green witchcraft

The Domestic Garden Witch: Making Pets Happy

So maybe you’re a college witch with limited space and money, limited to the one window in your dorm. Or, maybe you’re a witch without extensive backyard space who wants to start up a magical garden. Perhaps you’re a kitchen witch who wants the freshest herbs right at her fingertips.

For many witches, having a garden seems to be a bit of a no-brainer. After all, plants and magic go hand-in-hand. Plus, when thinking of a witch, it’s hard not to think of a cottage in the woods with a little vegetable garden out front. Unfortunately for the majority of us, our cottage in the woods is a tiny flat, and our garden out front is a windowsill with limited space.

This is when it comes time to embrace your craftiness and bring your garden indoors! Not only does it place your garden in a convenient location, it also allows you to freshen the air, recycle what would otherwise harm the earth, and embrace your witchy green thumb!

Gardening for Your Familiar

This past weekend, I went to one of my coven sisters’ place to run a game of Dungeons and Dragons. This in itself isn’t that unusual - I usually play about a game a week, and every other week is held at her place. However, she is definitely a witch who spends plenty of time both in the garden and in the kitchen! A fellow animal lover, with three cats and a couple of dogs, it’s always enjoyable to visit. What surprised me, though was an addition to her home’s normal features: a little garden close to the ground meant for her cats!

Whether a college witch or a witch who’d been practicing for a long time, it’s fair to say that many of us - dare I say that perhaps most of us - have dogs, cats, or some other kind of pet. And while there are plenty of spells out there for familiars and pets, it’s rare that I see spells focusing on gardens for them. So of course, my sister’s garden is featured this week, because it is absolutely brilliant!

A simple project, done in the same way you would any container garden, consider growing plants that your furry friends can safely consume. Where the magic comes in is the intent with which you grow your plants and with which you pot them. The example above makes use of cat grass, catnip, mint (which the kitties love to rub up against), cilantro, and parsley.

But let’s take it a step further, as there are plenty of other animals out there!

Aquatic Gardens: Just like with terrestrial pets and plants, live plants can be added to an aquarium with care. Not only do they breathe new life into your fishes’ home, but they help oxygenate the water and depending on the species of plant and fish in the environment, could provide a food source. Sometimes the plant itself is the pet, as in the case of marimo moss balls!

Terrarium Gardens: In the past, I’ve mentioned bottled gardens and terrarium gardens. Whether reptile or amphibian, plants can help provide a more natural surface for climbing, can provide a food source for herbivorous friends, and - as before - help bring more life to the terrarium!

Formicarium Gardens?: Admittedly, not everyone has a colony of ants as a domestic pet. But as with any animal, ants require care and maintenance, and a proper formicarium usually has a larger area for foraging. Though the ants will be healthy with a steady supply of feeder insects and sugars, adding plants will not only make the “outworld” a more aesthetically pleasing environment, but a more diverse one for the colony as well. In addition, ants have been known to tend to plants, harvesting sap and nectars while also keeping the plant nourished and maintained. Take it a step further by adding pitcher plants - a plant that could easily be a pet itself - which not only help control the colony population, but also promote a mutual relationship with ants (the plant offers nectar to the ants from its inactive pitchers, and while it does “eat” ants, the ants will still take care of the pitcher for the sake of the nectar).

Bringing it Outside: Some of us count horses and other outdoor animals as pets. The same principle applies - set aside a box garden specifically to help nourish your friends and bring some joy to the stable. Similarly, if you don’t have any pets, you could set up a garden to encourage wildlife. It’s not uncommon to see beautiful flower gardens for hummingbirds, fruit trees and berry bushes to encourage wild birds to visit, and gardens set off to the side specifically for deer.

