gun jams

PROFILING GUN PEOPLE

A Reference Guide to Identify The Various Breeds of Gun People

CHAPTER ONE - HANDGUNS

-1911 People - 

>See .45 or Die! People<

“Because they don’t make a .46" 

"Back to back world war champs.”

“I’d never carry some cheap plastic gun.”

More likely to be older possibly obese.

Oddly enough, most likely to misuse the term “cocked and locked”

“Feel that trigger pull MMMMMMMM" 

"If you can’t do the job with 7 rounds you don’t need a gun.”

1911s can jam but THEIRS has NEVER ONCE failed in any way.

Most likely to use the term “Tack driver" 

"I fired a glock once, it literally jammed every shot then fell apart in my hands then raped my daughter.”

-Glock People -

Mac people of the gun world

“They just work.”

“Its not plastic its POLYMER!" 

Has a lot of passionate opinions about the arguably minor changes from one generation to another

"They never break." 

"Muh capacity" 

"Workhorse of the gun world”

“The arc is NOT ridiculously exaggerated just re-train yourself to automatically correct down it’s not that hard!”

“Its beautiful because it works”

“Well it fits MY hand just fine”

“Its not blocky!" 

"This is your safety!” >wiggles finger in your face like an asshole. 

- Kimber People -

Vegans of the gun world, will strut into any firearms conversation and proudly announce they own a Kimber Pro Raptor II and then wait silently expecting lowly peasants to applaud. 

Steers every conversation toward their Kimber

Fails to understand why not everyone can drop 1400 dollars on a handgun

Will get confused and personally offended if you don’t like Kimber

Self convinced that the outrageous price they paid is proof their gun is better. 

Most likely to be caught in a circle jerk with other Kimber owners.

- LC9/380/P  Owners -

Bought the first gun that the forum they found on google told them to. 

Wants to protect themselves but thinks guns are kind of scary, so they picked the most non-exciting gun with no sharp corners and like 12 safeties.

“Its all I need”

“My brother-in-law has one and he really liked his.." 

"Its for me and my wife to share”

“Why would I need a holster? Can’t I just put it in my purse?”

“Is the thing supposed to stay back like that?" 

"How do I get the clip out?" 

"I’d like to purchase this gun please… and a box of those really mean killing bullets for killing people in case I need to kill someone.”

- Hi Point Owners -

Most likely to have neck tattoos. 

“Ey yo, where like yo cheapest guns at?" 

"So how exactly does this ”background check" work?“

"EY BABEY come fill out this form for me!" 

"This bullshit I can’t believe I got denied!”

- Desert Eagle People -

Most likely to reference Call of Duty

“Can I see the Desert Eagle?”
>Are you 21?
“…no”

“Most stopping power of any gun!”

Did not realize Desert Eagles were this massive in real life.

Can not wait to tell the rest of his middle school friends about the real Desert Eagle he saw.

- Revolver People -

Expresses bizarre distrust for semi-automatic handguns despite overwhelming evidence otherwise. 

Most likely elderly

Most likely to pull his own loaded .38 from his pocket for comparison then become offended when you ask to unload it first. 

Thinks NAA minis are a reasonable carry gun, does not understand why anyone would disagree. 

Assures you he can nail a tin can from 500 yards away with his Single Six despite his obviously severe palsy shake.

Will go into detail about what he paid for every gun 60 years ago. 

- M9 / 92FS People -

“Its the gun the military uses!" 

Most likely to be incorrectly wearing mismatched army surplus clothing.

"What if you get jumped by 15 people?" 

Will tell you its the gun he carried in the service but strangely fail to recall what unit he was with. 

Most likely to be open carrying KaBar on his tan MCMAP belt. 

- FNH People - 

Most likely wearing oakleys and a slightly too tight under armor shirt.

Uses the word "Tactical” at every opportunity.

Everything must be Coyote Tan

Is conviced that Chris Costa video he saw most of makes makes him an operator. 

Most likely to spend most of his range time taking cool action shots for facebook. 

Has strong opinions about 5.11 pants. 

Minimum of one Paracord Bracelet 

Will regularly scan right to left, just like that video told him.

Will run imaginary pistol drills with every gun you let him see, to demonstrate to you that he must really  know what he’s doing.

- Sig Sauer People -

>See Kimber People<

“The de-cocker is NOT a useless feature!”

