Euskara is fun!!:  suffix -dun

Basque suffix “-dun” it’s just the short form of “duen” - “the one who has”. It’s a very useful - and used - suffix. There you go some examples:

- Txapeldun - lit. “the one who has the beret” - champion
- Euskaldun - lit. “the one who has the Basque language” - Basque speaker
- Arduradun - lit. “the one who has responsability” - responsible
- Haurdun - lit. “the one who has a child” - pregnant
- Dirudun - lit. “the one who has money” - wealthy
- Errudun - lit. “the one who has the blame” - guilty
- etab.

Easy? ^_~

Russian Indirect/Revers Sentences

There are quite a lot of set expressions in Russian, where the word order is indirect, and the whole logic of a sentence is of Yakov Smirnoff type: the real subject, the one who acts is in indirect form (in any case other than the Nominative), and the object is in the Nominative and IS technically a subject. Here are three most common types of such expressions:

  • Having something: У + Noun/ Pronoun in Genitive + есть + Object in the Nominative ( formal subject) У нашего народа есть надежда. Our people have a hope.

  • Needing something: Noun/ Pronoun in Dative + нужен/ нужна/ нужно/ нужны + Object in the Nominative ( formal subject) Нашему народу нужна правда! Our people need the truth!

  • Liking something: Noun/ Pronoun in Dative + нравится/нравятся + Object in the Nominative ( formal subject) Нашему народу нравится искренность. Our people like sincerity.

Just remember that when you want to express your likes or needs, or say that you have something, you should put the object, the topic of your sentence, in the Nominative.

I love Internet grammar I love how “you what mate” is an incredulous question but “u wot m8” is an invitation to fight I love how straight people are different to Straight People I love how smol is so much smaller than small I live how thiS, tHIS and THIS are all different in my mind i luv how dis spelling make sarcasm I love how haha, lol and lmao are completely different emotions I love how….. This…. Makes everything… So much more dramatic???? Tone is so hard to convey in writing u go lil buddies you go

21 Spanish filler words

Spanish Filler Words

1) Bueno: Well

Ex: “bueno, no importa” = “well, it doesn’t matter”

2) O sea / Es decir: I mean, in other words, that is to say

Ex: “El jefe no me ha hablado todavía, o sea / es decir, de verdad no sé.” = “The boss hasn’t talked to me yet, so in other words, I don’t really know.”

3) Así que: So, therefore

¿Así que al final fuiste al restaurante? = So you ended up going to the restaurant?

4) Pues: Well

Ex: Pues… no sé, tengo mucho sueño = Well… I don’t know, I’m really tired

5) Mira = Look / look here

Ex: “Mira, sólo digo que a mí no me parece una buena idea.” = “Look, I’m just saying that I don’t think that it is a good idea.”

6) Che: Hey, hey buddy ( mostly used in Argentina but also used in Uruguay and Valencia, Spain)

Ex: “¡Che! ¿Qué tal, hombre?” = “Hey! What’s up, man?”

7)  A ver: Let’s see

Ex: A ver… ¿qué podemos hacer esta noche? = Let’s see… what can we do tonight?

8) Vamos a ver: Let’s see

Vamos a ver qué hay para hacer esta noche = Let’s see what there is to do tonight

9. Está bien / Dale = Okay, a synonym of Spanish in Spain is “vale”

Ex: “Mañana te llamo, ¿dale? – ¡Dale! / Está bien.” = “I give you a call tomorrow, okay?  – Okay!”

10) Tipo / como = Like

Ex: “Es tipo / como el pie Americano” = “It’s like the American pie”

11) Entonces: So, therefore

Ex: “Entonces, cuando vas a visitar a tu abuela?” = “So, when are you going to visit your grandma?’

12) Este: Uh, umm, ah

Ex: “Sí, este… rompí tu telefono” = “Yeah, umm…I broke your phone”

13) A propósito / por cierto: By the way

Ex: “A propósito, ¿sabes dónde está María?” = “By the way, do you know where Maria is?”

