guide to drawing

anonymous asked:

Could you explain how you draw so well please, like a step by step drawing guide. I love your art and I can figure out how to draw a body/face/hands/expressions. Did I mention I love your art?

Thank you!

I did try to make a drawing tutorial on some parts but I don’t have enough time and it’s not really reaching a lot of people… I’m planning to stream the tutorials instead in the later dates? I mean it’s much more easier that way, you can ask questions regarding to draw and all that other stuff.

I’m still thinking about it though…

9

!! ART TUTORIAL !!

This is my first real attempt at doing a walkthrough for one of my landscapes, I’d really appreciate some feedback!

it is pretty much my workflow process, there’s always something slightly big to change during render I should have solved earlier!

Anyway everyone, feel free to message me if you have any questions and I hope this helps anyone!!

i made a handy guide for drawing elf ears

( this is joaks and in good fun so don’t be a fucking geek about this post bc we get it you gotta have those lobes)

9

I could do this all day 

External image

She will fit into your favorite moba game very good character garanteed

Edit: Holy shit it’s a joke please stop tagging this as reference/helpful/wow so good please stop using this as reference please stop thinking this is your goal please stop holy crap holy cRAP

You need to seriously re-evaluate  yourself if you believe the incredibly narrow and offensive things in these gifs oMgGG

4

Create a floor/Wall/Ceiling quick with this guide!

Transform 2D space into 3D space right before your eyes without having to mess around with a perspective ruler.

Adjust your camera angles!

Create better and more dynamic illustrations with this quick fix!

Sketch at the bottom:

Shima belongs to @baoxuu

Legion belongs to me

(overwatch is fun)

TRASNFORM INDEED (I’m not changing it)

Psst:

Like what you see? Consider following me! 

ALL THE ART THINGS! :>

10 inspiring and helpful YouTube channels for digital artists

People are asking us how the art we share can be so good.

The answer this time isn’t so simple. An artist has his own way on shaping his style, he takes his time to experiment and so it becomes quite difficult for others to try learning his art style and making it their own. It’s even wrong.

But we can tell you that many artists learn by getting inspired by others’ art. Watching an artist while he paints can be motivating - and of course it can teach you a few technical tricks.

So, here there are ten YouTube channels you should check out.

1. FZD School of design

It’s a school founded by Feng Zhu, amazing concept artist with a lot of experience in video games, films and commercials. His videos are real episodes/lessons and they are very helpful. And, well, they even have a school in Singapore…

2. China digital painting

This channel doesn’t feature tutorials but shares full video processes by Chinese artists. In this period we are seeing many young artists inspired by an art style that’s typically Chinese - it features dramatic lighting and mood. Mind, though, that such technique can be found in other masters like Bouguereau and Rembrandt.

3. Ctrl + Paint

A channel dedicated to the digital painting in Photoshop. Very helpful for those beginners who want to learn how to use the software and how to get better with art in general.

4. Level Up!

One of the most known groups of digital art on Facebook can be found on YouTube as well. The founders are Wojtek Fus and Darek Zabrocki. Each session (episode) features a different digital artist. This is great because you can compare the different painting processes. The main theme of this channel is concept art and fantasy/sci-fi illustrations.

5. JJ canvas

This is the channel of Jorge Jacinto. He uploads speedpaintings, but they are very inspiring if you want to look at how a wonderful surreal landscape can be created in twenty minutes - in time-lapse of course.

6. Webang111

Another channel with time-lapse videos. Very inspiring if you are into colorful and cartoony illustrations.

7. Ross Draws

His art is wonderful and his videos are super funny! Check out his channel if you want to see how a fantasy illustration can be created from a simple idea - I mean, he starts with two rough lines to close the video with a breathtaking illustration. Crazy.

8. The Portrait Art

Okay, we know. This channel is not about digital art. But it’s amazing art anyway and if you are into realistic portraits, you can get inspired by watching these videos.

9. Cubebrush

Another channel with time-lapse videos, but a few are commented. The videos are about 2D and 3D paintings.

10. Noah Bradley

This artist is a master in the concept field and he doesn’t only talk about his digital method but about his career as well, giving lots of hints on how to become a better artist and how to enter the art industry.

We hope this post helps you. Good luck!


Other articles:

What you need to know to become a digital artist 

8 helpful guides for digital artists!


Master the Art of Speed Painting: Digital Painting Techniques

40 Study Tips & Tricks

I thought to write down the “script” to one of my most viewed videos, with 40 study tips & tricks. It’s easier to read them and pass on the word!

Organization Tips:

1. Incorporate homework and classes in you daily planner – that will give you an overall glimpse of how your week will be about and how much time you need to spend in your studying sessions!