What This Brings to a Witch

Part of being a witch or of being pagan is nurturing a relationship with nature. There are many ways of doing this, from adopting an organic lifestyle to assisting in conservation efforts, to even learning how to forage and to recognize various plants. But it goes without saying that pets, plants, and animals can all do much to help us learn about our role in the world. They teach us how to be ourselves, how to live in the moment. Even the ants in a formicarium can teach us about how to naturally be efficient and productive.

This in itself is magical. It’s a natural spell that is meant to enliven the spirit and while it does do quite a bit to make the animals in our lives happy and healthy (even more so when planted and grown with intent), it also turns around and gives us the very same blessing.

Grow your garden, and tend to it and your animal friends with love, and they will teach you far more than you may realize!

May all your harvests be bountiful! )O( 

I want the job, I’m going to get the job.


🔮 coffee grounds- for feeling energized and standing out

🔮 lavender- to ease my anxiety

🔮 rose petals- for confidence and to remind myself that I am a badass witch and I got this!

🔮 sunflower seeds- because sunflowers make me happy and calm

🔮 clear quartz- for calmness

🔮 citrine- to show that I am creative and the right person for the job

🔮 rose quartz- for positivity

🔮 a bay leaf- I can not burn them in my apartment, so instead I wrote “job at _____” and repeated “I want the job, I’m going to get the job” as I crumpled the leaf up and placed it in the jar

🔮 cinnamon- to add that extra zing that will make the interviewer remember me

🔮 finally, I sealed off the jar with a green candle to represent money and work. I repeated “I want the job, I’m going to get the job”

Foodie Friday: Kombucha

Recipe Credit: Brothers Green Eats

Note: When preparing kombucha, you are handling a live bacteria culture in a fermentation process. Should your culture begin to look and smell questionable, do err on the side of caution so as to avoid turning your tea into vinegar or to avoid introducing outside sources of bacteria.

Yields: 2 Gallons

Ingredients:
-12 Bags Black or Green Tea
-16 cups filtered water
-1.5 cups white sugar
-Large jars (disinfected)
-Cheesecloth
-Airtight, seal-able brewing bottles
-Scoby (Symbiotic Culture of Bacteria and Yeast)
-Flavoring agent (recommended fruits, herbs, etc.)

A scoby (the mat of bacteria floating in the jar on the left side of the picture) is a live bacteria culture which breaks down and ferments sweet tea. Scobys are easy to purchase from Amazon - or, if you know somebody who brews kombucha, you can request a scoby from them, as with each fermentation process, the scoby will reproduce and add another layer. It’s recommended that between batches of kombucha, you remove the oldest layer so as to maintain fresh scoby and fresh kombucha. If your first batch does not come out perfect, do not worry! Fermentation takes practice, and with each batch, you will get the hang of it!

1) Bring 8 cups of water to a boil, and steep your tea for about 10 minutes. (You want a very strong brew)

2) Allow the tea to come to room temperature, then transfer into a large jar with the remaining water. Add the sugar and stir to completely dissolve.

3) Add your scoby with some starter kombucha (if you do not have any starter, simply add a little bit of store-bought kombucha - this will increase the acidity and prevent your scoby from dying).

4) Cover the jar with cheesecloth and place in a dark, room temperature place to ferment. (Traditionally, kombucha will be blessed just before setting it aside to ferment). Allow it to sit for 1-2 weeks.

5) After the first ferment, check the kombucha - the color of the brew should have gone from black to golden, and the scoby should appear healthy (no blue, fuzzy bread molds growing on the top layer). If desired, you can check the pH of the kombucha - the goal is 2.5 to 3.5.

6) In your bottles, add some flavoring agents. Remove your scoby from the jar, reserving some of the liquid to help keep it alive. Then fill the bottles with kombucha, leaving a little head space.

7) Allow the bottles to sit for 2-3 days, cracking the top once a day to release excess gas. The kombucha will pressurize and carbonate during this second fermentation.

8) Your kombucha is ready! Refrigerate to halt the fermentation process, and serve cold!