14) Luego: Then (it can also mean “later” in another context)

Ex: “Fui a la farmacia y luego a casa” =  “I went to the drugstore and then home.”

15) Por lo menos: At least

Ex: “Por lo menos no te quemaste” = “At least you didn’t burn yourself”

16) ¿Sabes?: You know?

Ex: Es muy importante para mí, ¿sabes? = It’s really important to me, you know?

17) Por fin: Finally, at last

Ex: “¡Por fin! ¡Estás aquí!” = “Finally! You’re here!”

“Por fin, tenemos la tarea de todos.” = “At last, we’ve got everyone’s homework.”

17) Quizás / tal vez: Maybe, perhaps

Ex: “Quizás/ Tal vez no debí haberme comido toda sea comida” = “Maybe I shouldn’t have eaten all that food”

18) Aunque: Although, even though

Ex: “Aunque está lloviendo, voy a ir al gym” = “Even though it’s raining, I’m going to the gym”

19) Además: Moreover, besides, also, and occasionally used as “too”

Ex: “El queso es demasiado suave, demasiado débil, y además huele muy mal.” = “Cheese is too soft, too weak, and besides, it smells terrible.”

20) Sin embargo: However, nonetheless, nevertheless

“Entiendo que el queso no es tan fuerte como el acero, pero sin embargo voy a hacer un carro con él.” = “I understand that cheese isn’t as strong as steel, but nevertheless I’m going to make a car out of it.”

21) De hecho: actually

Ex: “De hecho, nunca vi esta película pero dicen que es digna ser vista.” = “Actually, I’ve never seen that movie, but they say it is worth it.”

English usage PSA because this is driving me crazy: 

  • ‘Everyday’ is an adjective used to describe something rote, routine, or pedestrian, as in, “Because her gown was being dry-cleaned, she was forced to wear a boring everyday dress to the party.” ‘Everyday’ can also be used as a noun to refer to regular life in general, as in, “Joe grew bored with the everyday in Cleveland, snapped one morning, sold his things, and moved to Paris.”
  • ‘Every day’ is an adverb phrase indicating that something happens with regularity every 24 hours, as in, “I go to the same coffee shop every day.”

Pro-tip: if you can replace ‘every’ with ‘each’ and the sentence still makes sense (as in, “I go to the coffee shop each day” but not “..she was forced to wear her each day dress to the party”) there should be a space in there. 

Cool? Cool.

Now, as adherents of the great and terrible AP Stylebook — which also eschews the Oxford comma — we must admit the moral of this story flies in the face of everything (or one thing) NPR’s own sentences stand for.

But we offer these stories as a reminder that every punctuation mark deserves a fair hearing, a glimpse into the glories of grammar(,) and a quiet rebellion against the tyranny of copy editors everywhere.*

*Just a joke, NPR copy desk! Please don’t break out the red pen.

The Oxford Comma: Great For Listing, Pontificating, And Winning Court Cases

Image by Chelsea Beck/NPR

7

Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events (2017-), The Wide Window

(s01e05)

Korean Grammar - Verbs [Part 3/∞]

At long last, here’s a list of some very common verbs in Korean!~

Enjoy!

