green-later

Neutron Stars Are Weird!

There, we came right out and said it. They can’t help it; it’s just what happens when you have a star that’s heavier than our sun but as small as a city. Neutron stars give us access to crazy conditions that we can’t study directly on Earth.

Here are five facts about neutron stars that show sometimes they are stranger than science fiction!

1. Neutron stars start their lives with a bang

When a star bigger and more massive than our sun runs out of fuel at the end of its life, its core collapses while the outer layers are blown off in a supernova explosion. What is left behind depends on the mass of the original star. If it’s roughly 7 to 19 times the mass of our sun, we are left with a neutron star. If it started with more than 20 times the mass of our sun, it becomes a black hole.

2. Neutron stars contain the densest material that we can directly observe

While neutron stars’ dark cousins, black holes, might get all the attention, neutron stars are actually the densest material that we can directly observe. Black holes are hidden by their event horizon, so we can’t see what’s going on inside. However, neutron stars don’t have such shielding. To get an idea of how dense they are, one sugar cube of neutron star material would weigh about 1 trillion kilograms (or 1 billion tons) on Earth—about as much as a mountain. That is what happens when you cram a star with up to twice the mass of our sun into a sphere the diameter of a city.

3. Neutron stars can spin as fast as blender blades

Some neutron stars, called pulsars, emit streams of light that we see as flashes because the beams of light sweep in and out of our vision as the star rotates. The fastest known pulsar, named PSR J1748-2446ad, spins 43,000 times every minute. That’s twice as fast as the typical household blender! Over weeks, months or longer, pulsars pulse with more accuracy than an atomic clock, which excites astronomers about the possible applications of measuring the timing of these pulses.

4. Neutron stars are the strongest known magnets

Like many objects in space, including Earth, neutron stars have a magnetic field. While all known neutron stars have magnetic fields billions and trillions of times stronger than Earth’s, a type of neutron star known as a magnetar can have a magnetic field another thousand times stronger. These intense magnetic forces can cause starquakes on the surface of a magnetar, rupturing the star’s crust and producing brilliant flashes of gamma rays so powerful that they have been known to travel thousands of light-years across our Milky Way galaxy, causing measurable changes to Earth’s upper atmosphere.

5. Neutron stars’ pulses were originally thought to be possible alien signals

Beep. Beep. Beep. The discovery of pulsars began with a mystery in 1967 when astronomers picked up very regular radio flashes but couldn’t figure out what was causing them. The early researchers toyed briefly with the idea that it could be a signal from an alien civilization, an explanation that was discarded but lingered in their nickname for the original object—LGM-1, a nod to the “little green men” (it was later renamed PSR B1919+21). Of course, now scientists understand that pulsars are spinning neutron stars sending out light across a broad range of wavelengths that we detect as very regular pulses – but the first detections threw observers for a loop.

The Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) payload that is soon heading to the International Space Station will give astronomers more insight into neutron stars—helping us determine what is under the surface. Also, onboard NICER, the Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) experiment will test the use of pulsars as navigation beacons in space.

Want to learn even more about Neutron Stars? Watch this…

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

So one day there’s this small piece of green Tarmac (bear with) that walks into his local bar, all is going well as usual, but then this great big piece of grey Tarmac walks in and changes the atmosphere. Nothing comes of it and slowly the bar goes back to normal, the grey Tarmac becomes a regular for a week but one night drinks too much, he starts picking arguments and is on the verge of being barred, upon his warning he calms down and fumes to himself.

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alec had to admit, when magnus casually mentioned that alec should show him a few things about archery on a sunny tuesday morning in the target range of the institute, alec had felt a kind of smug pride burn in his chest. the sunlight had been filtering through the windows, catching bits of dust and catching at the tips of magnus’s spiked up hair and he looked… breathtaking. but more than that there was this amused kind of darkness around his eyes as he said it so casually, while alec still had an arrow nocked.

“what do you say?” magnus had finished with, tipping his head to the side slightly, leaning against one of the pillars. and alec was pretty sure his grin was blinding as he eagerly responded.

“i’d love to.”

maybe if he hadn’t been so smug he would have seen the mirth twinkling in magnus’s eyes but instead his pride eclipsed him and he turned back to the target, letting his arrow fly. it hit dead center and at that moment he felt entirely invincible if he was honest with himself.

