group of roses

OK, I am Team Peter for a lot of reasons, but the main one is this: Peter is invested in this process, and he understands that this is as much his journey as it is Rachel’s. His insecurity at not getting the group date rose underscored for me that he is choosing Rachel as much as she is choosing a suitor. I wouldn’t be surprised if he left of his own volition, if he thought that there wasn’t enough between him and Rachel to potentially build a life together. He would wish her well, and move on to find the woman for him.

All these men are focused on simply winning Rachel’s affections, and outshining the other guys. Peter is focused on his own emotional needs as well. He wants a partner, and so he is making judgments based on that. He is aware that Rachel isn’t the only one with the power of choice.  

What I am saying is that if Peter and Rachel end up together, it won’t just be because she picked him, but that he chose her too, and that is truly beautiful.

3

February 22nd 1943: White Rose group executed

On this day in 1943, three members of the peaceful resistance movement in Nazi Germany, the White Rose, were executed. The White Rose, comprising students from the University of Munich and their philosophy professor, began in June 1942. The group secretly distributed leaflets protesting against the regime of Adolf Hitler and the war being waged in Europe, highlighting the repressive nature of the Nazi police state and drawing attention to the mistreatment of Jews. The group took precautions to avoid capture by keeping the White Rose group very small. However, on 18th February 1943, the siblings Sophie and Hans Scholl were discovered distributing leaflets by a university janitor, who informed the Gestapo. Hans and Sophie were arrested and immediately admitted guilt, hoping to avoid being coerced into implicating their fellow members of the White Rose, but after further interrogation were forced to give up the names. Four days later, the Scholls and Christoph Probst - some of the founding members of the group - were put on trial and found guilty of treason; they were sentenced to death. That same day, February 22nd, the three were executed by beheading at Stadelheim Prison. After their executions, the remaining members were arrested and killed, thus ending the White Rose resistance movement. The White Rose, alongside other groups like the Edelweiss Pirates, are an important example of Germans speaking out against Hitler’s regime, and their deaths are yet another in the litany of Nazi crimes.

“We will not be silent. We are your bad conscience. The White Rose will not leave you in peace!”

2

The complete list of American cities where neo-Nazis are known to operate

  • The number of neo-Nazi and other radical right-wing hate groups increased during Trump’s ascent to power, according to a recent report from the Southern Poverty Law Center.
  • From 2015 to 2016, the number of hate groups rose from 892 to 917, as fringe groups worked their way into the mainstream through Trump, whom white nationalists see as an ally to their cause.
  • Of those 917 hate groups, 99 of them are classified as neo-Nazi organizations, according to the SPLC’s Hate Map. 
  • They exist all across the country, and cities both big and small have experienced neo-Nazi and white nationalist activity.

Here is a complete list of cities home to neo-Nazi groups, according to the SPLC:

  • Alabama
    • Cullman
  • Arizona
    • Phoenix
    • Tucson
  • California
    • Los Angeles
    • Mountain View
    • Santa Cruz
    • Santa Monica
  • Colorado
    • Denver
  • Florida
    • Brandon
    • Orlando
  • Georgia
    • Villa Rica
  • Illinois
    • Bloomington
    • Canton
    • Lyons
    • Taylorville
    • Wood River
  • Indiana
    • Indianapolis
    • Warsaw
  • Iowa
    • Amana
  • Kentucky
    • Louisville
  • Louisiana
    • Converse
  • Maryland
    • Baltimore
  • Massachusetts
    • Cambridge
    • Lowell
  • Michigan
    • Detroit
    • Grand Rapids
    • Westland
    • Wyandotte
  • Missouri
    • Grovespring
    • St. Louis
  • Nebraska
    • Fairbury
    • Lincoln
  • Nevada
    • Carson City
    • Las Vegas
  • New York
    • Astoria
    • New York City
  • North Carolina
    • Asheville
    • Charlotte
    • Raleigh
  • Ohio
    • Columbus
    • Worthington
  • Pennsylvania
    • Philadelphia
    • Pittsburgh
  • South Dakota
    • Rapid City
  • Tennessee
    • Laurel Bloomery
    • Nashville
  • Texas
    • Austin
    • Dallas
    • San Antonio
    • Wichita Falls
  • Vermont
    • Burlington
  • Washington
    • Seattle
    • Spokane
  • West Virginia
    • Hillsboro
  • Wisconsin
    • Milwaukee
  • There are also a number of statewide neo-Nazi groups that are not affiliated with a specific city. In addition to the states listed above, there are statewide groups based in Connecticut, Delaware, Idaho, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, Utah, Virginia and Wyoming. Read more (2/27/17 2:12 PM)
2

February 22nd 1943: White Rose group executed

On this day in 1943, three members of the peaceful resistance movement in Nazi Germany, the White Rose, were executed. The White Rose, comprising students from the University of Munich and their philosophy professor, began in June 1942. The group secretly distributed leaflets protesting against the regime of Adolf Hitler and the war being waged in Europe, highlighting the repressive nature of the Nazi police state and drawing attention to the mistreatment of Jews. The group took precautions to avoid capture by keeping the White Rose group very small. However, on 18th February 1943, the siblings Sophie and Hans Scholl were discovered distributing leaflets by a university janitor, who informed the Gestapo. Hans and Sophie were arrested and immediately admitted guilt, hoping to avoid being coerced into implicating their fellow members of the White Rose, but after further interrogation were forced to give up the names. Four days later, the Scholls and Christoph Probst - some of the founding members of the group - were put on trial and found guilty of treason; they were sentenced to death. That same day, February 22nd, the three were executed by beheading at Stadelheim Prison. After their executions, the remaining members were arrested and killed, thus ending the White Rose resistance movement. The White Rose, alongside other groups like the Edelweiss Pirates, are an important example of Germans speaking out against Hitler’s regime, and their deaths are yet another in the litany of Nazi crimes.

“We will not be silent. We are your bad conscience. The White Rose will not leave you in peace!”