green mat

mary’s contact names

robert; dickhead <3

joseph: actual dickhead

damien: dames

craig: protein man (drinks green shit)

mat: the cool one

hugo: hu (e g) go

brian: the one who threw his lawnmower once

2

Outdoors ain’t really my niche.  How-some-ever, I refuse to use strangers’ pathways, even if I’ll never design as well as say, bibi, because I’M INDEPENDENT, MOM!!!!  It just feels odd.  A stroll down acnlpaths DOES give silly me ideas, though, like setting a fake little newspaper at Shari’s front door, or taking a stab at stone steps.  You judge the results. : /

A lot of people don’t believe me when I say that I’ve only been sewing for a little over 3 years. Previous to that I had only really ever sewn plushies, pajama pants or pillows during Guide Guide workshops aka I could put fabric through a machine and sew in (sort of) straight lines but not much else. I had never used a clothing pattern before, I had never used anything other than a basic straight stitch, and I had never bought fabric. October 2012 was the first time I ever sewed any garments completely from scratch and those were my Fushimi from [K] vest and coat and now this October (2015) I will be competing at the Master’s level for cosplay craftsmanship. So I figured I’d give a short rundown of how I taught myself how to sew and how I improved.

1) I watched a lot of Project Runway (the earlier seasons… Annnndreeee, where is Annnndreee?). While this didn’t help much in actual sewing, it got me familiar with a whole lot of terminology and types of fabric and outfits. Plus it also showed me where people tended to take shortcuts and when those shortcuts tended to fail. 

2) I got a very basic sewing machine and I READ THE ENTIRE USER MANUAL. I started off on a Singer Simple which was a gift from my parents (who actually bought it 2 years earlier but never gave it to me thinking I’d never use it… HA!) and I went through every single English page of that user manual. I became familiar with all the parts of my machine, how to thread it, how to change bobbins, how to clean it, how to fix jams, all the different stitch types, and I practiced sewing a bunch of random stitches on scrap pieces of fabric just to see what they looked like and how they changed when I changed different tension settings.

3) I got a basic sewing book (from like 1965… it’d probably better to get an updated/current book) that acted as a glossary of sewing terms. I had no idea what 50% of the stitches I needed to use were called so this became very useful later when I bought my first pattern.

4) I bought my first patterns and chose something fairly simple to start off with which was a lined vest (followed by an immensely more difficult jacket). I went with Simiplicity patterns after doing a lot of googling for the most new-user-friendly patterns.

5) Then I FOLLOWED THE PATTERN INSTRUCTIONS. It seems like an obvious step but even now I sometimes skip a step and then later regret it. Everything the pattern said I needed, I bought. I bought the specific types of fabric, interfacing, thread, buttons, I did not deviate from their suggestions for the first trial run. Then I read through the pattern instructions, cut out all the corresponding pieces for my size and got to work. The key was to work slowly and re-read things as I went. I also used my sewing book and google to help better explain some of the instructions that were not 100% clear to me just starting out. I also looked up youtube video tutorials on how to iron seams, sew darts, properly clip curved edges, sew button holes, and finish inside seams. Research, research, research!

6) To re-iterate: TAKE YOUR TIME. Slow and steady wins the race. It took me probably a solid 4 days to sew a very simple vest that would probably take me maybe a couple hours now but damn it was one of the cleanest looking vests I had ever sewn. I made sure not to rush anything and gave myself lots of time.

7) I kept practicing. The more I sewed, the more familiar I became with how garments were put together and where I could change things to better fit my size or how to alter things to better fit the garment I was trying to create. I experimented whenever I could on scrap fabric to see what would and would not work for stitching and ironing.

3 years later and I can now draft my own patterns and sew dozens of different types of garments with dozens of fabric types. I would attribute 90% of my learning experience to taking it slow at first and researching as I went. I didn’t allow any guesswork on the first couple of projects I worked on because how would I ever learn if I didn’t look into how something was properly done? Google, youtube, tutorial blogs (wink wink), reference books, and pattern instructions are you friends, do not take them for granted. 