Muh Quality Control 

Muh Resale Value

Thinks the high price is completely reasonable. 

“I really only needed one mag anyway.”

Will justify a P220 but thinks 1911s are too heavy.

“Yes I really NEED the Scorpion finish. 

INB4 Butthurt fanboys

Simo Häyhä - “The White Death”

Häyhä’s count of 542 kills is an all-time record for a sniper in any conflict and was achieved in only 98 days of the ‘Winter War.

The Winter War erupted in 1939 with the Soviet invasion of Finland, and the mild-looking Simo was called into service.
Despite vastly outnumbering the Finns, the Soviet Army suffered massive casualties due to their inexperience, the freezing temperatures and of course, Simo Häyhä, all of 5'3"(1.6002m) tall.

For those 98 days, Häyhä conducted lone missions to the front lines, tormenting the Russians and picking off soldiers one by one, until he was shot and injured by an exploding bullet a few days prior to the war ending. The bullet had crushed his jaw and blown off part of his left cheek.

Häyhä, in many ways, had the perfect preparation for becoming a sniper. He grew up on a rural farm and loved to hunt.
His specialty were foxes, one of the more difficult animals to hunt, due to their small stature, speed and ability to hide. He would test himself with birds which would flee at even the slightest sound, reflection or sudden movement.
He felt no hatred for the enemy, instead, he only concentrated on ensuring his weapon was well supported and stable, and that his personal feelings and emotions would not impinge on his ability as a marksman. Häyhä did not mind spending hours upon hours on his own and would even go to his shooting ‘nests’ at night to ensure they were well hidden and strong.

Especially in the -20 temperatures of the Finnish winter, proper gun maintenance was essential to avoid it jamming. His gun was a Mosin-Nagant M/28-30, one that he had owned before the war, without even a telescopic sight.
Häyhä, when conducting his operations, took every detail into account. He would even pour water into the snow in front of him so that the muzzle blast would not expose his location by disturbing the light snow. (Excerpt by Author Taipo Saarelainen, The White Sniper: Simo Häyhä)

(Simo also kept snow in his mouth while sniping, in order to prevent steamy breaths from giving away his position in the cold air.)

Simo Häyhä passed away in 2002 at the age of 96.

(Photo source - Finnish Military Archives)

(Colorised by Paul Kerestes from Romania)

Sharp. [Bucky Barnes x Reader]

Summary: Hey! Could you do a Bucky X reader where the reader has wolverine powers? The reader is a new recruit and no one knows about her powers until she saves Bucky out on the field and when they come back she shuts down and won’t speak until Bucky kisses her? The rest is up to you P.S love your writing ❤️

Warnings: angst? don’t know.

a/n: DECLAN DON’T READ THIS OH MY GOD THIS IS SO EMBARRASSING.
I got way too stressed out over this fic and I don’t know why.


When Nick Fury personally escorted you into the tower, Bucky was the only one who was present. It was still one of his first few months there, and so the team were not authorized to not take him on missions as yet.

Quiet, reserved, non-approachable. All the adjectives that could describe him when he had first entered the Avengers Tower, and probably still could be described as. 

So when he noticed himself in your fidgeting fingers and downcast eyes, he took it upon himself to make sure you weren’t as astray as he was. He’d be your best friend and he’d do the same as Bruce had done for him- made him feel accepted.

He figured that maybe you both could be friends, that maybe you’ll learn the ways of the Avengers together. Maybe you’ll grow together in the tower, and make sure the other was safe. And so as he approached you with a kind smile and warm eyes, Nick was a little taken aback, but he soon realised that he knew what kind of a spirit Bucky was.

“Hi,” he said nervously.

As your eyes looked up at his, he was positive he felt his world cease. Because you had the most stunning eyes he had most probably ever seen.

Uhh-” He scurried to collect his thoughts before he made a fool of himself. “-umm.

And when you gave him a tiny wisp of a smile he felt like his heart would bolt out of his chest because damn it, if it wasn’t the most uplifting things he had seen in a while.

And that just laid the foundations of what cemented your friendship. The myriad of small things you both would do for each other, owing to the fact that to the both of you, the other undoubtedly one of the best people they knew. 

Sometimes you’d bring him his laundry and sometimes he’d pass you the remote to watch whatever you pleased when you sat down next to him on the couch. Sometimes you’d help him with making breakfast for the others and sometimes he’d buy your favourite kind of cookies without being asked to. Sometimes you’d just sit there in silence with him and sometimes he’d do nothing too, just occasionally look at you to find you staring ahead peacefully and that’d be enough for him.