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Gravity Falls AU

Rather than being twins, Lance and Pidge are best friends who wind up at the Mystery Shack because of Pidge. She’s been searching for cryptids her whole life, and she has a pen pal by the name of Hunk who is constantly sharing all of these stories about his home town and the weird things that go on there. So, directly after graduating high school, the two of them set out to Altea (Gravity Falls).

Pidge here is, obviously, taking the place of Dipper. She’s searching for the abnormal, the mysterious, wants to prove to Lance that things like Bigfoot and aliens do exist. Her older brother Matt went missing when she was just a kid, and she’s convinced something paranormal took him and needs to prove it. He was 16 when he disappeared, she was 8, and he vanished while on his yearly camping trip with some friends in Altea. 

Lance becomes Mabel, obsessed with knitting and boys (and girls) and, even though he is skeptical about all things supernatural (except ghosts, ghosts are totally real), he cares about Pidge a lot and he knows she wants to find Matt. He calls her the little sister he wanted instead of the ones he got (she’s a year younger than him, skipped a grade in middle school, and he stood up for her against a bunch of bullies. They’ve been joined at the hip since). 

Hunk, Pidge’s pen pal in this au, is Soos. He works for the Mystery Shack, so he gets a first hand look at everything that goes on in the woods surrounding the area. He has also just graduated high school and is saving money, taking a skip year before going to college for engineering, and his friend Shiro offered him the job. 

Shiro is replacing Grunkle Stan. Shiro is 25, and he moved up to Oregon after a camping incident that happened when he was just 16 (shocker, same one that made Matt vanish). He’s agreed to take Pidge and Lance in when they get there, seeing as he has an extra room upstairs, so long as they pitch in every now and then. If Hunk trusts them, so does he, but Hunk failed to mention that Pidge was Matt’s sister, so the moment Shiro lays eyes on Pidge he almost passes out, she looks so much like Matt. Pidge doesn’t recognize Shiro, having only met him twice, before he had scars and muscles and a prosthetic (which he got from a nasty encounter with a certain shapeshifter), so he keeps quiet about her missing brother. 

The only other person who works at the Mystery Shack is Keith, taking on the role of Wendy. He has a rocky relationship with his father and brothers and spends most of his time working. He’s fairly chill, irked but amused by Lance’s cheerfulness and Pidge’s enthusiasm. 

Couple of other, minor things:

- Kaltenecker instead of Waddles

- Haggar instead of Bill (lets be honest, she’s the real villain of Voltron)

- Coran as McGucket; his mind was fried a long time ago, but he’s still an incredibly brilliant scientist and inventor, and anyone who sits down and talks to him realizes that he’s actually kind of a genius. 

- There wasn’t really a character that fit Allura super well, so we’ll say she replaces Lazy Susan and owns the diner. She flirts with Shiro every single time he comes in, and can kick ass when necessary. Her father was the former mayor.

- Shiro, unlike Grunkle Stan, isn’t scroogey about his money for greed reasons. He needs it to fund his underground research into what happened to Matt. Of course, he knows; Matt was sucked into a portal directly on top of the property where Shiro built the Mystery Shack. But he needs to figure out how to get him back. 

- Zarkon is a bit of a lesser evil; he’s the shapeshifter that Lance and Pidge find in the bunker under the Shack, and he’s obsessed with getting the journal back. 

- Among the things they run into: Arusians (replacing the gnomes, and slightly less hostile), Luxia, a mermaid stuck in the local pool, a bunch of Galra who attempt to teach Lance about manliness (Manotaurs; cue I’ll Make a Man Out of You sequence with Thace and Ulaz), Nyma, a video game that tries to kill Lance (Giffany), and Balmerans, who they find trapped in the underground sap whatnot after Kaltenecker gets stolen by a pterodactyl (cows belong outdoors, Lance). 

- Keith is a champion at climbing trees, skinning things, and all around being a badass. Lance is more than a little infatuated. 

- Voltron is created when all five of Matt’s journals are brought together, forming a spell that has the ability to defeat Haggar, who drove Matt insane during the camping trip. 

- Pidge constantly thinks the handwriting in the journals looks familiar, but she can’t quite place why.

- Matt started the journals when he and Shiro were 12, when they first started going camping in Altea with their parents, and continued them all up until he was 16, when Haggar started harassing him. He hid four of them around the town, paranoid that someone was going to find them, and entrusted the last one to Shiro before he was swallowed up by the portal. Each of them is marked by a different color on the “V” symbol; the one Shiro has is black, and the one Pidge finds is green. Lance later finds a blue one hidden behind the arcade.

