great ormond

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February 14th 1852: Great Ormond Street hospital founded

On this day in 1852, the Great Ormond Street Hopsital for Sick Children opened in London. In the mid-nineteenth century, despite high child mortality rates, there was little professional medical help available for children, with many parents opting to care for their children themselves. Dr. Charles West identified this problem, and drew attention to childhood diseases in a series of lectures. It was Dr. West who fought for the opening of Great Ormond Street, the first hospital of its kind in the UK. When the hospital first opened its doors, it had only ten beds, and was led by the matron Frances Willey. Great Ormond Street struggled financially in its first years, but in 1858 it was saved when famed author Charles Dickens gave a public reading of A Christmas Carol to raise money for the hospital. With Dickens’s money, the hospital could expand and increase its bed capacity to 75. In the years that followed, Great Ormond Street further expanded and attracted notable patrons who wanted to support its work. Most famously, in 1929 the author J.M. Barrie donated the copyright to his creation Peter Pan to the hospital, which has provided the hospital with a steady income. Great Ormond Street is a British institution, and continues to have a worldwide reputation for patient care.

Chapter Sixty-One

A/N: I know it’s not seven o’clock yet, but I thought I’d share the chapter with you early (tbh I thought you could schedule a post so that it was posted at a specific time, but apparently not, so I doubt any of my chapters will be posted at exactly 19:00). I’m sorry it’s been so long, but there’s a good fifteen chapters coming your way now :)

I hope you enjoy it. Please let me know - nothing means more to me than all your opinions 💖

Emmy walked beside Harry, both hands resting on her bump, as he pulled his suitcase along after him. They were in Heathrow Airport, where Harry would be catching his flight to Brazil for the Olympics. They had told no one about their little baby girl yet, and Harry had demanded that Emmy wait until he got back before she told people, because he wanted to see their reactions. Claire and Edward knew, as did the POs, but that was about it.

They were escorted to a private waiting room, and Harry collapsed onto one of the seats there, before gently pulling Emmy down onto his lap. He nuzzled into her throat as she loosely draped her arms round his neck. She felt slightly sick – she didn’t want him to leave again.

Claire was stood at the window, looking out, hands on her hips, at the miserable grey sky. She huffed. “Ed, you sure you don’t want to stay with Emmy this time? I’ll go with Harry.”

Edward raised an eyebrow. “No chance,” he grinned.

Emmy pouted. “Why does no one want to spend time with me?”

“It’s not personal, Emmy,” Edward laughed. “It’s just that it’s between you and a very hot country.”

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On Tuesday, whilst at Great Ormond Street Hospital getting treatment,
Ollie and Amelia got a very special personal visit from Prince Harry. 
For an hour Prince Harry sat with us talking and playing with our children, laughing and making memories. The very thing our children want the most in life, to be happy and having fun. We feel so much pride knowing that Ollie and Amelia are touching the life’s of the people they meet, with their love and their strength. The love, the support and the laughter within that treatment room on Tuesday will stay with us forever. From the bottom of our hearts we thank Prince Harry for his support, his time and his kindness towards our family and our journey with Batten Disease. It was truly incredible to watch him with our children and to have the opportunity to talk with him about our journey with Battens.

Prince Harry made a surprise visit to the Hospital where Ollie and Amelia were getting treatment, after their mother wrote to the Prince to let him know her children were garanted their treatments. 

Hi Guys!! :)

So tomorrow is the lovely @phff-opostos​ ‘s birthday, and because she is such a lovely lady and she makes the best manips ever!! So, to celebrate and to thank her for being such a joy, I’m going to post a sneak peak of the next chapter for her :D Also, if any of you speak Portuguese you should totally check out her Harry fanfic :) Happy Birthday lovely!!

It’s not much, and the chapter will be out on May 28th, but I hope you enjoy :)

Emmy walked beside Harry, both hands resting on her bump, as he pulled his suitcase along after him. They were in Heathrow Airport, where Harry would be catching his flight to Brazil for the Olympics. They had told no one about their little baby girl yet, and Harry had demanded that Emmy wait until he got back before she told people, because he wanted to see their reactions. Claire and Edward knew, as did the POs, but that was about it.

They were escorted to a private waiting room, and Harry collapsed onto one of the seats there, before gently pulling Emmy down onto his lap. He nuzzled into her throat as she loosely draped her arms round his neck. She felt slightly sick – she didn’t want him to leave again.

Claire was stood at the window, looking out, hands on her hips, at the miserable grey sky. She huffed. “Ed, you sure you don’t want to stay with Emmy this time? I’ll go with Harry.”

Edward raised an eyebrow. “No chance,” he grinned.

Emmy pouted. “Why does no one want to spend time with me?”

Keep reading

Dwight and Caroline...

Caroline was trying to hurry, but the heel of her stiletto got caught in the grate crossing the street, and snapped off. As she hobbled as fast as she could, Horace kept barking and running around in circles, finally wrapping his lead around her ankles and causing her to fall to the sidewalk, in a heap of impatience, directly across from the entrance to Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children.

The children at Great Ormond would just have to wait. While young humans weren’t really her thing, Caroline did notice how their sad little eyes lit up whenever they saw her with Horace. Then that bloody, goody-two-shoes nurse with the strange name had suggested that Caroline bring Horace to the children’s ward to cheer them up. Apparently, this was a thing people did, bring animals to visit the sick. Well, what could Caroline say but yes, with Uncle Ray and the whole board of the hospital all staring at her with such expectant looks.

