got this published just in time

anonymous asked:

ykno speaking of paradox space-what even happened to it? it was hyped as a big homestuck anthology online, then it went on pause, then it suddenly went into print with preorder and it posted a preview of an exclusive story for the book, and then it just? disappeared? was the book ever actual published?? it feels a lot like those snapchat upd8s-they were around and hyped up then just. disappeared.

Hmm… don’t quote me on this, but I vaguely recall seeing something about it not being financially viable? Like, they were actually paying the artists, and I don’t think it was bringing enough money back in ad revenue or whatever. Plus, and you’d have to check the timelines for this, but I think it might’ve kinda faded away as the whole Odd Gentlemen drama ramped up? So their time, attention, and funds might’ve gotten redirected. I have no clue if the book ever got published.

Re: snapchats, IDK about those. It may be that again, stuff got redirected since obviously the game was taking more effort than anticipated (since it was supposed to be released in January) since so many of the people working on one WP thing are also working on all the others. 

  • <p> <b>Fanfic writer:</b> And publish! Finally got this story out now I can sleep. Hmm, maybe I should wait for a review.<p/><b>Fanfic writer:</b> *refreshes 2000 times."<p/><b></b> *20 minutes later*<p/><b>Reviews:</b> *1+ review*- Good story<p/><b>Fanfic Writer:</b> DEAR WHAT'S YOUR FACE YOU ARE THE GREATEST PERSON TO EVER BE BORN. I PERSONALLY THANK YOUR MOTHER FOR GIVING BIRTH FOR YOU. YOU ARE THE ONLY THING THAT GIVES ME LIFE.<p/></p>
2

Here’s some of the most amazing and invaluable advice you’ll most-likely ever get from one of my good colleagues and legends in comics/gaming, creator JOE MADUREIRA. It’s what i’ve been preaching to you aspiring artists since i arrived on DA, but i think his POV says it perfectly:

*WARNING: SOME MATURE LANGUAGE*

“DO YOU REALLY WANT TO BE A SUCCESSFUL ARTIST? 


Or a successful WORKING PROFESSIONAL?



Believe it or not there is a difference. I’m not usually a soapbox type guy, I don’t like instructing people, and I think I’m a terrible teacher. But hey, it’s Friday and I’m in a strange mood. So here goes:

I’ve noticed that a good number of my fans happen to be aspiring artists themselves. This is for all you guys. I get asked constantly: "Where should I go to school?” “What classes should I take?” “What should I study for anatomy?” “What pencils and paper do you use?” “Should I be working digitally now instead of traditionally?” “How do I fix my poses? Learn composition? Perspective?” “When am I going to develop my own style?” “Who were your influences?” “Teach me how to draw hands!” The list goes on…

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Here’s the deal. All of that stuff *is* important, and it may nudge you in the right direction. A lot of it you will discover for yourself. What works best for one person doesn’t work for another. That’s the beauty of art. It’s personal. It’s discovery. DON’T WORRY ABOUT ALL THAT CRAP!

Instead I’m going to answer the questions that you *SHOULD* be asking, but aren’t. These are things that have only recently occurred to me, after doing this for 20+ years. These things seem so obvious, but apparently they elude a lot of people, because I am surprised at how many ridiculously talented artists are ‘failing’ professionally. Or just unhappy. The beauty of what I’m about to tell you is that it doesn’t matter what field you’re in or what your art style is.

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In no particular order:


1) DO WHAT YOU LOVE. If you are passionate about what you’re doing, it shows. If you’re having fun, it shows. If you’re bored, IT SHOWS. Some guys are able to work on stuff they have zero interest in, and still pull off great work, but I find that when I do this my motivation takes a huge hit. And Motivation is key. Money is not a great motivator. It’s temporary like everything else. And honestly, I’ve gotten paid the most money for some of the shittiest work I have ever done. That may sound awesome, but it’s not. And here’s why…

2) You MUST stay Excited and Motivated. Have you noticed that there are days you can’t draw a god damned thing? And some days you feel like you can draw anything? It’s 4am but you don’t notice because you are in the ZONE. Your hand is racing ahead of your mind and you can do no wrong?! Maybe it’s some new paper you got. Or a new program you’ve been wanting to try out. Or you just found some amazing shit on DeviantArt, or watched some movie that just makes you want to run straight to your board. This relates to the above because while it is possible to involve yourself in projects you aren’t excited about—maybe you need the cash, or think it will look good on your resume, whatever it is—it’s not going to last. You need to stay fresh. Expose yourself to new things. New techniques. You should be getting tired of your own shit on a fairly regular basis. Otherwise other people will.

