gotham-central

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In 1941′s Batman #7 Batman and Robin are officially deputised by Commissioner Gordon, hereby evade the whole “hey, isn’t vigilantism illegal“ thing. This also remained a part of the 1966 Batman series, emphasising that Batman and Robin were working within the law as they went out in disguise to beat up the poor and mentally ill.

I kid, I kid. Later writers weren’t quite so attached to the idea of Batman and Robin being a part of the police department, Frank Miller (unsurprisingly) said in an interview in the Legends of the Dark Knight: The History of Batman book that one of the reasons he disliked the show was that:

The worst thing they did on the old TV show was give Batman a badge. You don’t deputize Batman.

Miller himself prefered to write Batman as an outlaw, fitting more with the libertarian/quasi-fascist tone he brought to his various versions of the character.

Most writers in the late-1990s and 2000s had Batman more in the Urban Myth category, so that the cops and Batman didn’t have an official relationship, per se. The excellent Gotham Central series introduced the idea that the only person authorised to turn on the Bat Signal was the office temp, as it was illegal for a member of the GCPD to summon Batman. This was due to a criminal successfully arguing that the cops had sent Batman to beat him up, to the cops had to add an extra step to by-pass the new rules.

Grant Morrison changed the relationship yet again in his run, by having Commissioner Gordon telling someone that the relationship between Batman and the GCPD was more in the “consultant“ category. There is precedent for policemen to call in psychics when it seems investigations had hit a dead end, why not summon the local superhero?

More recently Scott Snyder’s great run on Batman literally had Batman as a member of the GCPD, with Jim Gordon officially adopting the role for a time following Bruce Wayne getting amnesia. There he had both the backing of the police department and Batman Beyond villain Derek Power’s (non-villainous) mother, and lasted for as long as it took Bruce’s brain to recover.

many don’t like jared letos joker as much as they like heath ledgers joker and I can understand that but jareds facial expressions are A.M.A.Z.I.N.G.

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There is no comic I recommend more often or more emphatically than Brubaker, Rucka and Lark's Gotham Central. It is easily one of the best superhero comics of the last twenty years–probably one of the best superhero comics ever. It is thrillingly written, gorgeously drawn, and emotionally resonant–and on top of this? Its treatment of gender, race, and sexuality isn’t just nuanced, but central to the storyline.

The first thing you need to know is that it isn’t really a superhero story. Gotham Central is about the Gotham City Police Department in general, the Major Crimes Unit in particular–caped characters pop up here and there, but the series is mostly about mopping up after them. It’s an ensemble story, and every single character is memorable, but the true protagonist and beating heart of the story is Renee Montoya. Half a Life, the comic’s second arc, deals with her outing as a lesbian to the GCPD–and if her story had stopped there, it would have been fantastic. Half a Life deals with professional discrimination, family tension, and the reality of being a lesbian woman of color–in a memorable scene, Renee confronts Maggie Sawyer, her white lesbian boss, for assuming their experiences are identical. But her story doesn't stop there. Renee’s arc goes on to deal with killing in the line of duty, confronting police corruption, the loss of friends on the force, and her own predilection for violence. It’s an incredible lesson in how to lead a female character down a dark path the right way–it’s never exploitative, it’s never gross, it’s never because of her gender or sexuality. It’s never cheap. Renee’s is the kind of hard-bitten, morally thorny sojourn reserved almost entirely for male characters.

But even apart from Renee, Gotham Central is tremendous. Soft Targets, the focus of the second volume, is one of my favorite Joker arcs ever, and I have serious Joker fatigue. Nature, a single issue story, gives Poison Ivy a personality beyond Sexy Plant Lady. Gotham Central even made me briefly care about the shitshow that was Infinite Crisis. I don’t even really like police procedurals! It’s just that goddamn good.

(So you want to get into comics?)

“Titus likes you...too much” - Older!Damian Wayne x Reader

I know I said I wouldn’t write anything until Friday or Saturday, but I just realized this story was done and for some reason I didn’t post it so why not post it now right ? So here we go. Specially written for @loverandomness2. Some fluffy love for the youngest Wayne boy. I’m sorry if you didn’t want an older!Damian and if that’s not what you wanted at all but…yeah, hope you’ll like it

PS : there’s a little surprise for @epickimmie somewhere in this fic. Hope it is ok that I did this.
PPS : Also, this story kinda became some sort of sequel to another story I wrote with Damian, which is here : The First time is serious business

My masterlist blog : https://ella-ravenwood-archives.tumblr.com

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It was early in the morning when Damian finally came home. Came back to you. 

It had been a few years since his father retired and Damian inherited the Batman’s cowl. Most nights, he was out fighting crimes in Gotham, though, since his dad’s younger years, G-city was way safer, and it often happened that Damian came home early, or sometimes, didn’t go out at all (besides, he still had the help of his brothers, and they took turn to watch over the city…so really, you often had times with him, even if he was also quite busy during the day, as he became Wayne Inc’s CEO as well). It didn’t mean that there wasn’t any work ever though, like tonight, a new guy who called himself the “Joker’s son” was menacing the streets, and Damian was exhausted as he finally came home…But really, more often than not, the city was now calm. 

Bruce was beyond happy about that, as he sacrificed his own life so others wouldn’t have to. Sometimes, when you went over to Wayne’s Manor (you and Damian moved in a penthouse in the heart of Gotham quite a while ago), you felt a bit sad for your father-in-law…But nowadays, seeing his sons happy sufficed to make him happier than ever since his parents’ death. 

None of his children still lived in the Manor, but, now that they were all grown up and understood some of the difficult choices he had to take (it took Jason a little more than his brothers to get it), they all “forgave” him for any mistakes he might have done while trying the best he could to raise them, and often visited him and Alfred. 

Besides, since a little while, a certain Selina Kyle finally decided to move in with him so, Damian’s father wasn’t lonely, and that was great. He could finally live his life, after all those years, after sacrificing his youth and health…Finally, he was at peace (or almost, as sometimes, he couldn’t stay away from the bat-computer and such).  

As Damian came in your bedroom, shoulders hunched with fatigue, rubbing his face softly, you couldn’t help but be happy at the mere sight of him. You guys all came such a long way since you first met him…You were barely ten years old when you first encountered the youngest boy in the Wayne family, and so much had changed since those times. 

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