After a few more months of strenuous training with the rest of the Avengers, it just occurred to him that he was still clueless as to why you were asked to join the team.

He knew of your healing properties, but he suspected that that wasn’t all. He’d ask Steve, but Steve would just reply with the tenuous shake of his head and a ‘You’ll see it later’. 

And so when the time did come, neither of you were braced for it. 

Keep reading

In-depth: the Lanchester & Sten

After the British Expeditionary Force’s retreat from Dunkirk in June 1940, Germany was expected to attempt a full-scale invasion of Britain. In order to accomplish this, they would need to eliminate the Royal Air Force, and as such, the RAF’s airfields were at serious risk. The RAF wanted a Schmeisser-type submachine gun issued to their personnel in the event of an attack from German paratroopers. The Navy had already ordered 2000 Smith & Wesson 9mm carbines and the Army, who by now had realized that they had vastly underestimated the military effectiveness of the submachine gun, began buying Thompsons from the United States.


The Biwarip machine carbine, an early precursor to the Sten made in 1938 and tested by the Small Arms Committee. Remarkably modern for its time.


The RAF initially examined captured MP-38s and ordered 10,000 British-made copies, but there were complications that resulted not only in the weapons being changed from copies of the MP-38 to the MP-28, but also the order being increased to 50,000 to satisfy the Navy as well, who had been forced to abandon the S&W carbines due to serious malfunctions. Sterling Armaments Co. was contracted to produce the initial prototypes of the MP-28 copy. The resultant weapon was finished, in the form of two pilot guns, in late 1940 and demonstrated on the 8th of November. The pilot guns were designed by George Lanchester and thus were named after him.


Lanchester Pilot Gun 3. For whatever reason, this model appears to have no rear sights. It was tested in November 1940.


Lanchester Pilot Gun 4. This is the model used for endurance trials and was essentially the finished product. Tested on the 28th of November 1940.


The Lanchester pilot guns were tested again on the 13th of November 1940 and were tested with a variety of 9x19mm catridges, including Winchester flat-nose, ICI, Bergmann, Beretta, and German military issue. The first pilot gun failed to discharge the Winchester and ICI ammunition, but the second did not run into any major issues and was considered on-par with the German MP-38.

On November 28th, further trials of the Lanchester pilot guns took place in the presence of both George Lanchester and Major Reginald V. Shepherd of the Design Department at RSAF Enfield. The Lanchester was now in its fourth pilot gun form and fired 5204 rounds with 26 stoppages. It passed all the mandatory tests but did not function when loaded with Beretta-made ammunition. Otherwise it was considered good to go and production rights were handed over to the Royal Navy for immediate manufacture as the Lanchester Mk.I. This weapon was issued to the Air Force and Navy until 1941, when it was simplified as the Mk.I*, which had no fire selector and fixed iron sights.


The Lanchester Mk.I. Known as the “British Schmeisser”. It was heavy, sturdy, and solidly built - typical of Naval manufacture.


The Lanchester Mk.I*. Fully-automatic only with fixed iron sights. Many Mk.I*s were simply modified Mk.Is, but were not marked as such.


The Lanchester was good but production costs were too high to equip the army. Something cheaper and quicker to manufacture was sought. In January 1941, an extremely simplified model was designed by George Lanchester and demonstrated at Enfield on the 10th of January 1941, and at Hythe on the 21st. The prototype was essentially a Lanchester stripped down to the bare minimum. It consisted of a simple tubular body made from steel and grips made from Tufnel. It was supposed to have a folding buttstock but for whatever reason this was never fitted. The only real change to the base design was the inclusion of a fire selector just in front of the trigger grouping. Otherwise it was internally the same as the Lanchester Mk.I.

A second simplified prototype was also conceived by George Lanchester and differed in that the cocking slot was now on the left side of the gun and had a much lighter bolt which was about an inch shorter than the original. The grips were redesigned to be more ergonomic, and a simple single-strut stock was fitted to the rear of the pistol grip.


The first simplified Lanchester prototype. Essentially the forerunner to the Sten. The cocking slot has a safety recess.


The second simplified Lanchester prototype. This version had left-hand cocking and a three-position fire selector.


