grist

EB: i mean grist.
EB: serves them right for ruining my posters. the bastards.
TT: Which posters?
EB: don’t you see? my sweet movie posters. look at them, they’re fucking ruined.
TT: John.
EB: ??????
TT: Are you suggesting that imps are responsible for defacing your movie posters?
EB: uh, YEAH?
TT: Your posters have looked like that ever since I first saw your room.
TT: The moment we started playing this game.
TT: I thought you had defaced them ironically to mock your father’s interests.
TT: John?
TT: …?
EB: VERY FUNNY ROSE HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

   EB: NICE JOKE
EB: GREAT JOKE THERE ROSE
EB: TOP OF THE LINE PRANK
EB: HE HE
EB: HA HA HA HA HA
TT: This is good.
TT: Laughter is probably the best way to avoid being especially melodramatic about the revelation.
EB: yes
EB: YES
EB: LET’S KEEP THIS JOKE GOING
EB: BECAUSE IT IS SUCH A GOOD ONE
EB: HA HA HA HA
EB: OH MY
EB: HA HA HA HA HA HA
EB: HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA    

Xuyen Pham’s GardenEast New Orleans, LA

After Xuyen Pham lost her New Orleans home to Hurricane Katrina, she turned the property into a farm to feed her community. She fled Vietnam with her husband and children at the end of the Vietnam War in 1975. After months in Southeast Asian refugee camps they were moved to Fort Chaffee in Arkansas. The family was eventually sponsored by a hotel owner in Oklahoma, but the cold proved too much so they moved yet again, settling in the “Mary Queen of Vietnam” community in East New Orleans.

This farm is surrounded by houses (we are right in the middle of a suburban housing tract in East New Orleans).

Xuyen stands amidst taro plants in her home garden. The plant stems are a base ingredient in traditional soups and congees found on most Vietnamese dinner tables. By growing taro and other vegetables, she keeps Vietnamese traditions alive in her community.

Xuyen’s definition of “food sovereignty”:The ability of community members to control food access (both effluent and influent) independent of outside food sources (such as supermarkets). Members of the community grow traditional fruits and vegetables and fisherfolk go shrimping, fishing, and crabbing to sell at local stores, the local Saturday farmers market, and most importantly, to feed their families and community members.

Xuyen is also a participant in a local New Orleans East aquaponics project. The project is being implemented byMQVN Community Development Corporation and was established originally by fisherfolk displaced by the BP oil drilling disaster as a way to create jobs and to ensure adequate food access in New Orleans East (a USDA-identified food desert). In the near future, she and her husband, with the help of MQVN Community Development Corporation, will construct greenhouses and an aquaponics growing system on their farm plot.

- Quoted From Grist’s Lexicon of Sustainability, a series of art installments that will be released weekly (on Fridays) throughout this winter. “Food Sovereignty” is only the second installment, so sign up follow this project and see each new piece as it is posted.


You have this new yuppie group coming in that is gung ho about urban agriculture … but the movement wasn’t about urban agriculture, it was about survival, taking back our communities,” she says. “Now you have people coming into gardens that have established histories, that were built on the backs of people who made it safe for you to come in, and you’re gonna talk about urban agriculture? You cannot leave out … the history and the legacy of the elders who were there long before so you can do whatever you wanna do.
6

Some papercraft designs for teardrop shaped grist types. The blank one is so you can color your own if you wish.

Some notes: the skinny brightly colored lines at the middle should be cut along one side as used as very narrow flaps to make the base gently curved. For the curved segments, attaching the top flap of that segment and then working downward gives cleaner results.

Gusher shaped grist print-outs

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Elizabeth Warren says what she really thinks of Keystone XL

Are Humans an Outbreak?

Grist Magazine interviewed science writer David Quammen about his new book Spillover. The overall message of this great interview is that we had better prepare for the worst because animal viruses that spillover to humans (think Ebola, AIDS, SARS, avian flu) can’t stop, won’t stop. But here’s where the interview kicked it into high gear: 

Grist: In the last section of the book, you arrive at the unavoidable question: Are we ourselves an outbreak, like a disease?

David Quammen: As I say in the book, outbreaks are an ecological phenomenon. They’re not unnatural in that sense. Certain kinds of species have a propensity for these huge rises followed by these crashes. And so what I call The Analogy essentially is a question that I have put to some of the experts, including the people who study outbreaks in tent caterpillars and forest Lepidoptera: Is it reasonable to think of us humans as an outbreak population? And generally they say yes.

There has never been any large-bodied vertebrate before us on this planet that was anywhere near as abundant. There have never been 7 billion apes of any species. There have never been 7 billion water buffalo or deer of any species. There has never been anything like what we are now. And in that sense we’re an outbreak population … and the thing about outbreaks is, they end.

Ummm….

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Have you seen these orphaned baby fruit bats? Look at them, with their tiny baby bat blankets and their tiny baby bat bottles! Just look at them being so insanely cute I can’t even take it!

I was planning on going down to Australia and batnapping them immediately, but Grist says the Australian Bat Clinic, where they live, could really use some donations and volunteers, so maybe a less felonious trip is in order.

[thanks to my brother for the tip!]