*remember to try and sound out each word before peeking at the romanization!~

오다 (oh da) - to come

가다 (ga da) - to go

먹다 (meok da) - to eat

마시다 (ma shi da) - to drink

주다 (joo da) - to give

갖다 (gaj da) - to have

받다 (bad da) - to receive 

배우다 (bae woo da) - to learn

가르치다 (ga reu chi da) - to teach

공부하다 (gong bu ha da) - to study 

연습하다 (yeon seub ha da) - to practice

일하다 (il ha da) - to work

준비하다 (joon bi ha da) - to prepare

앉다 (anj da) - to sit

운동하다 (oon dong ha da) - to exercise

쉬다 (shwi da) - to rest

일어나다 (yi reo na da) - to stand up

걷다 (geot da) - to walk

달리다 (dal li da) - to run

춤추다 (choom chu da) - to dance 

일어나다 (yi reo na da) - to wake up

자다 (ja da) - to sleep

꿈꾸다 (kkum kku da) - to dream

악몽 꾸다 (ak mong kku da) - to have a nightmare  

울다 (ool da) - to cry

웃다 (oot da) - to smile/laugh

듣다 (deud da) - to listen/hear

말하다 (mal ha da) - to talk, speak

보다 (bo da) - to see

감다 (gam da) - to close (one’s eyes)

빌리다 (bil li da) - to lend/borrow

돌려주다 (dol ryeo joo da) - to return

열다 (yeol da) - to open

닫다 (dat da) -  to close to open

사다 (sa da) - to buy

내다 (nae da) - to pay

팔다 (pal da) - to sell 

신다 (shin da) - to wear (shoes, socks, footwear)

입다 (ib da) - to wear (clothes)

벗다 (beot da) - to remove/take off/undress (clothes)

이기다 (yi gi da) - to win

지다 (ji da) - to lose 

읽다 (ilk da) - to read 

쓰다 (sseu da) - to write/to wear

기억하다 (gi yeok ha da) - to remember

잊다 (it da) - to forget

시작하다 (shi jak ha da) - to start

끝나다 (kkeut na da) - to finish  

묻다 (moot da) - to ask

대답하다 (dae dab ha da) - to answer 

출발하다 (chul bal ha da) - to depart

도착하다 (do chak ha da) - to arrive 

생각하다 (saeng gak ha da) - to think

알다 (al da) - to know

모르다 (mo reu da) - to not know

결혼하다 (gyeol hon ha da) - to marry

축하하다 (chuk ha ha da) - to congratulate

태어나다 (tae eo na da) - to be born

살다 (sal da) - to live

헤어지다 (hae eo ji da) - to separate

운전하다 (oon jeon ha da) - to drive

좋아하다 (joh ah ha da) - to like

싫어하다 (shil eo ha da) - to dislike

사랑하다 (sa rang ha da) - to love

미워하다 (mi wo ha da) - to hate

있다 (yit da) - to have

없다 (eob da) - to not have

들어오다 (deul eo oh da) - to enter

나가다 (na ga da) - to exit

씻다 (shid da) - to wash

청소하다 (cheong so ha da) - to clean

약속하다 (yak sok ha da) - to promise

거짓말하다 (geo jit mal ha da) - to lie

고백하다 (go baek ha da) - to confess

요리하다 (yo ri ha da) - to cook

끓이다 (kkeul yi da) - to boil

썰다 (sseol da) - to chop, slice

튀기다 (twi gi da) - to (deep) fry

재다 (jae da) - to measure, weigh

섞다 (seok da) - to mix, blend

굽다 (gub da) - to roast, grill, bake

볶다 (bokk da) - to stir fry

찌다 (jji da) - to steam

휘젓다 (hwi jeot da) - to stir

까다 (kka da) - to peel

만나다 (man na da) - to meet

주문하다 (joo mun ha da) - to order

전화하다 (jeon hwa ha da) - to make a phone call

타다 (ta da) - to ride

필요하다 (pil yo ha da) - to need

도와주다 (do wa joo da) - to help

하다 (ha da) - to do

걱정하다 (geok jeong ha da) - to worry

보내다 (bo nae da) - to send

사용하다 (sa yong ha da) - to use

싸우다 (ssa woo da) - to fight

Hope this helps and happy studying!~

[p/c 19tc.tumblr.com]

Correct grammar

Today, Mark -who normally completely and utterly ignores TLS-related questions- couldn’t resist correcting a grammar mistake on Twitter: 

Now wait. Where have I seen that before… 

Ok. Bye. 

Note: Of course this can also mean that Mark is just super annoyed by all the questions about TLS. In that case I just love coincidences like these😉