Cook’s Note: When handling your scoby, it’s recommended to do so with clean hands so as to avoid introducing foreign bacteria to the colony. Before handling, wash your hands with a light dish soap (non-antibacterial) or invest in a box of disposable food-safe rubber gloves. This will help prevent your scoby from going bad and will keep the flavors of your kombucha fresh.

Magical Ingredient!

Kombucha has definitely grown in popularity over the last few years, and this is definitely understandable. In addition to its fresh flavors and refreshing fizz, it is also said to have plenty of health benefits - so much so that kombucha has even been called the “elixir of life.”

Here in San Luis, commercially brewed kombucha can be found in any store which sells soda, and a few restaurants have taken to brewing their own kombuchas - a testament to the growing popularity of this delicious beverage.

While the bacteria culture itself might be considered magical (it is the core of the fermentation and carbonation process after all), the magic and history behind tea is absolutely undeniable. Today, we refer to many infusions as “tea,” but true tea is prepared by brewing the leaves of the tea tree itself (camellia sinensis). There are some variations to tea due to the ease by which it can be hybridized, which allows some diversity of flavor and strength to the tea and also allows for regions to have their own “brand” of tea leaves.

Tea drinking has its origins in Eastern Asia, around the Yunnan and Sichuan provinces of China. Here the plant is native, and around the time of the Shang Dynasty the leaves began to be brewed in hot water for medicinal purposes. The drink prepared was a concentrated, bitter infusion that helped stimulate the immune system and help keep the mind awake and focused. Later, during the Tang Dynasty, the practice of tea drinking spread to Korea, Japan, and Vietnam.

Tea drinking would eventually be brought to Europe around the 17th century by the Dutch, who further spread the practice to Germany and France. By the 18th century, tea drinking became widely fashionable in Britain. Tea in Europe was prepared differently than in Asia - the leaves would be allowed to oxidize more than was practiced in Asia, resulting in black tea instead of green or oolong.

For much of the 18th century, tea remained a luxury item in the British Empire, where it was heavily taxed - so much so that it resulted in tea smuggling and several significant historical events, not least of which included the Boston Tea Party (a response of the Tea Act of 1773, which increased the tax on tea). Later on, this desire for tea began to lead to a deficit in trade, and Britain introduced opium to China, an event that would culminate in the Opium Wars.

Desperate to break the Chinese monopoly on the tea trade, Britain began cultivating tea in India between the First and Second Opium wars. The less expensive Indian tea became widely popular, and began to overtake Chinese tea in the industry.

Today, tea is considered to be the most widely consumed beverage in the world after water, and is prepared both green and black in varying ways, from chai to kombucha, to the Star Trek favorite “tea, Earl Grey, hot.” Processing of tea leaves allows for a variety of teas, and its ability to retain aromas allows it to be given additional flavors, such as mint, vanilla, and bergamot. Furthermore, some regions have developed “tea culture” - practices, rituals, and etiquette regarding the preparation, serving, and consumption of tea.

An excellent example of tea culture was recounted to me by my boyfriend, who visited Turkey several years ago. He described being offered tea in every shop and home that he visited, in varying flavors and nearly always served in a small glass with a saucer. To turn down the tea was a faux pas, and to not be offered tea was considered offensive. So enjoyable was his experience that he has since acquired a Turkish tea set, and we occasionally enjoy teas imported from Turkey or brought to us by a friend of ours who holds dual citizenship. 

The health benefits of tea are well known, both as an antioxidant and as an alternative to coffee due to its caffeine content, which helps heighten alertness while maintaining calm in the morning.

In magick, the immediate practice which comes to mind with tea is the practice of tea leaf reading, in which loose leaf green or black tea is prepared and served. The recipient of the reading consumes all but the last few dregs of tea, leaving bits and pieces of tea leaf in the bottom of the cup, which is then swirled  and upended to create patterns on the bottom and sides. These patterns and shapes form the basis of the divination.