3) Check your Ego. If you think you’re the shit, you’re already doomed. You may be really, really good at what you do, but there’s someone better. Sorry. There’s always plenty to learn, even for us old dogs. So when I meet young upstarts who have this sense of entitlement, or a know-it-all attitude, I just have to laugh. Some of the biggest egos I’ve ever witnessed were from people who have accomplished the least. Meanwhile, most guys who are supremely talented AND successful, and have EARNED the RIGHT to have an ego and throw their weight around, don’t. Why is that? It’s because…

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4) RELATIONSHIPS ARE IMPORTANT. This may be one of the biggest lessons I’ve had to learn. Early on, I didn’t value my relationships with people. Creatively or otherwise. I felt like I didn’t need anyone’s help and I could figure everything out on my own. Let’s face it, many of us become artists because we are reclusive, social misfits. We’d rather stay inside and draw shit than go outside and play. We like to live inside our own minds. Why not?! It’s awesome in there! And sometimes we don’t want to let other people in. But like I said—you can’t do it alone. I can honestly say that as much as I try to stay current, as much as I try to push my work and draw kick ass shit that will excite people, I would not be where I am today if it weren’t for all the other people I’ve met and learned from along the way. Guys who pulled strings for me. Took risks on me. Believed I was the right guy for the job. You need to manage your relationships. You need to network, and meet people. Drawing comics is still a pretty good place for reclusive types—but if you want to work in big studios—Making games, Films, animation, basically any other type of job on the planet, you’d better start making some connections. Be likeable. Be professional. That doesn’t mean be an opportunistic ladder climber. Fake people lose in the end. Be yourself, but be professional. It’s no secret that when people are hiring, our first instinct is to bring in people we know. It’s human nature. I don’t like unknowns, even if their portfolio is awesome. If we have a mutual connection, if they have great things to say about you, you’re in. If you have AMAZING artwork to show, and I call your last employer and they tell me what a pain in the ass you are to work with, you’re done. Talent and skill only get you so far. I am literally amazed at how often I meet guys that are total assholes and think they are going to get anywhere.

5) Here’s the BIG ONE. The greatest obstacle you will ever have to overcome IS YOURSELF. And the Fear that you are creating in your own head. Stay positive. Stop defeating yourself. There are artists I know that are so damn good they make me pee my pants. I look up to these mofos. I study their shit and I want to draw like them. And they are almost NEVER working on their DREAM project. And—big surprise, they aren’t happy in their job. “Why NOT?! WTF is WRONG WITH YOU?!” is usually my reaction. And the answer is almost always “The market isn’t great right now” “Other stories/games/comics like mine don’t do very well” “The shit that’s hot right now is nothing like mine, It’s just going to fail.” “I’m not sure I’m good enough.” “I need the money.” “Too Risky.” “I tried it before and failed. ” It doesn’t matter what words they use, they are afraid for one reason or another. I know. I’ve been there.

But here’s the deal. YOU NEED TO TAKE RISKS. Guess what? YOU ARE MOST LIKELY GOING TO FAIL. If you want it—REALLY want it, that won’t stop you. You will learn A LOT. My good friend Tim constantly jokes about how I jump out of planes without a parachute and worry about the landing on the way down. You may think that I’m lucky, that it’s easy for me to say because I’m already successful, that I’m in a different situation than you all are. But it’s not true. Risk is risk, no matter what level you’re at. If you’re already successful, you just take even bigger risks. But they never go away. Everything in life is Risk vs. Reward. Not just in your career. LIFE. You’d better get used to it.

