greek orders

Cosmos is a Greek word for the order of the universe. It is, in a way, the opposite of Chaos. It implies the deep interconnectedness of all things. It conveys awe for the intricate and subtle way in which the universe is put together.
—  Carl Sagan, Cosmos
3

Nobrow’s reprint of Pantheon: The True Story of the Egyptian Deities is almost ready to go!

For those unaware of what the book is, it’s a completely accurate, but very adult, retelling of the most important myth of Ancient Egypt: the murder of the pharaoh Osiris by his brother Set and subsequent battle for the throne between Set and his nephew Horus.

If this book is successful, Pantheon is going to become a series! I’m already doing research on a Norse and a Greek version. 

Order it from Amazon UK (out next month) or from Amazon US (out in July)!

7 Underwater Facts for World Oceans Day

Today is World Oceans Day, a global day of ocean celebration and collaboration for a better future. A healthy world ocean is critical to our survival. Together, let’s honor, help protect, and conserve the world’s oceans!

1. While the Earth’s oceans are known as five separate entities, there is really only one ocean.

2. The ocean contains upwards of 99% of the world’s biosphere, that is, the spaces and places where life exists.

Both above GIFs are from the TED-Ed Lesson How big is the ocean? - Scott Gass

Animation by 20 steps

3. Jellyfish are soft because they are 95% water and are mostly made of a translucent gel-like substance called mesoglea. With such delicate bodies, jellyfish rely on thousands of venom-containing stinging cells called cnidocytes for protection and prey capture.

From the TED-Ed Lesson How does a jellyfish sting? - Neosha S Kashef

Animation by Cinematic

4. Plastics & litter that make their way into our oceans are swiftly carried by currents, ultimately winding up in huge circulating ocean systems called gyres. The earth has five gyres that act as gathering points, but the largest of all is known as the ‘Great Pacific Garbage Patch’ and has grown so immense that the oceanic garbage patch can shift from around the size of Texas, to something the size of the United States. 

From the TED-Ed Lesson The nurdles’ quest for ocean domination - Kim Preshoff

Animation by Reflective Films

5. The 200 or so species of octopuses are mollusks belonging to the order Cephalopoda, Greek for ‘head-feet’. Those heads contain impressively large brains, with a brain to body ratio similar to that of other intelligent animals, and a complex nervous system with about as many neurons as that of a dog.

From the TED-Ed Lesson Why the octopus brain is so extraordinary - Cláudio L. Guerra

Animation by Cinematic

6. Some lucky animals are naturally endowed with bioluminescence, or the ability to create light. The firefly, the anglerfish, and a few more surprising creatures use this ability in many ways, including survival, hunting, and mating.

From the TED-Ed Lesson The brilliance of bioluminescence - Leslie Kenna

Animation by Cinematic

7. Sea turtles ultimately grow from the size of a dinner plate to that of a dinner table. In the case of the leatherback sea turtle, this can take up to a decade. Happy World Turtle Day!

From the TED-Ed Lesson The survival of the sea turtle - Scott Gass

Animation by Cinematic Sweden

Cosmos is a Greek word for the order of the universe. It is, in a way, the opposite of Chaos. It implies the deep interconnectedness of all things. It conveys awe for the intricate and subtle way in which the universe is put together.
—  Carl Sagan

“Cosmos is a Greek word for the order of the universe. It is, in a way, the opposite of Chaos. It implies the deep interconnectedness of all things. It conveys awe for the intricate and subtle way in which the universe is put together…”  ~Carl Sagan.

“Cosmos is a Greek word for the order of the universe. It is, in a way, the opposite of Chaos. It implies the deep interconnectedness of all things. It conveys awe for the intricate and subtle way in which the universe is put together.”

—-

Carl Sagan, Cosmos

—-

Graphic - Aykut Aydoğdu

5

I’m going to Ghana! I will be student teaching for half of a semester in Fetteh, a rural community in West Africa. As I hope to pursue my master’s in multicultural education this is an incredible opportunity to learn and grow as an educator. It’s also pretty expensive.

While my mom helps me with groceries when she can, I am basically on my own financially. I take out loans to cover tuition and part of rent, but also work on campus at a dining hall to pay for the rest of rent, utilities, birth control, internet, food, and my monthly loan payments.