2. Color coordinate classes – be it notes, your planner, your textbooks or binders, pick a unique color for each class and work around the hues of that color to get more organized!

3. Make your own syllabus – if your professor doesn’t provide a syllabus for your class, try to make one before the school year working around your given textbooks or other given material.

4. Make study guides – make a study guide from your syllabus and draw before each topic two boxes: one for a midtest and one for the final test. When you have one of these tests, check the boxes when you’ve finished studying the chapter so you won’t miss anything!

5. Reference your material throughout – most of the times, we students work with in-class notes, textbooks and a syllabus. Since we get small bits of information here and there it’s important to reference every page throughout all your material so you can quickly access your information without having to flip endlessly through pages!

6. Keep a dashboard nearby – Whenever you use a notebook or a binder, make a dashboard on the first page with post it notes so you can quickly scribble any questions, homework or page numbers. When you get home, you just need to open your dashboard and attend those notes.

7. Print any tests, exercises and exams you can find – keep those in the end of your binder. These are perfect to practice before exams and tests because they really reflect what you will be tested about. Set an alarm clock for the deadline and start working on those!

8. Condense – organization disappears when you have too many of everything. Working with more than one planner in your life will make everything chaotic. If you think you need a second planner because you don’t have enough space to write in the first one, it’s because you don’t have available time as well. Don’t fool yourself and set achievable goals!

9. Customize your textbooks – most of the times, textbooks are formal books where information is hard to come by. Make your own tabs and write every chapter on them so they stick out – flag any charts, tables or graphics. Everything needs to be incredibly accessible!

10 Print a special planning sheet before finals: Organizing your studying by chapters and/or topics before finals is tremendously important since it lets you organize the amount of time you dedicate to each subject,

Study Sessions and Time Management

11. Save at least one afternoon or one morning a week for intensive studying. These is your “life-saver” – when you get so full of homework and projects that you can’t incorporate them into your daily academic routine, one free afternoon to organize your school life will really come in handy! Make an appointment with yourself!

12. Prepare in advance – although most professors may not ask you to prepare a class in advance, if you have the means to, go ahead. Grab a sheet and make a summary of the chapter your class will be about. Write the major topics and key information and take that guide to class. When your professor repeats previously studied information, you will be able to understand everything much better!

13. Never leave something behind – Even if you have a more light class, where professors don’t request homework or any side projects, don’t let that fool you! Be disciplined and be your own professors! Make your own projects and learn everything you can so you can nail those finals when they arrive.

14. Write your questions – most of the time, in a heavy study session, we come up with tons of questions and sometimes we just leave them behind. Write them down in your dashboard or a small notebook and ask your professors (personally or via e-mail). You can also ask your schoolmates in a facebook group created for that purpose!

15. Set an alarm clock and reward yourself – even if you study during an entire afternoon your studying will be pointless if you don’t take regular breaks. Set an alarm clock for one hour/one hour and a half and then take a 15 minute break. Never study for more than 2 hours straight! Even if you don’t notice, you’ll get less and less focused.

16. . Make a list – before each study session I like to grab my notepad and write down everything that I need to do before my session ends: the chapters I need to read, the pages I need to go through and the homework I need to complete. Sometimes I even write theses lists when I’m in college so I’ll have more determination to complete those tasks once I get home.

17 Work on the least interesting thing first. There are always classes or projects that we like the least – and those are the ones that we need to tackle first. You will start your studying session concentrated, which will let you go through the worst tasks faster.

18 Print, print, print. try to print everything you can and never study from your computer. Having your PDF files printed at hand will let you concentrate better, highlight and write some notes in the margins. You can take these everywhere with you and even turn them into small guides for future classes!

19. If you finish ahead, don’t quit. Perhaps the time you’ve saved for your study session has come to an end way before you have planned. That doesn’t mean you should stop right now – Take that time to review what you’ve learned so far or prepare other classes ahead of time!

20. Study in an organized space – make your own studying corner – bring everything you will need, from textbooks, binders and notebooks, to a cup of coffee and your computer. Keep them neatily organized on your desk so everything is at hand and on sight. Put on some soft background music (links down below) and adjust the lightning.

In class notes

21. If your professor provides PowerPoint slides before each class, print them (six or four per page) and bring them to class. Write in the margins and more throughout information in the back so it’s all condensed and tight. This is where you’ll take your notes. If you prefer to write on lined paper, think about copying some ruled paper to the back of your printed slides.

22. If your professor asks you to prepare your class in advance, try to make a small guide for each class. Open the comments column in MSWord and print the pages with that column. When you go to class, incorporate the in-class notes in that column, next to the relevant information so everything is nice and condensed.

23 If you are in a information-heavy class, try to adopt the Cornell method, which is the best, in my opinion, when you need to be a fast writer. There’s a video right here on how to use this method.

