gsbinthemoment

“On the last day of one of his classes, [Lecturer] Rob Siegel gave his class advice that struck the core of me, and that I really needed at that moment. ‘Remember, your career and life are marathons, not sprints.’

This allowed me to pause and realize that pressing the more button is not always the answer. Sometimes just making a decision, albeit an informed one, is the answer. If it doesn’t work out as intended, you have the privilege of learning the lessons and moving forward to the next chapter. A life well lived is one where you cherish each and every step of the journey instead of worrying endlessly about achieving your exact goal.” –Kudzi Chikumbu (MBA '16) #gsbinthemoment

Photo by Toni Bird

View more reflections from the class of 2016: http://stanford.io/1UKX8Wg

Niamh Gavin (MBA ’16) reflects on her Stanford GSB experience: “For every hour there are at least ten alternate classes, talks, activities, dinners or events that you could be attending. However, the upside of being spoilt for choice is that it forces you to prioritize and evaluate how best to use your time. Being thoughtful as to how each hour is spent is something I hope to take with me post graduation.”

View more ‪#‎gsbinthemoment‬ student portraits and reflections:http://stanford.io/1T2bT3e

Photo by Natalie White

Morgan Harcrow (MBA ’16) reflects on her Stanford GSB experience: “I’ve realized the tremendous power of the growth mindset. Shifting to the growth mindset makes all things learnable, changeable, and doable with effort. The growth mindset mantra is to learn at all costs. Seeking to learn at all costs rather than to appear smart, together, kind, or happy at all costs has been freeing. As I prepare to leave the GSB and the amazing people and experiences of this place, I am confident that I will continue to grow and develop as a result of the lessons I have learned along the way.”

View more ‪#‎gsbinthemoment‬ student portraits and reflections: http://stanford.io/1T2bT3e

Photo by Toni Bird

“Professor David Bradford teaches a class called High Performance Leadership in which he challenges the concept of a heroic leader who knows and does all well, charging ahead to lead her flock at all times. He suggests instead, a much humbler candidate who is not only aware of her limitations, but is also willing to acknowledge them with her team, so that each may help her (whether by complementing or coaching) to compensate for those weaknesses. By establishing a culture in which self-improvement is the standard, this leader enables a grounded and high-performing team. It is this ability to work together to gauge what’s most appropriate – to put egos aside and focus on the task at hand – that makes for great impact.

David Bradford has completely set me free from trying to hide my imperfections and has given me a set of tools to try to expand my limitations and shape my best self. What a gift!” –Onsu Natalie Wegner (MSx ’16)

View more ‪#‎gsbinthemoment‬ student portraits and reflections: http://stanford.io/1T2bT3e

Photo by Toni Bird

“I am thrilled that my career aspiration to become a marketing professor is taking shape. I am attracted to this profession because I will have the opportunity to both develop new research with colleagues, as well as teach students in the classroom. I have always loved the energy and flow of new ideas that surround me when I set foot on a college campus.” –Anna Tuchman (PhD ’16) 

“Life is a journey, not a destination.” ­­–Ralph Waldo Emerson

We’re inviting Stanford MBA, MSx, and PhD students to stop and reflect on their aspirations, learnings, challenges, and joys. Check back each week for a glimpse into the Stanford GSB experience through our new student portrait series, [In the Moment]. 

“I learned a long time ago that pride is expensive, and there is only something to gain by making yourself vulnerable.” –Erik Wittreich (MSx ’14) #gsbinthemoment

“True leadership is often more about feeling than thinking. People remember how they feel about you (and we remember how we feel about others), and thus there is an important difference in terms of doing things right versus doing the right thing. 

Every personal interaction offers us an opportunity to make an impact. It’s up to us as to whether we seize the opportunity to engage, understand, respond, and ultimately, to do the right thing.” –Adnan Iqbal (MSx ‘14)

View more student portraits → http://stnfd.biz/wrABg #gsbinthemoment

“I believe that a successful leader empowers and develops people to make them successful personally and at work. Hiding our emotions makes us look stronger and more confident, but only in our minds. Being honest and vulnerable is a much richer way to lead,” shared Guille Spiller (MBA ‘14).