Both simplified prototypes of the Lanchester were tested but rejected. But from this concept, the Sten was born. It was developed in early 1941 by Major Shepherd and Harold J. Turpin, who worked at the Design Department at Enfield. Thus the weapon was christened the STEN (Shepherd, Turpin, ENfield). The design was an incredibly simple blowback system based on the Lanchester with a fixed firing pin and simple cylindrical bolt. The first version of the Sten, the Mk.I, had wooden furniture, a conical flash hider, and a hinged fore grip, a feature not seen on any of the subsequent models. The Mk.I was cheaper than the Lanchester but still too expensive; it was simplified further as the Mk.I* in late 1941. The Mk.I* ditched the wooden embellishments, the flash hider and the fore grip feature. Throughout 1941, over 100,000 Mk.I and Mk.I* Stens were produced and issued to the army.


The Sten Mk.I. The original model of the Sten, with features such as a folding fore grip and a flash hider that were not seen in later models.


The Sten Mk.I*. The first of many steps to simplifying an already very basic gun. Although production was somewhat brief, thousands were made.


In mid-1941, the Mk.II Sten was designed. It was a bare-bones version of a gun which was already very basic. The main difference between the Mk.I and the Mk.II Stens was that the Mk.II had a new barrel that could not be interchanged with the original Mk.I barrel. The Mk.II barrel had only two grooves whereas the Mk.I had six. Externally, the Mk.II was incredibly minimalist. There were two main versions of the Mk.II produced: one with a wireframe stock and one with a single-strut stock. Neither were particularly pleasant to shoot, owing to the poor ergonomics. The upshot of all this was that the Mk.II Sten was incredibly cheap to produce en masse for the army and, as an added bonus, proved very easy for anti-Nazi partisans to copy in workshops.

The Mk.II Sten was tested at Pendine on from the 7th to the 25th of August 1941 and a glaring fault was discovered. The magazines were made from stamped sheet metal, which meant that the feed lips were prone to failure. If the magazine feed lips were misaligned even slightly with the magazine well, the gun would jam. The magazines were also highly susceptible to dirt and sand. All of this basically meant that the Mk.II Sten was highly unreliable if not handled with care, and even then it was probably inevitable that it would fail at some point during the heat of battle. But the army was faced with a choice between a mass of unreliable Mk.IIs, or a handful of Thompsons, Lanchesters and Mk.I Stens. They opted for the former.


The Sten Mk.II. The most successful version of the Sten, with several millions being manufactured during the war and used by various countries.


The Sten Mk.II with bayonet and single-strut stock.


Prototype T42 submachine gun, based on the Sten Mk.II. It had a single-column magazine and a redesigned trigger group.



Sten Mk.II with SMLE stock. This was made as an experimental model only and never issued.


Sten Mk.II with wireframe pistol grip, designed for paratroopers.


Copy of the Sten Mk.II made in a workshop by Danish partisans.


The Mk.II Sten was by far the most successful model of the Sten gun, with over 2,000,000 being produced throughout World War II. It was first issued to British and Canadian troops during the raid on Dieppe on the 19th of August 1942 and continued to be issued until 1945. It was also issued in considerable numbers to the Free French Forces, including the French Resistance.

In 1943, the toy manufacturer Line Brothers Ltd. were contracted to produce the Mk.III Sten, which was made from a single, riveted sheet metal tube that was welded at the top. The ejection also had an extra safety precaution that consisted of a simple finger guard. The barrel was fixed inside the tubular body, which could not be disassembled. In Canada, the Mk.III was manufactured by Long Branch Arsenal.


The Sten Mk.III. Manufactured by Line Bros. Yet another simplification to lower the cost of manufacture.


On the other hand, this prototype Mk.III with a wooden SMLE-style stock would have been substantially more expensive to manufacture.


An experimental Mk.III made at Enfield. The trigger grouping is level with the ejection and the cocking handle is on top.


The Mk.IV was the only one of the Sten “marks” not to be issued to the army. In fact, it never evolved past the prototype stage. It was designed in 1943 with paratroopers in mind, with a shorter barrel and folding stock. The first version of the Mk.IV had a conical flash hider and a very unusual pistol grip and trigger guard arrangement that was designed to facilitate for thick winter gloves. It was a mere 27 inches in length. After it was trialed at Pendine at rejected for improvements, a second version known as the Mk.IVB was developed which was designed to be fired with one hand. To achieve this, the balance of the weapon was changed by moving the trigger grouping forward to the middle of the gun. The trigger mechanism had to be completely redesigned to allow this. It was 24 inches in length but uncomfortable to fire. Besides its flaws, there was no immediate requirement for the Mk.IV model so it was never developed any further.