Because there is so much economic history behind tea, it can be used in any spells regarding money and prosperity. In addition, it can be added to spells for health, strength, courage, and alertness. Tea can also be used as a money-drawing incense.

For the kitchen witch, tea is indispensable, much like salt or sugar. It forms the basis of many tea spells, and can be used in varying ways. For instance, capturing the healing energies of the sun in sun-brewed tea is a fairly common practice. Sweetened iced tea can be served as a sweetening spell, and serving any kind of tea with intent can make irritable guests more amenable. Tea can be used in baking for the same reasons, resulting in cakes and snacks which have the same properties as long as the intent is added!

For a freebie spell, we can look at one which I use every now and again for my boyfriend, and which I had used almost daily when I was working in the culinary department for a retirement community for a resident who was particularly irritable in the morning. Brew a strong black tea in boiling water (do not stir the bag, and do not ever squeeze the last drops of liquid out of the bag), and fill it with positive intent (for me, usually love, happiness, and calm). Add milk with intent for health, and then inspire sweetness, prosperity, and happiness with honey. Serve while still warm and with a heartfelt smile. Not only does it brighten my boyfriend’s morning, but it worked wonders where the aforementioned resident was concerned.

Consider the benefits tea may bring to your practice. Do you incorporate aspects of tea culture from other parts of the world? Perhaps you’re a fan of a Southern sweet tea spell? Or perhaps you lean toward love and sweetening spells? Maybe you prefer spells prepared over the course of several days, decorating jars for kombucha with sigils and runes for health and prosperity? Regardless, this beverage is steeped in history, and in all of its forms can bring plenty of positive aspects to one’s craft!

May all your meals be blessed! )O(

Gardens of the Witches

Already starting to plan this years garden so I thought I should do a post on Witch Gardens


Moonlight Garden

A garden that blooms in the moonlight, a great place to perform night time rituals, meditations, or to just take a midnight stroll. A garden that is full of magick even after the sun sets. 

Plants to add in your moonlight garden:

  • Moonflower: (Ipomoea alba) A nocturnal relative of the morning glory. Has fragrant flowers that open at dusk and close by dawn.    
  • Evening Primrose: (Oenothera biennis) Has beautiful, scented flowers that bloom only at dusk. 
  • Night Flox: (Zaluzianskya capensis) A sweetly fragranced flower that only unfurls its pinwheeled shaped flowers after dusk. 
  • Four O’Clock: (Mirabilis jalapa) Its scented flowers bloom at around 4:00pm (hence its name) and do not close up until morning. 
  • Queen of the Night: (Epiphyllum oxypetalum) A species of cactus whose flowers only open at night. Attracts moths and bats!!!
  • Night Blooming Jessamine: (Cestrum nocturnum) Strong, sweet scented star shaped flowers that only bloom at night. Attracts moths and bats!!! All parts are toxic, do not ingest!
  • Angel’s Trumpet: (Brugmansia) Produces a strong scent on warm summer evenings. All parts are toxic, do not ingest!
  • Evening Stock: (Matthiola longipetala) Produces lots of small blossoms that produce a perfume described as a mix of vanilla, rose, spice, and cloves only after the sun sets.
  • Ever-Flowering Gladiolus: (Gladiolus tristis) Release a strong almond fragrance after dusk.  
  • Lilac: (Syringa vulgaris) Although has a perfume during the day, it is said to be a lot stronger after dark. 
  • Flowering Tobacco: (Nicotiana) Open in the late afternoon and have a fragrance that smells of jasmine. All parts are toxic if ingested!
  • Summer Snapdragon: (Angelonia angustifolia) Preferably in white, to reflect the moonlight. Has a scent apple-scented foliage. 
  • Silvermound: (Artemisia schmidtiana) Has thick foliage that will shimmer under the moonlight.
  • Jack Frost: (Brunnera macrophylla) Hdeart shaped leaves of silver and green, perfect to add more highlights of silver to your moon lit garden. 

