This gravestone from 1875 reads:

“Kate McCormick, Seduced and pregnant by her father’s friend, Unwed she died from abortion, her only choice, Abandoned in life and death by family, With but a single rose from her mother, Buried only through the kindness of an unknown benefactor, Died February 1875, age 21, Victim of an unforgiving society, Have mercy on us.”

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Necropolis of Hierapolis

Hierapolis, Phrygia, Turkey


The necropolis is one of the best preserved and extensive of its kind in the world. This city of the dead contains tumuli, sarcophagi and house shaped tombs lying stretched along both sides of the road extending 2km to the north. Most of about the 1200 tombs were constructed with local varieties of limestone. The extent of this necropolis attests again to the importance Hierapolis had in the Antiquity. It is worth taking one’s time to wander amongst the tombs, that date from antiquity to early Christian times, and marvel at the ostentation that these residents of Heirapolis afforded to their tombs. It has a fairyland quality.

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Legend says that a cemetery in Castletown, Isle of Man, is the final resting place to a vampire. In 1854, 54-year-old Matthew Halsall passed away. As is customary, his family and the locals held a wake and drank copious amounts of alcohol in his memory. At some point in the evening, it was said that the group of people heard a loud groan coming from the coffin. Believing that Halsall was still alive, they broke open the casket to see that he was indeed very much dead, leading them to believe that he was a vampire. They obtained a stake and pierced it through is heart, re-buried him with a slate on concrete over the grave and then surrounded the grave with chains. It was widely believed that this would prevent the vampire rising from the dead.