guatemalan artists

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Carlos Mérida. Estampas Del Popol Vuh. 1943. 

A series of original lithographs by the Guatemalan artist Mérida published in Mexico in the 1940s. The pieces are based on the 16th century Mayan manuscript Popol Vuh, the Quiché people’s elaborately poetic book of creation, a “Book of the People.” More completely: “a corpus of mytho-historical narratives of the Post-Classic people of the Western Guatemalan Highlands. Popol Vuh’s prominent features are its creation myth, its diluvian suggestion, its epic tales of the Hero Twins Hunahpú and Xbalanqué, and its genealogies. The myth begins with the exploits of anthropomorphic ancestors and concludes with a regnal genealogy, perhaps as an assertion of rule by divine right. As with other texts, a great deal of Popol Vuh’s significance lies in the scarcity of early accounts dealing with Mesoamerican mythologies.”

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Imagining Empty Worlds with @mau.cp

For more invisible worlds and fooling perspectives, follow @mau.cp on Instagram.

(This interview was conducted in Spanish.)

Things aren’t always what they seem. At least that’s the mantra behind Guatemalan visual artist Mauricio Contreras-Paredes (@mau.cp), who likes to create visual incentives to prompt an interaction between art and spectators.

“Imagine an empty world, without curves, almost totally blue. It’s a world where perspectives fool you and where planes interact almost randomly. That’s my artistic style,” says Mauricio.

Mauricio’s choice of blue, however, is not random. “I am really invested in blue because gaseous bodies or transparent liquids, like the sky or the sea, are perceived as blue. As my work explores invisible or imaginary architecture, somehow transparent blue is conceptually perfect.”

Mauricio enjoys his creative process more than the final piece and also combines pictures of food with his own art. “I believe that food is also an art, a brief kind of art. What’s the difference between a dish by Ferran Adrià and a painting by Picasso?” he asks.