I didn’t know what the hell I was doing when I got into comics. I left the #1 selling book at the time ( Uncanny X-men ) to work on Battle Chasers during a time when 'Conan’ was about the only fantasy comic people knew. And no one was buying it. I wanted to work in games, so I started a game company. I had NO IDEA WTF I was doing. I just wanted it, really bad. We tanked. It failed. No big surprise. But the people I worked with got hired elsewhere and rehired me. I started ANOTHER game Company. We had 4 people and a dream, and some publishers wouldn’t even meet with us, because their 'next gen console’ teams had 90+ people on them. I literally got hung up on. “Stick to handheld games, it’s smaller, maybe you can handle that…” one MAJOR publisher told us. I don’t blame them. But we didn’t let it stop us. Thank god we didn’t listen to them. Vigil was born. Darksiders happened, AND we got to make a sequel. It stands shoulder to shoulder with the best games in the industry, and the most elite and experienced game dev studios in the world. How is that possible?!!! Hardly any of us had even worked on a console game before. I’ll be honest, I was thinking we would fail the whole time. I just didn’t care. If I had to play the odds on this one, I’d bet against us.

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Why am I telling you all this shit? This is not me patting myself on the back. It’s just stuff that has somehow only dawned on me recently when it’s been staring me in the face for so long. I feel like I need to wake you guys up!!! I’ve been limiting myself. I’ve gotten afraid. I’ve taken less risks. I saw my career going places I didn’t want to go. I wasn’t happy and I wasn’t excited. And I’ve realized, that all that stuff I just talked about is the reason I am where I am today. Not because I have a manga style, or I draw cool hands, or there’s energy in my drawings, or all the other things people rattle off to me. There are other guys that do all that same shit, and do it better. And amazingly, those same guys constantly tell me “Man, I wish I could do what you are doing.” “SO DO IT!!!!!” PLEASE listen to me—because I want you guys to make it. I want to look to one of you people for inspiration some day when it’s 2am and I need to keep drawing. Stop worrying about all the other stuff—the pencils, the paper, the anatomy, all that shit. It will only get you so far. You’ve already got most of what you need. I hope this helps some people. From the bottom of my heart, thank you for all the support over the years. You are all one of the greatest motivating forces in my life and my career. Sappy but true. Ok, let’s go draw some shit!!!“

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Top Misconceptions People Have about Pulp-Era Science Fiction

A lot of people I run into have all kinds of misconceptions about what pulp-era scifi, from the 1920s-1950s, was actually like. 


“Pulp-Era Science Fiction was about optimistic futures.”

Optimistic futures were always, always vastly outnumbered by end of the world stories with mutants, Frankenstein creations that turn against us, murderous robot rebellions, terrifying alien invasions, and atomic horror. People don’t change. Then as now, we were more interested in hearing about how it could all go wrong. 

To quote H.L. Gold, editor of Galaxy Science Fiction, in 1952: 

“Over 90% of stories submitted to Galaxy Science Fiction still nag away at atomic, hydrogen and bacteriological war, the post atomic world, reversion to barbarism, mutant children killed because they have only ten toes and fingers instead of twelve….the temptation is strong to write, ‘look, fellers, the end isn’t here yet.’”

The movie Tomorrowland is a particulary egregious example of this tremendous misconception (and I can’t believe Brad Bird passed on making Force Awakens to make a movie that was 90 minutes of driving through the Florida swamps). In reality, pre-1960s scifi novels trafficked in dread, dystopian futures, and fear. There was simply never a time when optimistic scifi was overrepresented, even the boyish Jules Verne became skeptical of the possibilities of technology all the way at the turn of the century. One of the most famous pulp scifi yarns was Jack Williamson’s The Humanoids, about a race of Borg-like robots who so totally micromanage humans “for our own protection” that they leave us with nothing to do but wait “with folded hands.”


“Pulp scifi often featured muscular, large-chinned, womanizing main characters.”

Here’s the image often used in parodies of pulp scifi: the main character is a big-chinned, ultra-muscular dope in tights who is a compulsive womanizer and talks like Adam West in Batman. Whenever I see this, I think to myself…what exactly is it they’re making fun of?