- Sendak becomes Gideon, and he’s found the yellow one. When he’s defeated, Shiro takes that one for himself. 

- Pidge’s symbol remains the pine tree, seeing as she is a nature spirit. Lance, instead of being a shooting star, is a wave, Shiro a bolt of lightning, Keith a flame, and Hunk a mountain. Allura is a flower (shaped suspiciously like a juniberry) and Coran is a wrench. Matt, when he comes back, is the Voltron “V”

- If none of this convinces you: 

Look at this cute doodle by @artsyfalafel of Pidge in Dipper wear and Lance in a mermaid sweater

I thought I’d take a moment to talk about one of my favorite minor rogues in the Batman canon.  It’s not Clock King, it’s not Condiment King, it’s not even Killer Moth…

This is A.S. Scarlet, AKA The Bookworm, a character that was introduced in the 1966 Adam West TV series.  The creators came up with the idea for him in honor of National Reading week, so no points for guessing what his shtick is.  But it’s the details that makes me really love him.

First of all, the costume and gadgets.  I love this costume so much—it hits the sweet spot between goofy and kind of awesome.  The brown pleather jacket is meant to echo “rare old book bindings” (because books are bound with leather…?) and while it looks more than a bit uncomfortable (it seriously creaks whenever he moves!), the tailoring on it is great.  Plus it manages to look rather dapper.

The reading lamp on the fedora is pretty neat, but what I really love are the glasses.  When he turns a knob on the side of the left frame, it opens a radio frequency that allows him to communicate with his henchmen. A few years later, the Green Hornet TV show would come up with a similar device, but I love the fact that a one-off Batman villain came up with it first.

Second of all, the henchmen themselves.  Typically the henchmen on the ‘66 show, even moreso than in modern Batman media, were big dumb galoots who had to be led around by their nose to obvious answers by their bosses.  But these guys didn’t really fit that stereotype.  Yeah, they were crappy fighters and got their butts handed to them by Batman easily, but they were miles more intelligent than your average goons. They were articulate, kind of snobby, and always thinking on the same wavelength as their boss.  That, and they were efficient—every scheme they wanted to pull went off without a hitch. Plus they’ve got some awesome codenames (Pressman, Typesetter, and my favorite, Printer’s Devil).

And of course, there was the moll—Lydia Limpet (Francine York).  Most of the time the ‘66 molls were there just to be empty-headed eye-candy, but not this girl.  Not only does she have some genuinely adorable chemistry with Bookworm—

(I ship these two like freaking FedEx.)

–but she is also darn intelligent in her own right. When she’s taken into the Batcave and hypnotized to try to weasel out her boss’s ultimate plan, she immediately twigs to the fact that the Dynamic Duo know more than they should and feeds them false information.  She also tricks Robin into gassing himself into unconsciousness.  All while literally having her hands tied.  She also has quite a bit in common with Bookworm, sharing his love of literature.  And then at the end, while most molls try to weasel their way out by pleading with Batman and claiming they were just innocent girls who tangled with the wrong crowd, Lydia accepts her fate and allows herself to be arrested.  She’s completely unapologetic about the entire scheme, and I love that about her.

And third of all, the character of the Bookworm himself.  He’s played by one of the great character actors, Roddy McDowall—

(whom you might know better as this little scamp)

–who makes Bookworm into much more than a one-note baddie.  He’s intelligent, certainly, with high standards and an eidetic memory; and he’s also very theatrical and cheerfully practically in a Riddler sort of way.  But he’s also freaking scary.  Most of the time, he has a very genteel, calm demeanor with this constant smile of slight “you poor simple fools”-style amusement on his face.  But when things don’t go his way, or when someone even says a wrong thing, he completely flips his gourd.  In the beginning of his two-parter, Lydia asks him why, with his brain and enthusiasm, he hasn’t written his own book.  And he blows up at her, admitting that for all his brilliance he doesn’t actually have any originality, resorting to “stolen plots” from other books, and accuses her of insulting him further.  He then picks up the heaviest book in his lair and attempts to bash her brains in with it…all over an honest mistake.  

Of course, he’s back in perfect control within minutes, but for the rest of the episode you’re on edge every time he so much as snaps at anyone.  And it’s not the only time he flies off the handle like that, either—after Batman and Robin escape one of his deathtraps, he has another brief freakout before getting back to business.  He’s a fascinating character to watch and played by a fantastic actor to boot.

