rifle, a Winchester Model 1866, and a Marlin Model 336.  It has the loading port system and tube magazine of the Henry, the forearm and brass frame of a Winchester M1866, and a Marlin action.  Regardless you still get this feeling of handling and firing an antique cowboy lever gun, a must for my tastes. The sights are simple, featuring and adjustable ramp rear sight and a front post sight.

Another feature I must mention is a transfer bar, which means you can have the hammer uncocked and down on a round without risk of accidental discharge, which is probably the most important modern feature on a rifle with design elements dating to the 19th century.

With .357 the action is very smooth and operates without any problem.  I did some plinking with both .357 and .38 special.  I purchased some cheap bottom shelf ammo not thinking about the possibility of feeding issues. Problem is I bought this really cheap .38 special ammo that used lacquered steel casings, and ejection was certainly is issue. I later bought some better quality .38 special with brass casings and found they fed with far less issues, though the action isn’t as smooth as with .357 and you kind of have to work the lever harder and faster to ensure proper feeding and ejection. The recoil is very light, even firing .357 magnum. Recoil wise I would compare it to 7.62x39.  So it will definitely save your shoulder despite the brass buttplate.

At first I just did some simple close range plinking at steel swivel targets at 25 yards.  The rifle hits right on at that range and it certainly is a fun plinker.  Then I took it to the 100 yard range to see what I can do. I must admit I had a bit of a handicap shooting, I work night shift and it was a particularly bright day. So my eyes were very sensitive to light and my vision a bit blurry. I think I’m turning into a vampire. 

I was shooting from a bench rest with open sights, using Fiocchi .357 magnum ammo with 142 grain bullets.  I was firing three rounds groups.  First I tested it at 50 yards. At 50 yards the target and visible and well defined. Note that each increment on the grid is one inch.

The first group shot to the right and high aiming at the bull. I decided to play with the adjustable ramp sight, lowering it one increment.  The result was the 2nd group, which shot low.  Thus I reset the sight and adjusted but aiming low, and to the left, resulting in the third group. At 50 yards it shoots on average 1-2 inch groupings.

I then continued by shooting at 100 yards.  At 100 yards the front sight completely covers the bullseye and black portion of the target.

Despite increasing range to 100 yards it still shot high, in fact it shot much higher than at 50 yards. The first grouping I was aiming right for the bull, resulting again in a high group, with one shot completely off the target. I can only assume know that the .357 magnum’s ballistic arc from this rifle is much more considerable than I had previously imagined.  Thus I adjust the the ramp sight down one increment. Like at 50 yards it then shot too low (2nd group). So I reset the sight and decided to aim low, resulting in the third group. At 100 yards it shoots around 2-3 inch groupings on average.

In my final test, I went back to 50 yards. This time I was not using the bench rest, instead firing off hand.  Nor was I taking time with my shots.  Basically the scenario was that I am the sheriff of a western town and some outlaws are up to no good and I have to deal with them.  So I was shooting as quickly as possible while keeping rounds on target.  This was the result.

Now I must say this is no tack driver, nor is it a long range rifle, and I bought it with that expectation. Ballistics data using a 140 grain bullet show that it has a drop of -.2 inches at 100 yards and -5 inches at 150 yards.  So 100 yards is probably the edge of its optimum range. Mine seems to shoot high, but I still would not go beyond 100 yards.  That is fine to me since where I traditionally hunt it is thick woods and there is rarely any continuous ground more than 75 yards. With a scope you could probably get much better range and accuracy out of it. I imagine that if I was using much better quality ammunition with hotter loads, say +P or buffalo bore ammunition, the groupings would tighten considerably at 100 yards and the adjustable sites will be much more useful.  I shall try that some time in the future and post the results.

My final comments on the Henry Big Boy had to do with its quality. Originally I wanted to buy a Rossi Circuit Judge in .410/.45 long colt, most because of the allure of a revolving rifle.  However, I had seen many complaints about the quality of it and manufacturing flaws. Plus it carried the Taurus name (Rossi is owned by Taurus), a Brazilian company which has a reputation for iffy quality control.  So I decided to ditch the Circuit Judge. I also looked at the Ross M1892 lever action rifle, also in .357/38 and also made by Taurus.  It was $300 cheaper (the Henry cost $730), but when I saw it in person I was not impressed.  The metal work was OK, as was the metal finish, done satisfactorily but nothing thrilling.  However the wood and wood finish looked bad, as if it had been done by either child labor, a drunk, or someone who just didn’t really care about what they were doing.  It was really off putting.  The Henry looks like a rifle of unparalleled quality at first glance. It looks like someone made them with an eye for detail and with uncompromising quality in mind. I also own a Henry lever action in .22LR as well, although with a steel frame, and I can say the same for it.  When the sales person took it out of the box I immediately blurted “holy shit, that’s a beautiful rifIe.” I can’t stress the quality of workmanship that goes into Henry rifles, they are more than just firearms, they are works of art.  They are the only metallic cartridge firearms I own and I have no plans nor feel the need to buy any other modern firearms again. Instead I want to focus my collection on antique muzzleloaders or replicas of antique muzzleloaders.  So for me the quality of the Henry trumps all else, its a rifle you can own for a lifetime and can be passed down from generation to generation.