Any plant that blooms after dark or has white, lavender, pale pink, pale yellow on it is a perfect addition to your moonlight garden. 

Things to add:

  • Stepping stones that have the phases of the moon.
  • Fairy lights
  • A place to sit
  • Candles
  • A small fountain to sing along with the insects and birds of the night
  • String charms and bells on tree branches for a soft jingling every time a gentle breeze passes. 

Herb Garden

For witches who need a more practical garden for uses of healing, tea crafting, drying, and growing plants used in their practices.

Plants to add to your herb garden:

  • Anise: Helps to ward of the evil eye, find happiness, and stimulates psychic abilities. 
  • Basil: Use for anything pertaining with love, exorcism, wealth, sympathy, and protection. Dispels confusion, fears & weakness. Drives off hostile spirits.
  • Bergamont: Corresponds with money and prosperity. Provides with protection from evil and illness, improves memory, stops interference, and promotes restful sleep.
  • Borage: Corresponds with courage and psychic powers. 
  • Cat Nip: Is sacred to the Goddess Bast. Brings forth beauty, happiness, good luck, and good spirits.
  • Chamomile: Corresponds with love, healing, and sleep. Is known to reduce stress.
  • Chervil: Brings a sense of the higher self, placing you in touch with your divine, immortal spirit.
  • Coriander: Corresponds with love, health, immortality, and protection.
  • Dill: Corresponds with money, protection, luck and lust. 
  • Lemon Balm: Corresponds with love, success, healing, and psychic/spiritual development. 
  • Marjoram: Used to cleanse, purify, and to dispel negative energy.  
  • Mint: Promotes energy, communication and vitality.
  • Oregano: Corresponds with joy, strength, vitality, and added energy 
  • Parsley: Calms and protects the home.
  • Rosemary: Protects, cleanses, purifies, and aids memory. 
  • Sage: Used for self purification and dealing with grief and loss.
  • Thyme: Attracts loyalty, affection, and the good opinion of others.

Things to add:

  • A place to dry herbs
  • A place to compost any herb scraps
  • Rocks
  • A place to leave offerings before you harvest

Bee Garden

Make yourself a sanctuary to watch bees frolic and thrive

Plants to add to your bee garden:

  • Bee balm
  • Lavender
  • Crocus
  • Snow Drop
  • Wildflowers/Any native species
  • Catmint
  • Borage
  • Anise hyssop
  • Heliotrope
  • Sunflower
  • Oregano
  • Yarrow
  • Coneflower
  • Black eyed susan
  • Asters
  • Goldenrod
  • Foxglove
  • Marigold
  • Pansies
  • Sweet peas
  • Nasturtiums

Things to add:

  • Bee houses
  • Bee waterers/bee baths
  • Bee feeders
  • A place for offerings to the bees

Some other ideas for your garden:

  • Hummingbird garden
  • Medicinal garden
  • A garden whose plants and decorations represent/correspond with your practice.
  • Butterfly Garden
  • Faerie Garden 

The options are endless! I hope this gives you some ideas for this years garden.

Happy planting!

==Moonlight Academy==

Plants that don't require much sunlight

If ur like me and live in a cramped little room that gets barely any sunlight…here’s some plants that’ll survive your light-deprived ecosystem 💚

 🌿Maidenhair Fern (and ferns in general) 

 🌿English Ivy

 🌿Chinese Evergreen

 🌿Calathea 

 🌿Dragon Tree 

 🌿Begonias 

 🌿Bromeliads (they like humidity - are great for bathrooms!) 