It’s more normal than you think to find parodies of things that never actually existed. Mystery buffs and historians, for example, can’t find a single straight example of “the Butler did it.” It’s a thing people think is a thing that was never a thing, and another example would be the idea of the “silent film villain” in a mustache and top hat (which there are no straight examples of, either). There are no non-parody examples of Superman changing in a phone booth; he just never did this.

In reality, my favorite description of pulp mag era science fiction heroes is that they are “wisecracking Anglo-Saxon engineers addicted to alcohol and tobacco who like nothing better than to explain things to others that they already know.” The average pulp scifi hero had speech patterns best described as “Mid-Century American Wiseass” than like Adam West or the Lone Ranger. 

The nearest the Spaceman Spiff stereotype came to hitting the mark was with the magazine heroes of the Lensmen and Captain Future, and they’re both nowhere near close. Captain Future was a muscular hero with a chin, but he also had a Captain Picard level desire to use diplomacy first, and believed that most encounters with aliens were only hostile due to misunderstandings and lack of communication (and the story makes him right). He also didn’t seem interested in women, mostly because he had better things to do for the solar system and didn’t have the time for love. The Lensmen, on the other hand, had a ruthless, bloodthirsty streak, and were very much like the “murder machine” Brock Sampson (an attitude somewhat justified by the stakes in their struggle). 


“Pulp Era Scifi were mainly action/adventure stories with good vs. evil.” 

This is a half-truth, since, like so much other genre fiction, scifi has always been sugared up with fight scenes and chases. And there was a period, early in the century, when most scifi followed the Edgar Rice Burroughs model and were basically just Westerns or swashbucklers with different props, ray guns instead of six-shooters. But the key thing to remember is how weird so much of this scifi was, and that science fiction, starting in the mid-1930s, eventually became something other than just adventure stories with different trappings. 

One of my favorite examples of this is A. Bertram Chandler’s story, “Giant-Killer.” The story is about rats on a starship who acquire intelligence due to proximity to the star drive’s radiation, and who set about killing the human crew one by one. Another great example is Eando Binder’s Adam Link stories, told from the point of view of a robot who is held responsible for the death of his creator.

What’s more, one of the best writers to come out of this era is best known for never having truly evil bad guys: Isaac Asimov. His “Caves of Steel,” published in 1953, had no true villains. The Spacers, who we assumed were snobs, only isolated themselves because they had no immunities to the germs of earth.


“Racism was endemic to the pulps.”

It is absolutely true that the pulps reflected the unconscious views of society as a whole at the time, but as typical of history, the reality was usually much more complex than our mental image of the era. For instance, overt racism was usually shown as villainous: in most exploration magazines like Adventure, you can typically play “spot the evil asshole we’re not supposed to like” by seeing who calls the people of India “dirty monkeys” (as in Harold Lamb). 

Street & Smith, the largest of all of the pulp publishers, had a standing rule in the 1920s-1930s to never to use villains who were ethnic minorities because of the fear of spreading race hate by negative portrayals. In fact, in one known case, the villain of Resurrection Day was going to be a Japanese General, but the publisher demanded a revision and he was changed to an American criminal. Try to imagine if a modern-day TV network made a rule that minority groups were not to be depicted as gang bangers or drug dealers, for fear that this would create prejudice when people interact with minority groups in everyday life, and you can see how revolutionary this policy was. It’s a mistake to call this era very enlightened, but it’s also a mistake to say everyone born before 1970 was evil.


“Pulp scifi writers in the early days were indifferent to scientific reality and played fast and loose with science.”

 FALSE.

 This is, by an order of magnitude, the most false item on this list.

In fact, you might say that early science fiction fandom were obsessed with scientific accuracy to the point it was borderline anal retentive. Nearly every single one of the lettercols in Astounding Science Fiction were nitpickers fussing about scientific details. In fact, modern scifi fandom’s grudging tolerance for storytelling necessities like sound in space at the movies, or novels that use “hyperspace” are actually something of a step down from what the culture around scifi was in the 1920s-1950s. Part of it was due to the fact that organized scifi fandom came out of science clubs; Hugo Gernsback created the first scifi pulp magazine as a way to sell electronics and radio equipment to hobbyists, and the “First Fandom” of the 1930s were science enthusiasts who talked science first and the fiction that speculated about it second.

