great globular cluster

M13: The Great Globular Cluster in Hercules : In 1716, English astronomer Edmond Halley noted, “This is but a little Patch, but it shews itself to the naked Eye, when the Sky is serene and the Moon absent.” Of course, M13 is now less modestly recognized as the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules, one of the brightest globular star clusters in the northern sky. Telescopic views reveal the spectacular cluster’s hundreds of thousands of stars. At a distance of 25,000 light-years, the cluster stars crowd into a region 150 light-years in diameter. Approaching the cluster core upwards of 100 stars could be contained in a cube just 3 light-years on a side. For comparison, the closest star to the Sun is over 4 light-years away. Along with the cluster’s dense core, the outer reaches of M13 are highlighted in this sharp color image. The cluster’s evolved red and blue giant stars show up in yellowish and blue tints. via NASA

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In 1716, English astronomer Edmond Halleynoted,  “This is but a little Patch, but it shews itself to the naked Eye, when the Sky is serene and the Moon absent." Of course, M13 is now less modestly recognized as the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules, one of the brightest globular star clusters in the northern sky. Telescopic views reveal the spectacular cluster’s hundreds of thousands of stars. At a distance of 25,000 light-years, the cluster stars crowd into a region 150 light-years in diameter. Approaching the cluster core upwards of 100 stars could be contained in a cube just 3 light-years on a side. For comparison, the closest star to the Sun is over 4 light-years away. Along with the cluster’s dense core, the outer reaches of M13 are highlighted in this sharp color image. The cluster's evolved red and blue giant stars show up in yellowish and blue tints.
For image credit and copyright guidance, please visit the image website http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap170512.html

Time And Space

M13: The Great Globular Cluster in Hercules : In 1716, English astronomer Edmond Halley noted, This is but a little Patch, but it shews itself to the naked Eye, when the Sky is serene and the Moon absent. Of course, M13 is now less modestly recognized as the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules, one of the brightest globular star clusters in the northern sky. Telescopic views reveal the spectacular clusters hundreds of thousands of stars. At a distance of 25,000 light-years, the cluster stars crowd into a region 150 light-years in diameter. Approaching the cluster core upwards of 100 stars could be contained in a cube just 3 light-years on a side. For comparison, the closest star to the Sun is over 4 light-years away. Along with the clusters dense core, the outer reaches of M13 are highlighted in this sharp color image. The clusters evolved red and blue giant stars show up in yellowish and blue tints. via NASA

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M13, The great globular cluster in Hercules.

M13 is a dense cluster of around 300,000 stars that can be seen through a small pair of binoculars or a telescope.
It is about 145 light years in diameter, and over 25,100 light years away.

Imagine the potential for life around 1 star, now imagine it for 300,000.
All of which are within such a small astronomical distance from one another that it wouldn’t take long to hop from one solar system to the next.

M13: A Great Globular Cluster of Stars : M13 is one of the most prominent and best known globular clusters. Visible with binoculars in the constellation of Hercules, M13 is frequently one of the first objects found by curious sky gazers seeking celestials wonders beyond normal human vision. M13 is a colossal home to over 100,000 stars, spans over 150 light years across, lies over 20,000 light years distant, and is over 12 billion years old. At the 1974 dedication of Arecibo Observatory, a radio message about Earth was sent in the direction of M13. The featured image in HDR, taken through a small telescope, spans an angular size just larger than a full Moon, whereas the inset image, taken by Hubble Space Telescope, zooms in on the central 0.04 degrees. via NASA

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In 1716, English astronomer Edmond Halley noted, “This is but a little Patch, but it shews itself to the naked Eye, when the Sky is serene and the Moon absent.” Of course, M13 is now less modestly recognized as the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules, one of the brightest globular star clusters in the northern sky. Telescopic views reveal the spectacular cluster’s hundreds of thousands of stars. At a distance of 25,000 light-years, the cluster stars crowd into a region 150 light-years in diameter. Approaching the cluster core upwards of 100 stars could be contained in a cube just 3 light-years on a side. For comparison, the closest star to the Sun is over 4 light-years away. Along with the cluster’s dense core, the outer reaches of M13 are highlighted in this sharp color image. The cluster’s evolved red and blue giant stars show up in yellowish and blue tints.

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1: M13. The Great globular cluster in Hercules. Around 300,000 stars exist within this cluster.
2: M11. The wild duck cluster. You can see the different variations of stars through their colours.
3: M57. The ring nebula.The planetary nebula seen here is the remenants of a dying Red giant.
4: Saturn.
5: The battered Lunar surface.


The first 3 images of deep sky objects were all 30 seconds exposures through a 10" Newtonian. My polar alignment was way off, hence the trailing.
The last 2 images of Planetary objects were both taken with my ASI120MC at 1 minute recordings.

flickr

M13 by Don McCrady
Via Flickr:
M13, the Great Hercules globular cluster, taken through the SVS130 and STL-4020M. 3 hours total exposure, 1 hour per red, green, blue filter. Processed in Maxim/DL and Photoship CC. Final image upsampled 2x.