gothi

anonymous asked:

i like your blog but you post to many black goths. imho they just dont look right.

They look just as beautiful as any white goths and they have the right to express themselves and exist in this space as much as anyone else.

I’ve said this before but I’ll repeat since it needs to be said:

There is no right skin colour to be goth. Period. Goth is a composite of multiple things and appearance is just one fraction of all that. Skin colour, hair colour, make-up style, gender, and whatnot do not define whether you can be goth or not, and no way is the “right” way to have them.

The pale red-lipped and black-haired girl dressed in all black might be the stereotype of a goth but that is a very shallow and one-sided representation of the people in the community. How many of us actually fit into that stereotype? How many of us strive to look like that because if we don’t, we will get told we don’t look right? Goth has since its beginning featured many ethnicities, and there is nothing weird about non-white goths in the subculture. Research information and photos of the English goth scene in the 80s. There are loads of non-white goths absolutely rocking the original look (not to mention creating other forms of gothy art like alternative music). The main reason it “doesn’t look right” to you is because the stereotype is so strong and over-represented in gothic imagery. But we all know stereotypes can be terribly, terribly wrong, which leads to this kind of racism (yes, that’s what this is).

There are many gothic styles I personally don’t like, but it is not my place to tell those people that I don’t think they look good. I wouldn’t want them telling me that, so why would I do that to others? And I’m talking about styles that someone chooses to wear, so can you even imagine hearing it about something you cannot choose like skin colour? I understand that it is your personal preference and your opinion but is it necessary to bring it up when all it will do is discourage people from being a part of a community they feel they belong to? There’s a ton of people outside the subculture whose ignorance can make being a goth difficult, we shouldn’t be doing that to each other within the subculture too.

Some goths are black, some goths are Asian, some goths wear hijabs, some goths keep their natural hair, the list goes on. And they all look gorgeous and have as much right to express themselves in the subculture as white goths. In reality the subculture is extremely diverse but there is so much gate-keeping from goths who think that you need to look like X and listen to Y that we end up only seeing a glimpse of it all. That shouldn’t be, and as corny as it sounds, we should try to create a comfortable, safe community instead of one that shuns people out because they do not fit a stereotype.

The non-white goths aren’t going anywhere from my blog, they belong there as much as any white goth, classic horror heroine or Addams Family member.

kworking  asked:

Now here's my Whump request! I'm an Evil person, muahahah! Have him burned somehow! X) Please! <3

Ooh, yes! Irony! Love it. *evil smile*

A/N: There is a tiny bit of swearing. Can’t keep it clean all the time, especially with these guys.


The attack on the Hunter ship was going well. Hiccup and the Dragon Riders were intercepting a shipment of dragons that was heading north. They’d gotten its location from another ship that they’d raided two days before.

Hiccup and Toothless blasted at one of the ship’s many catapults, then quickly swooped up to dodge the arrows that were sent their way.

“Hiccup, look out!” Snotlout shouted.

He twisted in the saddle to see what he meant for him to dodge. His startled eyes were met with fire, barely a foot away from him. He couldn’t react before it was on him, raging hot and insatiable. It made quick work of a good portion of his clothes, baring skin that could do nothing but burn. It was hot, so hot, and he thought he heard himself scream. It ate away at him with a vengeance. Then the fire was gone, taking Hiccup’s consciousness with it.


“Snotlout, this is all your fault!”

“My fault?! How is this my fault?!”

Keep reading

All singing together an ancient rhyme, but no word did they speak to the mistress of the house. Strange to hear, and frightful to look upon, were these twelve women, with their horns and their wheels; and the mistress felt near to death, and she tried to rise that she might call for help, but she could not move, nor could she utter a word or a cry, for the spell of the witches was upon her.

—Lay Wilde, The Horned Women

art by Gustave Dore