 🌿Snake Plant 

 🌿Cast-Iron Plant 

 🌿Mint 

 🌿Swedish Ivy 

 🌿Moss (best grown in terrariums) 

 🌿Arrowhead Vine 

🌿Mother-in-law’s Tongue (yes that’s the name of it lmao) 

 🌿Creeping Fig 

 🌿Philodendron 

 🌿Calathea 

 🌿Peperomia (they only grow like 6 inches and are super cute I love them) 

 🌿Carex Morrow 

 🌿Silver Queen

Teas for Witches: the Basics

I can talk about tea literally all day (and I have because I’ve worked in a spice and tea shop for years), and there is SO much to talk about with both health and magical benefits. Teas are made from tea leaves called camellia sinensis, with the exception of herbal teas/infusions. For this, I’m going to list magical and health benefits by type of tea.

Black Tea

Feminine * Earth * Winter * Strength * Stability * Death * Expelling Negativity * Alertness * Energy

Black tea is the most fermented and oxidized of all teas. Its tea leaves look shriveled and black. It combats heart ailments, digestive problems, high cholesterol, asthma, and breast/menstrual problems. Black tea also has a lot of caffeine (47 mg, still less than coffee) and too much of it can cause acidity issues in the stomach.  

Examples: English/Irish Breakfast Tea, Assam, Darjeeling, Lapsung Souchang, Ceylon, Earl Grey

**There is a subset of black tea called Pu-erh, a post-fermented black tea. Some consider this to be the “purest” of all teas and connect it to the aether, as it is rare and valuable.

Green Tea

Masculine * Fire * Summer * Passion * Healing * Conscious Mind * Sexual Health * Love * Energy * Progress * Magic

Green tea is slightly steamed but not fermented, which maintains its green color. It has many health benefits, such as detoxifying, reducing cholesterol and weight, boosting immunity and stamina, and reducing blood glucose. It has less caffeine than black, but still some. 

Examples: Jasmine, Sencha, Matcha, Gyokurocha, Genmaicha, Hojicha, Gunpowder, Dragonwell

Oolong Tea

Feminine * Water * Autumn * Reflection * Meditation * Wisdom * Serenity * Concentration * Romance * Friendship

I always describe Oolong as being between Green and Blacks, since it is half fermented. It can help manage weight and stress, balance blog sugar levels, remove free radicals, and promote healthy skin and bones. HOWEVER, too much can actually speed up bone degradation because it sweeps away excess calcium. And beware of its high caffeine content (I used to drink Raspberry Wulong to pull all-nighters).

Examples: Milk Oolong, Formosa, Wulongs

White Tea

Masculine * Air * Spring * Happiness * Wisdom * Moon * Purification * Protection * Clarity * Cleansing * Beginnings

White tea is a little harder to find. Either the tea leaves are plucked as immature leaves and steamed, or the leaves have not been processed (there seems to be little consensus across cultures). Some have a small amount of caffeine. It’s a great antibacterial and antioxidant, and it improves the heart, oral health, and skin. Drinking a couple cups works better than one, and you can reuse the tea leaves, granted that the second cup will brew longer.

Examples: White teas come in many flavors and are usually labeled as white tea. You may need to seek out a tea shop to find some.

Herbal Tea

Magical properties depend on which herbs are used

This tea seems to be the most popular for witches on tumblr, because it is composed of dry, unprocessed herbs, seeds, fruits, or roots, and has no caffeine (as long as the herb doesn’t!). There are many recipes online as herbals are easy to make. In general, herbal tea promotes calm, reduces cholesterol and risk of heart conditions, cancers, and diabetes. Due to its lack of actual tea leaves it has less antioxidants than other teas. Some don’t even call it a tea, but dub it Herbal Infusion.

Examples: Rooibos, most Chais, Ginseng, Chamomile, Peppermint, Spearmint, Hibiscus

**Yerba Mate is an herbal tea that is notorious for its high caffeine levels (you’ve probably seen the energy drink). It also zaps one’s appetite and can become addictive, so be careful around this tea!

As always, feel free to add/message me of any corrections, and I hope you find your cup of tea!