The two-part 1966 episode he’s in is a wild ride from start to finish, including a possible assassination attempt, the first window cameo ever, and some truly outrageous and convoluted deathtraps (appropriate for a rogue who “like any struggling novelist, overcomplicates the plot!”).  One of which involves a giant cookbook.  I am not making that up.  All the expected ‘60s weird is there, but it’s still a lot of fun.

Unfortunately, that was the only appearance he made in Batman media for a long time.  McDowall wanted to come back for another two-parter, but his busy schedule got in the way.  He didn’t show up again until a 1989 Huntress arc that gave him a new grim ‘n’ gritty backstory.

“A victim of child abuse, his mother would lock him in a closet while she worked on puzzles. (Alexander) Wyvern once started a fire in the closet in a desperate attempt to get his mother to release him – only to wind up badly burned and, after he got his mother’s attention, badly beaten. Psychologically damaged, the boy grew into a serial killer.  Though the violent character bore little resemblance to the literature-obsessed felon of the 1960s, this version did still leave Riddler-style clues for the police to hunt him down.  Bookworm ultimately met his demise when he set a deadly trap for the Huntress. Huntress dressed as his mother, frightening him into running away and tripping his own contraption, killing him.”

(From the Batman wiki)

It was lame, and we don’t talk about it anymore.

He made a few cameos in Deathstroke the Terminators and Teen Titans comics in the 90s, as well as a itty bitty nonspeaking appearance in Batman: The Brave and the Bold.

But in 2013 he made a glorious debut to comics in 2013 in the Batman ’66 line, setting new deathtraps and dropping new literary hints. In one of his best appearances, he sets himself up as an adversary to Batgirl, which is just perfect.  Who better to oppose Barbara Gordon, a librarian, than a book-themed supervillain?

(Yes, that is a giant bug demon.  Long story.)

And in 2014 he reappeared in Gotham Academy, this time as the school’s English and theater professor, which is even more perfect.

He’s a good teacher, if strict and a bit overdramatic.  And let’s be honest, what isn’t cool about having an ex-supervillain as a professor?

Also, this scene. This scene is awesome.

Yes, that is Egghead as played by Vincent Price.  Gotham Academy is just the best.

TL;DR, the Bookworm is an awesome, oft-overlooked Batman baddie whom I highly recommend every fan check out.  You won’t regret it!

Here’s a link to an episode of the Batcave Podcast discussing his ’66 two-parter: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2P3k0o_-Zvk

(All images courtesy of Google Stock.)

One of my majors is english, so I do a lot of reading. Having to read an entire novel each week is rough, but it really helped me refine my annotating methods. Here is how I annotate fiction and nonfiction books! 

FICTION

1. MAKE USE OF THE BLANK PAGES IN THE FRONT OF THE BOOK 

I’m someone who has a lot of trouble with keeping track of characters, especially if there are a lot of them. To remedy this, I use one of the blank pages in the front of the book to make a list of each of the characters, and sometimes I’ll write something about them so I can place a name to a character. Here’s a quick example: 

2. USE HIGHLIGHTERS AND ASSIGN MEANING TO THE COLORS

If you aren’t someone who likes to actually write in the book, you can obviously use different colored post-its for this instead. I typically use three different colors when highlighting, and this is what the colors mean for me:

Pink - Character introductions: I use pink to highlight any time a character is introduced for the first time. You will often be asked to write about characters’ personalities, so this makes it easier to find descriptions of characters later. 

Green - Important plot points: I use green to highlight any important things that happen that I think I’ll need to look back at. 

Yellow - quotes: I use yellow for important quotes, or anything that is important but doesn’t fit any other category. 

Extra - Purple: After you finish reading a book, your teacher will usually point out important passages too. When this happens, I use purple to highlight those sections to denote that my professor found them important, because this probably means they’re worth talking about in an essay. 

3. WRITE A SUMMARY AT THE END OF EACH CHAPTER

To make sure you really understood what you just read, it is a good idea to write down a brief summary on the last page of the chapter. This helps with remembering what you read, and it also makes it much easier to go back and find events in the plot that you want to talk about.

4. POST-ITS FOR ESSAY IDEAS

I’ve pretty much had to write an essay on virtually every book I’ve had to read in both high school and college, so I’ve made a habit of using post it notes to bookmark pages with content that would be helpful in making arguments in an essay. Make a short note on the post it so you remember what point you were planning on making with that passage. *This is especially helpful for timed essays during which you’re allowed to use the book as a resource. That way, you can have essentially your entire argument planned out ahead of time. 