The Sten Mk.IV. Produced as a prototype only. It was designed for paratroopers and soldiers operating in cold weather conditions.


The Sten Mk.IVB. Designed to be fired one-handed. The shortest version of the Sten by far, it was more a machine pistol than a submachine gun.


The Sten Mk.IVS. A silenced prototype of which only one was ever made.


In 1944, the Mk.V Sten appeared. It was a much more presentable weapon and a far cry from the crude Mk.II  The Mk.V featured a wooden butt, pistol grip and fore grip. The fore grip was ditched in later models. The front sights were also redesigned and lifted from the No.4 SMLE service rifle. Internally, the bolt was improved with a cutaway that cleared the trigger disconnector when the bolt came over the sear. The resultant weapon was of excellent quality and made to a much higher standard than its precursors. Unfortunately, cheaply-made magazine were still being issued and consequently the Mk.V was still just as liable to failure as the earlier models, although this was not the fault of the gun itself.

The Mk.V Sten was issued extensively to paratroopers after D-Day and saw considerable use during Operation Market Garden in Arnhem, and issue of the Mk.V continued until the war in Europe ended in May 1945.


An early model Mk.V. This version had a fore grip which was not seen on later models. The stock could be detached for paratroopers.


The Sten Mk.V. The most polished version of the Sten manufactured during the war. It was much more reliable than the Mk.II and was issued in 1944.


Many variations of silenced Sten guns were also developed. British interest in silenced weapons began in 1940 when British Commandos demanded a quiet gun for eliminating lone sentries during covert raids. Initially they were issued silenced Thompsons made by RSAF Enfield, but these were too heavy and expensive to deploy in any numbers. When the Sten Mk.II appeared, Enfield developed a suppressed model called the Mk.IIS. It was designed by a Polish exile who was now serving with the Special Operations Executive, Lt. Kulikowski. The suppressor consisted of a series of metal cups wrapped around and in front of the barrel, with a rubber plug at the end. When the weapon was fired, the gases seeped out the sidewall of the barrel and their energy dissipated. The bullet traveled through the metal cups and penetrated the plug, which prevented the gases from escaping. These metal cups were encased in a perforated jacket which was surrounded by an additional jacket.


Prototype Mk.IIS. The silencer contained 24 baffles. With so much weight at the front end and so little in the stock, it would have been awkward to handle.


The Sten Mk.IIS. The most successful silenced weapon of World War II.


The Mk.IIS was issued to Commandos, the SOE, and other British special forces units, as well as resistance fighters across Europe. It was designed to be fired in single shots. Reportedly, the sound of the bolt was louder than the gunshot itself. The main drawback of the Mk.IIS was that it had an effective range of only 100 meters.


Sten Mk.II with an SOE-made silencer and basic wooden stock, issued to special agents in France.


The Sten Mk.VI. Basically the Mk.IIS principle applied to the Sten Mk.V. It replaced the Mk.IIS late in the war.


Late in the war, the Mk.V Sten was successfully silenced using a similar principle and this model was called the Mk.VI. It did not see as much use as the Mk.IIS but was probably, all factors considered, the best silenced weapon of the war. It was succeeded by the Sterling L34A1 silent submachine gun.

Awkward things that happened during claps that the fab four doesn’t want you to know about:
  • Kobra bringing everything to a standstill because he lost his contact lens. Had everyone, including Dracs, looking for them.
  • Party losing his pants and refusing to put them back on.
  • Everyone pointing at Korse and yelling ‘Bald!’ because the sun was reflecting just right and it blinded them.
  • Jet tripping over his own feet because he couldn’t see through his hair.
  • Party trying to jump over the hood of the Trans Am dukes of hazard style and hitting himself right in the balls.
  • Ghoul torturing a Drac by reciting vegan brownie recipes
  • Kobra punching out an exterminator so hard they were flung back like ten feet but no one seeing it.
  • Kobra karate chopping a blaster in half when no one was looking
  • Poison’s gun jamming and him throwing it at a Drac before freaking out and trying to get it back
  • Jet ‘accidentally’ suplexing Ghoul
  •  Ghoul ‘accidentally’ kicking Korse in the balls so hard that Party felt so bad he called off the fight
  • Kobra pantsing Korse during the middle of a clap and no one knowing what to do
  • Ghoul and Kobra accidentally making out
  • Jet stopping the fight because he found someone’s finger and needed to make sure it wasn’t any of the guy’s.
  • Party and Jet getting into a fight with a group of maggot babies because they kept touching their hair
  • Ghoul forgetting to fill the Trans Am with gas so their ‘dramatic’ escape took several hours.
  • Party being so sleep deprived he started fighting the cacti instead of the Dracs
errant setting + worldbuilding

