great translations

7

Favorite relationships: Isak og Eskild
Where are you ↵
on my way home
I’m coming.

8

“It’s hard to tell the truth, and it’s hard to hear it. It involves feelings. It could make us feel uncomfortable with each other. But, to all of us, [hearing the truth] wasn’t bad. I believe Solar’s words strengthened our unity.”

instagram

nct127 [#MARK] I met my cool sunbaenim Xiumin at the SMTOWN workshop~~^^ it felt nice to meet him again and I had a great time #SMTOWN #JEJU

Translation: Hazel @ FY! NCT (NCTINFO) | Source: NCT 127 Official Instagram

Please take out with full credit

Guys I think there was a mistranslation in the last Eat Jin episode?? Here’s what it was translated as:

And here’s the proper translation:

Just a heads up for anyone who didn’t notice this small mistake!

3

Did you talk to Javier after the competition?
Translation credit (a-m-n-o-s) 

Those who approach the New Testament solely through English translations face a serious linguistic obstacle to apprehending what these writings say about justice. In most English translations, the word ‘justice’ occurs relatively infrequently. It is no surprise, then, that most English-speaking people think the New Testament does not say much about justice; the Bibles they read do not say much about justice. English translations are in this way different from translations into Latin, French, Spanish, German, Dutch — and for all I know, most languages.


The basic issue is well known among translators and commentators. Plato’s Republic, as we all know, is about justice. The Greek noun in Plato’s text that is standardly translated as 'justice’ is 'dikaiosune;’ the adjective standardly translated as 'just’ is 'dikaios.’ This same dik-stem occurs around three hundred times in the New Testament, in a wide variety of grammatical variants.


To the person who comes to English translations of the New Testament fresh from reading and translating classical Greek, it comes as a surprise to discover that though some of those occurrences are translated with grammatical variants on our word 'just,’ the great bulk of dik-stem words are translated with grammatical variants on our word 'right.’ The noun, for example, is usually translated as 'righteousness,’ not as 'justice.’ In English, we have the word 'just’ and its grammatical variants coming from the Latin iustitia, and the word 'right’ and its grammatical variants coming from the Old English recht. Almost all our translators have decided to translate the great bulk of dik-stem words in the New Testament with grammatical variants on the latter — just the opposite of the decision made by most translators of classical Greek.


I will give just two examples of the point. The fourth of the beatitudes of Jesus, as recorded in the fifth chapter of Matthew, reads, in the New Revised Standard Version, 'Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled.’ The word translated as 'righteousness’ is 'dikaiosune.’ And the eighth beatitude, in the same translation, reads 'Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.’ The Greek word translated as 'righteousness’ is 'dikaiosune.’ Apparently, the translators were not struck by the oddity of someone being persecuted because he is righteous. My own reading of human affairs is that righteous people are either admired or ignored, not persecuted; people who pursue justice are the ones who get in trouble.


It goes almost without saying that the meaning and connotations of 'righteousness’ are very different in present-day idiomatic English from those of 'justice.’ 'Righteousness’ names primarily if not exclusively a certain trait of personal character. … The word in present-day idiomatic English carries a negative connotation. In everyday speech one seldom any more describes someone as righteous; if one does, the suggestion is that he is self-righteous. 'Justice,’ by contrast, refers to an interpersonal situation; justice is present when persons are related to each other in a certain way.


… When one takes in hand a list of all the occurrences of dik-stem words in the Greek New Testament, and then opens up almost any English translation of the New Testament and reads in one sitting all the translations of these words, a certain pattern emerges: unless the notion of legal judgment is so prominent in the context as virtually to force a translation in terms of justice, the translators will prefer to speak of righteousness.


Why are they so reluctant to have the New Testament writers speak of primary justice? Why do they prefer that the gospel of Jesus Christ be the good news of the righteousness of God rather than the good news of the justice of God? Why do they prefer that Jesus call his followers to righteousness rather than to justice?

—  Nicholas Wolsterstorff
Alexis’s VA’s hilarious comment

Nakata Jouji, Alexis’s VA in the Book of the Atlantic movie, recently commented on Lizzie’s poster that reads “I’m fine with not being cute, as long as it means that I can protect you!!”:

There’s no way that the daughter of Tanaka Atsuko [*Frances’ VA] and me, voiced by Yukari Tamura [*Lizzie’s VA], is weak.”


And Yana replied to him:

“That’s so convincing…! Thank you!!  -Toboso”


Fun fact:

Alexis’s VA, Nakata Jouji, is known for his role as Alucard (a powerful badass vampire) in the anime series “HELLSING”.

Originally posted by twotheleft

Frances’s VA, Tanaka Atsuko, is known for her role as Motoko Kusanagi (a powerful badass cyborg) in the anime series “Ghost in the Shell”. 

Originally posted by spacefrog13

They are both actually very famous voice actors in Japan and that’s why the tweet got 33K likes and 29K reblogs and also why Yana was super excited when the Midfords’ cast was announced:

“The son (voiced by Mr. Seiichirou Yamashita) and the daughter (voiced by Ms. Yukari Tamura) who were born to the married couple of father (voiced by Mr. Jouji Nakata) and mother (voiced by Ms. Atsuko Tanaka).. you can tell just by their voices that they’re undoubtedly strong. It’s so convincing. I’m so happy. Thank you so much, Aniplex [for casting them]🙏” - Toboso

See? I told you they are the best and the strongest cast!! (≧▽≦)


Edit: Just in case…. “CV” in this context means “character voice”, not “curriculum vitae” xD