“I almost feel bad for the young hearts who are about to embrace love for the first time. Do you remember that kind of love? It’s innocent and pure; it’s almost so hard to remember because at this point you’ve endured so much. You thought it’d last forever and it often left you breathless. You were young and brave and you’d never been heart broken. And then it shook you to your core, you were left helpless, confused and alone.

You’ve rebuilt yourself time and time again. Independence. Casual relations. A new love. (This is it, this is the one) Loss. Independence. It’s a cycle, but yet we almost crave it.

But here we are today. Reminiscing about the past. Love at most seems bittersweet and nostalgic. You’re almost too afraid for love again because you now know what it’s like to feel everything and nothing at once.”

- @blueeyes-greenlies
Some periods of our growth are so confusing that we don’t even recognize that growth is happening. We may feel hostile or angry or weepy and hysterical, or we may feel depressed. It would never occur to us, unless we stumbled on a book or a person who explained to us, that we were in fact in the process of change, of actually becoming larger, spiritually, than we were before. Whenever we grow, we tend to feel it, as a young seed must feel the weight and inertia of the earth as it seeks to break out of its shell on its way to becoming a plant. Often the feeling is anything but pleasant. But what is most unpleasant is the not knowing what is happening. Those long periods when something inside ourselves seems to be waiting, holding its breath, unsure about what the next step should be, eventually become the periods we wait for, for it is in those periods that we realize that we are being prepared for the next phase of our life and that, in all probability, a new level of the personality is about to be revealed.
—  Alice Walker, Living by the Word
10

A white man asked a black C-SPAN guest how to fight his own racial prejudice. Her answer was perfect.

When Heather McGhee, president of the public policy group Demos, got a question from a caller during her appearance at C-SPAN, it was not about the progressive ideals her group is known for. The question, instead, was about a different issue — directed, seemingly, at McGhee’s race (she’s black).

The caller presented a surprising, open admission of racism on national television — and, even more surprisingly, it came with a request to help address that racism.

McGhee thanked the caller for his honesty and question. Then she explained how all Americans of all races can help solve the subconscious racial biases that study after study have found almost all of us have.