NONFICTION 

I use similar methods when annotating nonfiction, but instead of paying attention to plot points, I try to focus on main arguments and ideas. 

1. USE A BLANK PAGE FOR SUMMARIZING

Like with fiction, I like to use a blank page at the front of the book to summarize different sections of the book. This makes it easy to remember all the main ideas without having to flip back through the entire book.

2. HIGHLIGHTING AND WRITING

When I read nonfiction, I care much less about color-coding my annotations. I typically just use whatever I have around me at the time. What really matters about nonfiction is making sure you really understand the content, so I write down summaries in the margins on nearly every other page. 

As you can see, there’s a lot of different colors going on. They mean nothing. Honestly, my yellow highlighter was just going dead so I was going back and forth between that and my purple one. The red pen was the one I was using during my initial read-through, and the second time I read these pages, I just happened to have a blue pen, so don’t worry about the colors.

Anyway, what is really important about this is my short summaries in the margins. Doing this not only helps you dismantle the arguments being made, but it also forces you to become an active reader. 

3. ACTIVE READING

Like i just mentioned, engaging with the book by writing summaries frequently makes you an active reader. It is difficult to get anything out of a book if you aren’t actively engaging with the material, especially if it’s nonfiction. To fully understand the ideas being presented in the book, you need to find a way to actively engage with it. You can do this by using my ‘writing summaries in the margins’ method, or you can do whatever it is that makes you really focus on the content of the book. Anyone can zone out and look at words on a page, but if you want that A, you need to really dive into the book! 

I missed the first day of the campaign so DM wanted to introduce my character( Lizardfolk Beast Rider) to the party. (dragonborn archer, oni fighter, and half-orc paladin) this was my intro.
DM: You see out the window(speaking to the rest of the party) 3 men approaching what appears to be a giant lizard on a horse what do you Do?
Oni: I JUMP OUT THE WINDOW
DM:Roll acrobatics
Oni: rolls a 6 takes 1 damage.
Rest of party takes the stairs.
Snek: Intimidate the thieves (doesn’t speak common) rolls a 25
DM: They are scared shitless but don’t understand you.
Snek: Charge attack a thief gets max damage.
DM: You impale one on your lance. The other 2 now shit themselves, but they still attack you.
Horc: Roll to sense motive.
Snek Ooc: THEY ARE ATTACKING ME WHAT DO YOU THINK THEIR MOTIVE IS.
Snek IC: I do not like Green man.

Green Man would later knock himself out in a critical fail and I would refuse to give him back his weapon til he told me in game that he did it himself.

perc’ahlia lends itself really well to the legend of Tam Lin

  • Young woman is warned by everyone, particularly her noble father, not to go into the dangerous forest
    • “Fuck you,” sayeth she, and go in
  • “What are you doing in my forest?” says a strange man, here with white hair and nerd glasses
    • “You must be that dangerous Tam Lin Percival I’ve heard so much about,” sayeth she. “beloved of a Faerie Queen Lord for your quick wit and clever hands, and known to use the same to draw beautiful maidens to hell.”
    • “I mean it’s more like I sold my sou- um. ah. um.“
    • “Yes?” sayeth she, already stripped to her green garters.
  • Some time later, the not-maiden is found to be pregnant. “Is it one of my knights?” demands her father. “They’ll wed you, if so.” (”Is it one of his fucking knights?” demands her brother, in this version. “I’ll kill them, if so.”)
    • “No, it’s my own true love, Tam Lin Percival,” says Vex, and dramatically runs off b/c she’s got some rescuing to do at a crossroads on midnight of All Hallows Eve
      • “This is a horrible idea,” mutters Vax, stealthing after her.
  • the lords and ladies of the court ride past in ranks, horses black as coal and white as marble, all snorting gun smoke in the fine winter air. Vex leaps forth and seizes Percy down, and holds him per the Faeries’ deal - he turns into a striking snake, slippery and shade, and she holds him. He turns into a screaming raven, wild as death, and she holds him. He turns into a cloud of smoke, burning hot and loose in her grasp - and she holds him, holds him tight, until the smoke fades and he settles back into a naked man, pale and trembling in her arms.
    • “Told you I could do it,” pants the triumphant, the bargain-winner.
    • “Fuck you,” says Orthax.
    • “Fuck off,” say Percy and Vex and Vax simultaneously, and they all move away from the twins’ shitty father and live happily ever after the end.
Hey Voltron Fans!

