I’d chase the moon
until the end of eternity
if it meant
the stars in your eyes
would cheer me on.
—  E. Grin

Disney Animators Study Their Reflections in Mirrors to Draw Classic Characters’ Facial Expressions

For decades, professional animators have relied on mirrors and their own facial expressions to be able to produce the dynamic, expressive characters that audiences know and love. Using themselves as models, the artists leer, grin, and grimace at their own reflections so that they can recreate the right nuances of each look on paper.

In this charming set of photos, legendary animators from the 1940s to the 1960s can be seen making hilarious faces at themselves as they sketch beloved characters like Bugs Bunny, Donald Duck, and Fred Flintstone. Working in famed studios like Walt Disney Production, Warner Bros, and Hanna-Barbera Productions, these artists brought to life many of the creations that defined the golden age of American animation, from Tom and Jerry to Lady and the Tramp.


Of all the Totoros we’ve seen over the years, this awesomely detailed manic Totoro is almost certainly the creepiest. With a grin that would impress the Cheshire Cat and billowing fur that suggests he might be a ghost, this stunning My Neighbor Totoro-themed diorama was recently on display at the 2015 Amazing Japan Model Expo in Osaka, Japan.

This annual event draws fantastically skilled and creative model-makers and sculptors from across Japan to come exhibit their best creations together. Head over to RocketNews24 to check out more of the fantastic models that were shown at this years Amazing Japan Model Expo.

Photos by @T_SONOYAMA, @na_ta_s, and Kinisoku respectively.

[via RocketNews24 and iNotOtaku]

What’s the worst part?“ She asks, gazing over at me.

I take my eyes off my phone as I reply, “The worst part?”

“About heartbreak,” She says, “what’s the worst part about it?”

“Other than the crippling feeling of the way your body aches with every step,” I start, “I think it’s knowing you’ll never be the same.

—  E. Grin, it’s knowing you’ll never be the same