View more student portraits and reflections → http://stnfd.biz/vXaT8 #gsbinthemoment

“Developing emotional intelligence is what really makes a great leader – truly understanding the motivations and desired outcomes of your colleagues, customers and counterparties; reading the subtleties of a situation and dynamically adjusting your response; and knowing when you should look for more data, seek better insights, or simply ask for advice. When you can adjust your approach for every context, only then can you truly conquer every challenge.” –Matt Bereman (MSx ‘15) 

Read more reflections from the Class of 2015: http://stanford.io/19RVMmF ‪#‎gsbinthemoment‬

Photo by Toni Gauthier

“My favorite author Junot Diaz once said, ‘The safety of perfect work unrealized does not compare to the enormous beauty of flawed work realized. We have to endure as artists being extra bad. If you want to produce anything worth someone’s attention, first you have to suck at it for a very long time.’

I didn’t understand that quote until I saw the perseverance that Diaz was talking embodied in my classmates at the GSB. I’ve been inspired by their relentless pursuit of self-improvement, and emboldened by their willingness to persist in the slow burn needed to solve our world’s biggest problems, no matter how long it takes. They’ve taught me how to be comfortable living in that slow burn too, and that it’s ok to face an uncertain future tomorrow if the risks I take today are worthy of my values, vision and principles.

Most platitudes about fear or failure make it seem as if it’s all about taking the first step into the dark abyss – but it’s not. It’s about the moment after you take the first step. It’s about greeting the self-doubt and the unknown head on, looking it in the eye and learning to live in its presence. If you can see the beauty in flawed work realized or endure being extra bad for a long time, you can do great things. You’ll stumble because everyone does, but the difference between the ones that make it and the ones that don’t is that you just have to keep going.” –Kene Anoliefo (MBA ’16)

View more #gsbinthemoment student portraits and reflections: http://stanford.io/1T2bT3e

“I study the psychology of consumer financial decision making. When it comes to managing finances, it’s easy for people to feel overwhelmed and out of control. The goal of my research is to help consumers regain control and make better financial decisions.” –Emily Garbinsky (PhD ‘15). #gsbinthemoment

View more portraits and reflections from the Class of 2015: http://stanford.io/19RVMmF

Photo by Toni Gauthier

“I’ve always enjoyed sitting down and really figuring out how something works. For me it’s never been an ‘a-ha’ moment, but rather like slowly uncovering part of a tangled web – you can see more and more of the connections, but there’s always a lot remaining.” –Peter Schram (PhD ’16)
View more ‪#‎gsbinthemoment‬ student portraits and reflections: http://stanford.io/1T2bT3e

“I used to think that leaving a legacy meant those you left behind mourned your departure and yearned for your return. But I’ve come to learn that if I’ve truly done my job as a ‘leader of leaders,’ leaving a legacy will mean that no one even notices I’m gone.” –Eric Tsytsylin (MBA '14)

View more student portraits and reflections → http://stnfd.biz/wc3mE #gsbinthemoment

Catherine Chien (MSx ’16) reflects on her Stanford GSB experience: “The GSB impressed upon me that business is really about a philosophy on life. I saw this time and again – David Dodson’s playground rule that ‘sharing is not about giving a portion of your surplus… but giving something that you want to keep to another person who needs it more’, Rob Siegel’s advice to 'always assume good intent’, Matt Bannick’s question whether we felt 'entrusted with or entitled to our privilege’, Bill Meehan’s call to 'serve lives, serve organizations, serve the world’, our MSx slogan 'No Sloan left behind’, the kindness of many a GSB-er… I am very grateful to be part of this collaborative, creative and passionate fabric, and excited to bring this spirit with me as I venture forth." 

 View more ‪#‎gsbinthemoment‬ student portraits and reflections: http://stanford.io/1T2bT3e 

 Photo by Natalie White

“Leading the first ever Global Study Trip (GST) to my home country, Honduras, was one of the most rewarding and fulfilling experiences I had while at the GSB. The participants were so inquisitive and engaged. I learned so many new things about my country as I was able to see Honduras through 31 foreign, diverse, and attentive eyes. I didn’t feel like I showed them my country, we saw it together. I did not teach them, we taught each other.

This wonderful cultural exchange that ensued would not have been possible without the effort and coordination of the planning leadership team. One of my teammates later shared with me that my love for Honduras and my desire to successfully execute the first-ever trip to my country really drove them to go above and beyond. This experience taught me to never underestimate the motivating power of passion.” –Carolina Rivera (MBA ’16)

View more #gsbinthemoment student portraits and reflections: http://stanford.io/1T2bT3e

Photo by Toni Bird