This one actually required a lil bit of guts to post because while this works for me, I’m just starting to branch out of the research phase of witchcraft and starting to do my own practice, but I’m still petrified of doing things “wrong.” That disclaimer aside, I’m gonna explain what I’ve been working on and experimenting with.

So I’ve been making spell jars with candles on top lately. The idea here is that the spell jar is harnessing the energy of its contents when the candle is burning. That’s my intention for it anyway, and it seems to be working quite well.

This particular one I made today for the purpose of cleansing residual energy after I’ve helped a spirit cross over. I’ve had some issues with spirits in my apartment lately so that’s the reason for this.

It contains:
💧Stream Water (for cleansing)
💧Swamp Water (for banishing)
🌱Juniper leaves + berries (for cleansing and protection against malignant forces)
🍃 Violet Leaves (protection against evil)

(Also I’m totally aware that the ingredients list in my grimoire includes sage. I just forgot to add the sage before I sealed it lol).

I tried it out and it works pretty well. After I helped this one spirit cross over, I left it burning where she was standing for a few minutes and the residual energy was lessened but not gone. I’d imagine I’d need to let it burn for longer.

Anyway this was a little insight into my current practice. Maybe it could serve as an idea for someone else, or maybe I’m about to get roasted. I don’t really know.

Either way, thanks for reading ☺️

witchcraft psa

instead of jars to bury your spells in, my i suggest the idea of peat pots planters?

not only are they biodegradable, they are useful for many different things. you can grow herbs and starter plants or use them to bury a home protection without the fear of broken glass rising to the surface, or your jar staying in the ground for a 100 years. they also come in many different sizes as well. from large to very tiny

and you can even make your own from left over toilet paper rolls for a byproduct option that lessens garbage going into landfills.

there are plenty of cheaper, earth friendlier options available to us, as witches, at our disposal. it is up to us as a whole to start making better earth friendly choices, to modernize the practice. we are not from the middle ages and tradition has nothing to do with glass jars - we have the knowledge in modern days to realize how harmful the practice of burying jars actually is, we have resources to change that as well.

Sorry for barging in on a community issue but ANYONE can be a witch!

Are you a woman who practices witchcraft? You’re a witch.
Are you a man who practices witchcraft? You’re a witch.
Are you a trans person who practices witchcraft? You’re a witch.
Are you a non-binary person who practices witchcraft?
Are you a straight person who practices witchcraft? You’re a witch.
Are you an LGBTIQ+ person who practices witchcraft? You’re a witch.

Indoor plants for the space-conscious witch

Let’s face it, some of us witches just don’t have the time/space for having a fully flourishing witchy garden, but that doesn’t mean that we can’t utilise the full benefits of nature’s plants in our own spaces! Here is a list of house friendly plants that can enhance your personal space in various ways:

Geranium: These plants can provide luck and good fortune in various different ways, depending on the colour of your flower. Choose red geraniums for vitality and invigoration, pink for love, or white for fertility.

Rose: These flowers are notorious for their properties of love and friendship, and it is possible to grow miniature roses inside, or perhaps choose another Venus-ruled plant such as the maidenhair fern for the same benefits.

Impatiens: This plant, ruled by Mercury and often known as ‘busy lizzie’, does exactly what you would think it would; encourages movement and travel in your life.

Aspidistra: Ruled by Saturn, this plant encourages tranquility and homeliness, calming fears and dispelling nightmares. Another plant which achieves the same nightmare-warding effects is the cyclamen, often used throughout history to protect against evil spirits.

Thistle: A vase of thistles is thought to restore strength and vitality to those who are feeling down or depressed and have been used to ward off thieves.

Yellow plants: Arrange two yellow or orange plants, full of the Sun’s vibrant energy in front of two mirrors so they reflect the energy into your room, dispelling evil and encouraging good. This simple flower magic can be performed with any planetary influences depending on your intention.

Sources: Natural Magic by Doreen Valiente