Pictured at the top on the left is the first Kirishiki vest I (rush) sewed in July 2012 without following instructions and trying to do it myself. The vest on the right is from December 2012 after I decided to take my time and follow instructions and actually learn while I was sewing. You can improve 100% just by taking your time, doing some research and following the instructions.

Bonus: What I bought for my sewing starter kit

  1. A green rotary/cutting mat. They can be really expensive but I have been using my large mat for 3 years straight and it works wonders at not only protecting the surface you are working on, but giving you a nice sturdy pinning and cutting surface that is self-healing and doesn’t get destroyed by pins and exacto knives.
  2. 1 large and 1 small pair of orange handled sewing scissors.
  3. A 6" x 24" clear sewing ruler.
  4. A pack of white/blue fabric pencils.
  5. A box of standard pins, plus a pin cushion.
  6. A pack of extra bobbins.
  7. A pack of standard sewing needles for hand-sewing.
  8. A pack of standard sewing needles for my machine.
  9. An iron and mini ironing board. 

Happy sewing!

-Heather

gallowshumorous  asked:

So there is a post going around about a holo drama Jedi style? Have you seen it? Basically just a documentary group gets the greenlight to film the Jedi and the whole world goes crazy because it shows the Jedi are human and great people - basically what I would LOVE from you is basically aniObiDala trashy heap as the world watches and realizes that Anakin is doomed. :)))) honestly - any little snippets from a documentary style show thingie

“Pardon my lateness, there was an issue in the creche that required council attentio-” Mace tripped over a bump in the carpet and fell as long as he was in front of the holocrew, the Jedi giving a loud yelp of shock before grunting in pain as he actually hit the stone floor.

The frozen crew stared at the Jedi in surprise.

“…Please tell me that you weren’t already filming?” The master of the Order questioned into the floor.

“…If I tell you we weren’t, would that make you feel better?” The holocamera operator questioned, smiling nervously as the Jedi pushed himself up on his knees. Mace sent her a flat look.

“Not really.” He offered wryly before gingerly touching his nose, prodding at it with care. “Should we get on with the interview?” He looked to the journalist.

“Yes, yes of course!” She beamed, utterly delighted.

Cana fluttered over to the set up chairs and eagerly gestured to the free one. “Please Master Windu, I don’t mind the initial wait but lets get started?”

She never expected to get the green light on any of this, actual entrance to the Jedi temple, interview with Jedi knights, masters and padawans, though the latter was with the stipulation that they were off age or were accompanied by adults, something Cana understood all to well.

And the Jedi were not to have a say in what they ran, all questions were permitted but could be refused to answer.

And a Toydarian to interview them, impervious to Force suggestions.

“Now, Master Windu, many are curious about the Jedi and their lives. Lets get started on a few of the many questions the galaxy at large have.” She settled in as Windu leveled a calm look at her.

()()()

The Jedi temple was HUGE.

Cana fluttered along side Windu with the recording crew following behind them, the man himself calming explaining where they were and how many Jedi were currently in Coruscant’s temple. So far they had passed several Jedi, though Windu had pointed out that while all were dressed as Jedi, some of them were Corps members.

“Corps members?” Cana questioned.

Windu stopped, peering at her before gesturing. “Corps members are those of us who didn’t get masters or just couldn’t complete the path to become Jedi knight. There’s no shame in it but its not good to just send them out into the galaxy with nothing. So we have corps. Agricore grows food, mainly for our temples but it also provides for the local area and it also provides 50% of Coruscant’s vegetables and grains.”

“I…didn’t know that.” Cana blinked.

The Jedi feed Coruscant?

Windu shrugged. “Its not a well known fact. There is also exploration crops who’s main job is galactic exploration. The medical corps that specialize in healing Force for the good of the galaxy and then there is the educational corps. Many of our philosophers and scholars come from there.”

Cana took a moment to think over it before fluttering more into eye level of Mace Windu. “They aren’t warriors, are they?”