So far I have applied to over 15 scholarships, and will be applying for more. Ultimately I need to make about $5,000 to cover my flight, immunizations, passport, and other necessary costs. Here’s how you can help this broke ed major and get something cool out of it:

Check out my Etsy and request a custom order! When I say I’ll make you anything, I mean anything. I have wine glasses, beer glasses, tumblers, coffee mugs, thrifted flannels, and tshirts all waiting to be customized to your hearts’ desire! I will be making Ghana work no matter what, but I’d really appreciate if you could keep me in mind the next time you need a gift for a friend or just want to treat yo self!

my Etsy
drinkware
clothing & accessories
prints

3

KILL HIM , KILL HIM , KILL HIM !!  screamed her rage and madness, a girl who once was pure and gentle was now an embodiment of wrath and pain. ah, how she wished to turn the time back and never meet this man. to never know the betrayal and to never know this pain. 

                    HERA  OF  GREEK MYTHOLOGY  !!   SUPPORTED BY RENATA. 

taxonomist  asked:

kiss your dad square on the lips

THIS IS THE LAST ONE I’M DOING TONIGHT

I have quite a few left in my inbox which I will get to later hopefully, but tonight we are going to end with this. This… thing, which you have requested of me.

‘Kiss’ is actually kind of difficult! Our options are either our old friend philein (to love in a friendly way, but ALSO to kiss a person?) or the awkward phrase philema didonai (to give a thing-of-love) which also includes my third-least-favourite verb, the appallingly irregular ‘to give’, so to hell with that one. Philein it is. 

After that, ‘kiss your dad’ is pretty easy:

φιλε τον σον πατερα

‘square on the lips’ would be harder, but Woodhouse has my back on this one:

φιλε τον σον πατερα ἀμφιπιπτων στομασιν.

Phile ton son patera amphipipton stomasin.

Literally: ‘Love your father, falling on both of his lips.’

the great god Pan is dead,
the greeks would whisper to one another

the children of the new era know better
the great god Pan is angry, cursing humanity
so beautifully, a concerto for one, drought, diseases
Pan lives in the polluted skies, in the earth below concret
he awaits silently, as humanity tears down the ancient gods
forgets them in the dust and evolves, burning as it grows
all the while the one god that cannot be forgotten whispers
his words turning his nature into humanity’s enemy,
his sighs melting the ices, the apocalypse is coming
when humanity will be no more he will rise
tend to his beloved wildness, free from humanity’s taint

the great god Pan wipes the slate clean,
humanity dances and burns itself to ashes, knowingly.

—  || the great god Pan

               DO  YOU  LIKE  SEVENTEEN  YEAR  OLDS  WITH  DADDY  ISSUES ?     how  about  seventeen  year  old  demigods  with  daddy  issues ?     seventeen  year  old  demigods  with  daddy  issues  that  also  glow  and  heal ?     no ?     well  neither  do  most  people !    

             still  ,     feel  free  to  like  /   reblog  this  if  you’d  be  interested  in  interacting  with  in  INDEPENDENT  PERCY  JACKSON  ORIGINAL  CHARACTER !

Anabasis, or: The Persian Expedition, or: the time a bunch of idiot Greek mercs got way too involved in Persian royal family drama

Xenophon was an aristocratic Greek from the city of Athens in the fifth century BC, a student of the philosopher Socrates, a contemporary of Plato, a historian, philosopher and major political thinker in his own right, and one time when he was an idiot twenty-something he managed to get himself involved in the dumbest piece of military adventurism in the Middle East of all time.

Later he wrote a book about it. 

It’s called Anabasis, which is Greek for ‘Upgoing’, and it is my current favourite adventure story. It is full of big personalities, political drama, people getting stressed out about crossing rivers, and stupid battles. I really wanted to share it with you all, but I can’t make everyone read the whole thing, so instead I present Book 1 of the Anabasis, chapters 1-8, abridged:


Chapter One: Prince Cyrus has a bright idea

So in the fifth century BC the Persian Empire - with its heartland in modern Iran/Iraq, and its territory stretching as far as Egypt, Turkey, India, and the Black Sea - is the biggest deal around. It’s the heart of civilisation. The Persians have the best cavalry in the world, and also invented gardening. Meanwhile Ancient Greece is basically forty cats in a sack, where the cats are city-states and the sack is ‘which city-state has the biggest dick?’

Keep reading