24. If you are in a bits-and-pieces class, which is that kind of class where the professor just gives a few key points and then gives practical examples or makes you work in group, try to adopt the box method – you can draw these boxes yourself or make them with post it notes – these are way more visual and perfect to memorize information.

25. Write in-class flashcards – if you don’t have flashcards around, make tiny flashcards on the top of your notes, where you cover the definitions you’ve written with the name of the definition. Each time you open your notes, try to remember the hidden definition. Automatic studying, every time!

26. Participate in class – nothing better than to be actively involved in your class discussion. For most of us, shy creatures, participating can be dreadful – but once you get out of your box, you’ll see how participating really makes you understand the subject!

27. If you have any questions during class, raise your hand and ask them. If your professor doesn’t like being interrupted, write them down and approach them in the end of the class. Sometimes, the little things we don’t understand are exactly the ones that come up on the final exam!

28. Ask for examples. Examples are probably the thing that makes your brain connect the information faster. If your professor isn’t keen on providing examples, suggest your own and see if your answer comes up right. Sometimes, examples are the thing that really makes us understand our material and our definitions, since they transform formal information into relatable events.

29. Sit at the front. It sounds too straightforward but sitting at the front really makes wonders. You won’t get distracted by what you classmates are doing, you will focus on the professor, who is right in front of you and you will resist the temptation of going to Facebook and Instagram during a boring presentation.

30. Write a brief summary at the end of the class. During those five minutes where everyone is dismissed and leaving the room, write a brief summary of that classes’ key points in the back of a page – this is fundamental in the Cornell method but can be used in any other method as well.

Finals Guide

31 Skim through your material two times: at first, you should start by studying your material starting from the end. The last lessons will be fresh in your memory and it’s very important to reinforce your knowledge on these while you can. In the second reading, you should start from the beginning, as usual. It’s important to make these two readings so you can go through the information in a much more flexible way.

 32. Make a mindmap of each chapter. A mindmap is a chart that relates key words and important information, making it easy to understand the relationship and hierarchy between such key words. Use colors and images to memorize your material better. Oh, and don’t forget to check out my video on how to make mindmaps!

33. Read each of the titles and try to say out loud its contents, explaining each concept and the relationship between them. Imagine you are the teacher and are lecturing that subject to a crowd. If you skip any of the subjects, do it all over again. The more you repeat, the better you will memorize.

34. It’s time for some flash cards!  Write the topic or the title on one side and the meaning or the explanation on the other. Try to cover as many topics or titles as you can and go through your cards while memorizing as best as you can each of the concepts. Try to do it backwards if you have time to do so!

35. On the day before the exam, skim through your mindmaps and flash cards again and always try to study while talking. Saying your content out loud will force your brain to relate information in a much more cohesive way and you’ll memorize everything much better.

36. Read the entire exam from top to bottom. Underline or circle any important words that you think will be crucial in you answer. After that, calculate how much time you should spend answering each question: this simple calculation will take only twenty seconds and will help you organize your time. Try to save five minutes at the end for revisions.

37. If you are solving a written exam and not multiple choice, try as much as possible to organize each answer in a structured way, saving two lines just to present your line of thought and writing each different argument in a different paragraph. Draft a conclusion at the end to underline the centre of your answer. Sometimes softly underlining some keywords is important to make your professor notice that you’ve correctly given importance to certain concepts.

38. Use these symbols for each question: one dot if you aren’t sure of the answer, two dots if you are sure of your answer and a circle if you are completely unaware of your answer. Start by answering any question with two dots; after those are all answered, go on through the two dots question. Leave the circle questions to the end – and ALWAYS answer them! Even if you don’t know what they’re about, who knows if you will be able to come up with something right?

39. Review your test one final time – many times, we make a lot of mistakes under stress and now is when you should spot them and amend them. This can be the difference between a B and an A!

40. Don’t take this too seriously – school is an important aspect of our lives but it isn’t everything. Failure comes many times and these failures can even drive you away from something that was simply not meant to be. Don’t stress out because everyone goes through the same!

anonymous asked:

how do you draw tears?

Hi, Anon! I’ll do my best to walk you through my thought process. 

(This post got kinda long, so if you’re not up for reading, here are kawacy’s process breakdown and JaneMere’s Water Drops Tutorial o/)

Tears as seen in real life are…pretty uninteresting, tbh so to make them look more feel-inducing than reality, it helps to exaggerate, especially when it comes to size and contrast

Here are some things I consider when sketching:

I like to keep it to two trickles per eye flowing from the corners to, but by no means is that a rule. To give tears a sense of weight, I draw them as thin streams that gather into large droplets depending on where gravity is taking them. 