It’s kinda complicated? Europe, in this setting, is basically still in a 600-year dark age. But that’s not indicative of the rest of the world!

The main diff right off the bat is the geography itself. This world has way more land bridges. The continents are also a little closer to each other, Pangaea style, so intermingling of cultures happened earlier and with different overall results. Magic changes the lay of the land as well. While it’s naturally occurring in all areas of the world, like…water, I guess, there are hot spots of intense saturation. Wellsprings. Europe is basically one huge hot spot.

Here’s how some of the continents break down in terms of advancement and society (I’ve only figured a handful out, sorry!). These are really rough generalizations:

Upper Africa/The Middle East holds the most technologically advanced societies in the world. The library of Alexandria was never lost, and became a cornerstone in the region’s scientific advancement. There’s low arcane activity in these areas (the ley lines through here dump excess power straight into Europe, like rivers to an ocean), so people spend less time fighting fucking dragons or whatever and more time progressing society. Magic is used in a highly regulated manner, usually for powering automatons and gem matrixes (kinda the equivalent to computers). Automated prosthetics and basic motor vehicles also exist. 

note: weaponry in this setting is mmmmostly still swords just because magical interference makes mechanics jam, but guns can still be used in areas of low arcane radiation

Invading the Americas went…badly for Europe. One key factor was that while magic was well-studied there, it was—unlike in Europe—done for mostly non-combat uses. Which led to the development of semi-modern medicine. Which prevented the diseases brought by Europeans from ravaging their cultures, which really fuckin helped. They’ve deadlocked hard against the invaders across multiple centuries. The only ‘success’ was made by the conquistadores; after decades of tensions with the Aztec and Incan empires (which had allied to repel them), a truce was proposed involving intermarriage of high nobility. This unified a big chunk of South America with the Spanish Empire in a peaceful manner and encouraged a lot of beneficial immigration on both sides. Spain + South America is kind of a power couple in this setting.

Polynesia is a trading empire boasting the most beautiful islands and diverse peoples in the world. It established itself early on as a safe oasis, acting as a meeting place for international councils and haven for immigrants alike. Great 3000-foot docks are built out into the ocean that hold some of the most diverse markets on the planet; beneath the islands, there are underwater cities that stretch up to a mile deep. Unlike many areas, Polynesia has endeavored to not discriminate against anyone—or, more importantly, anything—in order to keep the place as inviting as possible. Scholars from the east who want to study magic will often pass over dangerous Europe and instead go to Polynesia, seeking out more monstrous European expatriates for research.

Lastly, Europe. Like I said, Europe is one enormous magical hotbed. Mutation to the degree that you see in, say, a glutton knight or dragon is super rare elsewhere—I mean, magical creatures aren’t uncommon, but sufficient contamination for a human to become a monster? What the fuck? That you could get that much arcane exposure in day-to-day life is absurd and terrifying to the rest of the world. Europeans are seen as a little bit insane and a whole lot backwards; while they’ve made great magical progresses from sheer necessity, they can’t even get a gun working reliably. To people who have already figured out basic cars, that’s a little ridiculous.

The saving grace of Europe is that their arcane knowledge and internal military efforts are pretty fuckin great. All countries are allied in a weird medieval UN, and function kind of as a single big country with lots of little city-states. Knights are trained and educated rigorously, and legally 2/3rds of all active knights must remain in the region (even in times of war) to deal with internal magical threats, which means that Europe has a pretty killer defense system.

And then there are the tales of the once-human horrors rallying alongside their former mortal companions in times of need. Of dragons mobilizing in huge groups to blast nuclear fire down on armies, witches eating the eyes of entire companies in the dead of night, too-quiet things of gleaming metal and teeth slinking out of woodlands to terrorize troops. Europe is a bogeyman-filled no-man’s-land to the rest of the world.