Cocking his head and raising a brow, Mace shrugged. “They carry sabers but…no. Their jobs are not to fighters, their jobs lay in their corps and their talents are directed in those. Healing, learning, teaching, growing or exploring.” He looked around before focusing back on the Toydarian. “Not all of us are warriors or diplomats.”

That was something to think about.

“If you want, you can observe a meditation class?” Windu suddenly offered.

“Meditation class?”

()()()

The room was brightly lit by the sun, the stones lightly colored with a few potted plants standing around. There were fifteen blue mats placed out in the room in a circle around a larger one in green and on each of the blue mat a small child sat kneeling or sitting with their legs crossed with their hands resting on their thighs.

On the green mat the teacher sat, none other then Obi-Wan Kenobi, his breathing soft and steady and his voice lulling as he guided the children to empty their minds and calm down.

It was a very tranquil feeling in the room.

This was part of Jedi life, the way they taught their young ones and stars, Cana had never thought about how young some of the Initiates were.

“…Do you often get so young children?” She whispered to Windu.

“Younger, mostly babes, some as old as six.” Windu murmured in return. “I know that some of the galaxy view us as babe stealers but we have never stolen babies from good families. The parents give them to us, hoping to one day hear about their children as Jedi knights. I was given to the temple as a baby.” He offered.

“…Good families?” Cana zeroed in on that.

The Korun shifted. “…Some parents get frightened when their children suddenly starts levitating their toys. When their cries makes windows splinter and try to…” He took a deep breath. “Tries to beat it out of them.” He nodded with his chin to Master Kenobi. “Master Kenobi is one of those babes. I can ensure an interview with him at another date if you wish?”

“…I and the galaxy would very much like that.”

cornfield gothic aesthetic, because i fucking hate cornfields and i can’t escape, there is no escape, the corn, it grows;

  • dusty barns with half-rotted roofs and vines creeping up the side, JESUS SAVES and WILLSHIRE DIARY, JOHNSON & SON PRODUCE, EVERETT FARMS in peeling paint. flowers grow through the foundations and over rusted tools.  
  • the corn rising over your head and waving in unison, the shhss of stalks, the sound of things growing.  the cornfields ripple like water, and you don’t notice any wind. 
  • the feeling of relief when it’s the off season and you’ve planted soy instead.  soy only grows up to your shins; for once, you can see what’s out there. 
  • clumps of forest in the middle of seas of corn.  the woods are dark.  you never go anywhere without a flashlight.  
  • six ‘grandpa’s cheese barns’ between waterville and dayton; all six are run by the same old man who has too many teeth when he smiles. he is not your grandfather, and his cheeses taste like wine and hot metal.  
  • ponds and streams and lakes filled up with thick green mats of algae, dotted with shining horseflies, dragonflies, tadpoles the size of your thumbnail.  algae clings to the birds and to your ankles.  you pretend not to notice the smell. 
  • crosses made out of toothpicks and matches.  your great aunt leaves them under your pillow, and you keep finding them in the fields.  
  • that back half of trail you can’t convince your horse to go down.  the last time you tried she threw you, and when you woke up on the ground, arranged neatly on the very edge of the corn, you could swear that something was holding your hand. 
  • lights in the fields at three in the morning.  ancient songs.  strange patterns.  “just old man peterson gettin’ an early start on the harvest,” you tell yourself, and go back to sleep.  
  • corn mazes every october, colored flags, clues, your flashlight held tight in your fist.  during the day you run through the maze with all your friends, trying to memorize the best way in and out.  at night you fill your pockets with salt and walk through the maze slowly, eyes on the ground, careful not to piss anything off.  
  • HELL IS REAL signs every hundred miles going down i-75.  hell is real; mrs. bennett brews it in the still behind her shed and trades it for apples the size and color of fresh hearts.  
  • the emptiness after the harvest, when the corn is gone and you’ve burned everything and the earth is black and clean underneath your feet.  safe, you tell yourself, i am safe.  
  • there is something that walks behind the cornrows.  you give him your blood and your sweat and your reverence, and you do not look him in the eye.