You might want to push the size even further so that they’re more visible at a distance. Context and mood is also an important thing to consider; as a general guideline, thinner lines imply delicacy while gushing waterfalls are usually more comical. Feel free to let anime/cartoons/comics (etc etc) be your guide, since they can go really heavy on the exaggeration for a wider range of expression. Have some Mako Mankanshoku tears from Kill la Kill as an example!

Awww :’D
I mean
Awww D’: 

Anyways, once I have my sketch down, I go ahead and block them out. I’m using a white tinted with blue for color contrast from the warm colors of the skin, but it doesn’t matter that much if you lower the opacity as much as I have. In any case, I don’t want to use my whitest white yet since I’m saving that for shiny highlights.

I then duplicate my block-in, darken the layer, then erase from inside the shapes I made. This is my “line art” of sorts.

Time to shade! Since tears are essentially water, I treat them like gemstones/translucent objects. Similar to shiny materials like metal, there’s a high-contrast transition between light and shadow in both edges and value, but with transparent objects, light passes through them, bounces around, and “gathers” on the side opposite of the surface that’s receiving the light, like so: 

Not the most amazing rendering in the world, but I hope it gets my point across x’D

Moving on!

To compensate the loss of detail from zooming out, I use black to amp up the contrast (doubly important since I’m using a pale-skinned person in my example). If that’s too harsh for you, feel free to play around with colors and opacity. (Again with the whole emotional context thing. Adapt to the situation!) You can even use a soft brush or put the shading through a blur filter, but I usually choose to keep the edges hard because again, contrast.

Now for the fun part: highlights! Shine bright like a diamond : DDD

Amping up the contrast some more by breaking out the whites! I suppose you could stop here, but this still isn’t shiny enough for me yet, >:3c

I go over the edges of the tears with white to punctuate how ridiculously shiny they are. I also like to throw in some bright reds/oranges reflecting off the droplets to imply healthy, glowing skin as well as a dash of a cooler color for general environmental lighting. I also added some cast shadows to the tears. Not terribly dark, since light passes through the tears as opposed to being blocked out.

Again, while I am basing my decisions off real-life principles, a lot of these choices are highly stylistic. Whether you’re drawing small, have time constraints or you’re just plain lazy, you can always pick and choose! This is just my current approach, so while you’re free to try out my workflow if you literally have no idea what you’re doing, I do encourage you to experiment to see what appeals you personally.

Hope this helps! Honestly, I’m quite flattered that anyone would ask me how I draw things :’D
If anyone does end up using this guide, poke me and show me what you’ve come up with; I’d love to see :D

Iriko   -  Guide dog puppy
Inspired by puppy___yooco (Instagram) 

The summer vacation is over. I could not post for a long time…
Iriko is a Guide dog Puppy I met on the Instagram. :)
They will live in the family of Puppy walker volunteers for about a year. The figure of Irico growing up every day is posted In puppy_yooco’s blog,
When the time comes, they have to leave their families…
But they never forget the affection they received from their families. :)

I tried ChalkArt for the first time.

夏休みが終わりました。久しぶりの投稿です。
今回、インスタグラムで出会った盲導犬パピーのイリコちゃんを描かせていただきました^^ puppy_yoocoさんのご了承のもとTumblrに掲載させていただきました。彼らは子供のうちの約一年間、パピーウォーカーボランティアさんのご家族の元で育てられます。puppy__yoocoさんのブログでは日毎に大きく育っていくイリコちゃんの姿が掲載されています。
時が来れば、ご家族と別れなければなりません。しかし、彼らはそのご家族から受けた愛情をいつまでも忘れません。

今回チョークアートに初挑戦して描かせていただきました。
イリコちゃん、ご家族の皆様、機会をいただき本当に有難うございました。

Too soft,,,, too soft

theniceprincess-tnp  asked:

Quick question, how do you draw Ozzy in his original Disney design so well? I try and I can never get his body to come out right, any tips for a fellow Ozzy fangirl? I'm Oswald trash so if you can help me out I've got content to spam for a while.

oh gosh, thank you! i honestly always feel like i’m slightly off-model when i draw him haha like i have my own little style going on when i draw him sometimes… but anyway ummm i guess it just takes a lot of practice and playing around with shapes and stuff?? also just study official art of oswald and take note of the little details!

in regards to how i draw his body (in my style at least) here’s a little quick messy guide i guess?! it’s really not as tough once you figure out his body is basically just a sphere and an itty bitty cylinder… he’s very simplistic!

i tend to break these rules a lot though like especially if i want to make him look more cartoony and less stiff-looking i’ll go more off-model and exaggerate stuff

sorry that wasn’t too exciting i’m not very good at explaining my art process wahhh but i hope maybe it helped a little! like i said, practice practice practice! you can only get better from here!