Caroline sat on the sidewalk petting Horace. Thank God  she had  worn her black jeans and not that new, barely there, white skirt. She held her darling pug close and kissed his neck. Damn it!  She was furious! Her new Louboutin’s, ruined.

“May I help you?”

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10

Peter Pan

51 in x of animated feature film history
Release: Feb. 5th, 1953
Country: USA
Director: Clyde Geromini, Wilfred Jackson, Hamilton Luske

“Peter Pan, one of Walt Disney’s favorite stories, is based on the 1904 play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up by J. M. Barrie. Peter Pan is the final Disney animated feature released through RKO before Walt Disney’s founding of his own distribution company, Buena Vista Distribution, later in 1953 after the film was released. Peter Pan is also the final Disney film in which all nine members of Disney’s Nine Old Men worked together as directing animators. 

The film begins in the London nursery of Wendy, John, and Michael Darling, where the three children are visited by Peter Pan. With the help of his tiny friend, the fairy Tinkerbell, Peter takes the three children on a magical flight to Never Land. This enchanted island is home to Peter, Tink, the Lost Boys, Tiger Lily and her Native American nation, and the scheming Captain Hook who is as intent on defeating Peter Pan as he is from escaping a tick-tocking crocodile.

Peter Pan was originally intended to be Disney’s second film after Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. However he could not get the rights until four years later, after he came to an arrangement with Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, to whom Barrie had bequeathed the rights to the play. The studio started the story development and character designs in the late 1930s and early 1940s, and intended it to be his fourth film, after Snow White, Bambi and Pinocchio.

During this time Disney explored many possibilities of how the story could be interpreted. In the earliest version of the story, the film started by telling Peter Pan’s back story. Walt also explored opening the film in Neverland and Peter Pan coming to Wendy’s house to kidnap her as a mother for the Lost Boys. Eventually, Disney decided that the kidnapping was too dark. In another version of the film, Nana went to Neverland with Pan and the Darling children, and the story was told through her eyes. In other interpretations of the story John Darling was left behind for being too serious, practical and boring.

It was not until 1947, as the studio’s financial health started to improve again after WWII, that the actual production of Peter Pan commenced, even though Roy O. Disney did not think that Peter Pan would have much box office appeal.\

Milt Kahl, the supervising animator of Peter Pan and The Darling Children, claimed that the hardest thing to animate was a character floating in mid air.

Rumor has it that Tinker Bell’s design was based on Marilyn Monroe, but in reality her design was based on Tinker Bell’s live-action reference model, Margaret Kerry. Margaret Kerry posed for reference film shots on a sound stage; the footage was later used by supervising Tinker Bell animator Marc Davis and his team when they drew the character. Like Kerry, Bobby Driscoll was both the live-action reference model, mainly used for the close-up scenes, and the voice actor for Peter Pan. Peter’s flying and action reference shots, however, were provided by dancer and choreographer Roland Dupree. Similarly, Hans Conried, the voice of both Captain Hook and Mr. Darling, also performed the live-action reference footage for those characters (it was one of the few elements left over from the play, that Hook and Mr. Darling were played by the same actor). 

The film was a commercial success and was also the highest-grossing film of 1953. In 1955, it was reported that the film had earned $7 million against its budget of $4 million. Peter Pan was praised by most critics during its initial release. The New York Times gave the film a mixed review, praising the animation itself, but also declaring that the film was not really true to the spirit of the original Barrie play. Walt Disney himself was dissatisfied with the finished product, feeling that the character of Peter Pan was cold and unlikable. However, experts on J.M. Barrie praise this as a success, as they insist that Pan was originally written to be a heartless sociopath.

Peter Pan has been seen as racist in recent years due to the way Disney portrayed the Native American “Indians” in the film. They are displayed as wild, savage, violent and speak in a stereotypical way. These stereotypes are present in J. M. Barrie’s play. Marc Davis, one of the supervising animators of the film, said in an interview years after the production that ‘I’m not sure we would have done the Indians if we were making this movie now. And if we had we wouldn’t do them the way we did back then.’”

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May 9th 1860: J.M. Barrie born

On this day in 1860, the Scottish author and playwright James Matthew Barrie - best known for his creation of Peter Pan - was born in Scotland. Originally a play entitled Peter Pan or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up, which later became the novel Peter and Wendy, these stories featured an ageless boy and his friend Wendy as they had adventures in ‘Neverland’ and encountered the villainous Captain Hook. Barrie, who moved to London to pursue his writing career, was inspired to write this most famous work by his relationship with the Llewelyn Davies family. Whilst Barrie wrote other plays and novels, the adventures of Peter Pan remain his most famous, and earned him numerous honours in his lifetime including some bestowed by King George V. Before his death, Barrie gave the rights to Peter Pan to London’s Great Ormond Street Hospital for children. Barrie died in London on June 19th 1937, aged seventy-seven.

Connie Yates arriving at the Supreme Court in London as the legal fight continues for treatment for her 10-month-old Charlie

Charlie was born healthy but was admitted to hospital when he was less than two months old and has since been diagnosed with a rare genetic condition which saps energy from his muscles and organs.

Specialists at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London, where Charlie is being cared for, say therapy proposed by a doctor in the US is experimental and will not help.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4617758/European-court-decide-Charlie-Gard-s-life-support.html

……love is a great thing ,,,I hope their wishes will be come true