Feeling lost after marathoning Voltron and don’t know what to now do with your life? 

Feeling the need for more tv about fun space families?

Wanna see more of Josh Keaton as a Space Dad™?

May I present:

YOU GET NOT ONE:

BUT TWO

SPACE DADS

YOU GET: 

ANGRY SPACE BUNNY

YOU GET

ANGEL BABY SWEETHEART AI

YOU GET FANTASTIC STORIES AND WONDERFUL CHARACTER AND RELATIONSHIP DEVELOPMENT HEADED BY JIM KRIEG (creator Spooksville, writer on multiple DC animated products) AND GIANCARLO VOLPE (director on ATLA and Star Wars: The Clone Wars)*

YOU GET GORGEOUS ANIMATION

LOOK

AT

THIS!!!

“But Annica,” you say, “I don’t know anything about the Green Lantern mythos or DC. I won’t understand any of it!”

You won’t need to know the background! The story accessible and easy for anyone who doesn’t have background on Green Lantern. You might miss a few easter eggs within the series, but plot and character wise, you won’t be left out of the loop.

“But I’m not a huge fan of 3D animation on tv shows” you say.

Once upon a time, I was very much in you position, and I will admit, at the beginning, it may seem a big jarring, but honestly the animation fits very well with the series and it grows to be absolutely gorgeous and you’ll soon stop noticing the initial difference that was throwing you off. 

“But Hal Jordan is a jerk!”

Oooooooooh yes he is. Normally. Believe you me I am aware. Normally at least - however this version of Hal Jordan, while at times cocky, has wonderful development and becomes a very likeable character. All the characters are written in ways that, even if you don’t like them, you will sympathise with them at points (hell even some of the villains).

So basically what I’m trying to say is

Go watch Green Lantern: The Animated Series

(*you may also get tears. Just saying it now so you don’t hate on me later)

Crazy Critter of Bald Mountain

On November 14th, 1974, numerous eyewitnesses claimed to see a fiery object plummet to Earth approximately five miles away from Bald Mountain in Lewis County, Washington.

Three days after this event, Seattle grocer Earnest Smith was deer hunting in the area when he spotted a strange creature that was unlike anything he had ever seen before. He described it to Jim Brandon of “Weird America” as horse-sized, covered with scales and standing on four rubbery legs with suckers like octopus’s tentacles. Its head was football-shaped with an antenna sticking up, and it gave off a green, iridescent light.

Days later, Roger Ramsbaugh and his wife were driving along State Route 7- a nearly 60-mile stretch of road between Morton and Tacoma- on a fog shrouded evening, when they suddenly noticed a dull green glow near the side of the road. When they slowed down to investigate, they saw that very same creature standing there, and they presumably sped off out of fear.

These reports soon reached the local paper, who dubbed it the Crazy Critter of Bald Mountain. Eventually, William H. Wiester the Lewis County sheriff began an investigation. Shortly after, he was visited by United States Air Force and NASA officials and instructed not to continue his investigations. The sheriff’s own team of county officials was replaced by heavily armed agents wearing uniforms with no insignia. As soon as they swooped in, no new information regarding the Crazy Critter was revealed, and no more sightings have been reported ever since.

2

Art on the new wall at Disney TV Animation Studios! Photos courtesy of @kritterart and @banannerbread via Instagram.

I wonder why they have Rapunzel in green on the wall (not that I mind). Is it because it matches Pascal? Is the green dress significant later? (I hope the green dress is significant later!)

Barista Job Spell jar

This is a jar I made for myself in pursuit of a long term job/career at a coffee shop. Please note, I have a lot of experience in barista work so this spell was made in attempt to find a perfect job for myself.

Bottom is coffee grounds for Energy and Confidence Middle is Cocoa, for prosperity and money

Top is Cinnamon for wealth and wisdom, and sugar for positive attention

I sprinkled in just a little more coffee and sealed it. I wrote sigils on a green candle (I also later sealed it with a white candle I blessed during the eclipse, just for a good extra kick!) and used it to seal everything into place. Wear it around while you job hunt and charge it as needed! I also loved stashing it under my clothes while I interviewed. One good thing I also found is that when I was getting anxious, I held it to my lips and pictured what my goal job would be like, to give the jar good thoughts and energy. It really helped calm me down and get back to it!

My personal results were so good, I got what I could only describe as a DREAM job. Please feel free to make your own and change it for your desired job and please let me know!