In retrospect, a lot of it was just plain obvious insecurity: in a new medium considered “kid’s stuff,” they wanted to show scifi was plausible, relevant, and something different from “fairy tales.” It’s the same insecure mentality that leads video gamers to repeatedly ask if games are art. You’ve got nothing to prove there, guys, calm down (and take it from a pulp scifi aficionado, the most interesting things are always done in the period when a medium is considered disposable trash). 

One of the best examples was the famous Howard P. Lovecraft, who published “The Shadow out of Time” in the 1936 issue of Astounding. Even though it might be the only thing from that issue that is even remotely reprinted today, the letters page from this issue practically rose up in revolt against this story as not being based on accurate science. Lovecraft was never published in Astounding ever again.

If you ever wanted to find out what Star Wars would be like if they were bigger hardasses about scientific plausibility, check out E.E. Smith’s Lensman series. People expect a big, bold, brassy space opera series with heroes and villains to play fast and loose, but it was shockingly scientifically grounded.

To be fair, science fiction was not a monolith on this. One of the earliest division in science fiction was between the Astounding Science Fiction writers based in New York, who often had engineering and scientific backgrounds and had left-wing (in some cases, literally Communist) politics, and the Amazing Stories writers based in the Midwest, who were usually self taught, and had right-wing, heartland politics. Because the Midwestern writers in Amazing Stories were often self-taught, they had a huge authority problem with science and played as fast and loose as you could get. While this is true, it’s worth noting science fiction fandom absolutely turned on Amazing Stories for this, especially when the writers started dabbling with spiritualism and other weirdness like the Shaver Mystery. And to this day, it’s impossible to find many Amazing Stories tales published elsewhere.

Sweet Creature

Click here if you’d like to listen to the song to help set the mood. x

It was one of those days.

Harry adored his job. He really did. His work was his first love, he always said. But there were certainly days where it all got to be a little too much.

He woke up at six in the morning to be greeted by a rainy and foggy sky outside. He spent a good ten minutes gazing at the great love of his life, her hair splayed in all different directions from having forgotten to tie it up in a ponytail like she usually did. Her lips were slightly parted, and her eyes were still puffy from the night before. He exhaled a sigh at the memory of it—it was the first time they’d really fought in a little while, but it’d been a doozy. Exhaustion took it’s toll on the both of them, but they were both too stubborn to admit it. It had been over something petty that he wasn’t even angry about anymore, even though at the moment in all seemed so important. And even though they tried to never go to bed angry, their tired eyes beat out the need to make up.

He exhaled a soft sigh as he watched his love, and he could see the tension built up in her features still from last night. He didn’t want to wake her just yet, because he knew that she would not love being woken up at six in the morning if she didn’t need to get up. The two of them rarely ever got a good night’s sleep anymore, and he didn’t want to take away her rest.

He got himself out of bed and walked over to the bathroom, going about his morning routine as quietly as possible as to not wake his girls. Within half an hour he was dressed up in a pair of black jeans and one of his button-ups. Usually he wouldn’t get so dolled up to go out this early, but he had a few morning radio shows he was making a live guest appearance on and impressions mattered to him. Having decided to get breakfast on the way to work, he quickly slipped out of the house without making a sound.

The rest of the day didn’t get any better.

Keep reading

damn the delivery boy.

Pairing: Jeon Jeongguk / Reader.

Genre: Expecting Parents AU / Fluff and Non-explicit smut.

Summary: Jeon Jeongguk is a computer science major working as a pizza delivery boy, and you are an uninspired published author who has just started an art degree. When you realise that the delivery boy is your old high school crush, he keeps coming back, but with more to offer than just puff pastry and vegetarian supreme. Though little did he know that he would end up giving you something much more that flips both of your worlds completely upside down in the form of two blue lines and nine months.

Count: 9,656 words.


month one.

Two lines.

The second is a little faint, but it is there, undeniably there, growing stronger by the second as your heart sinks deeper into the pit of your stomach and suddenly you are keeling over the sink, throwing up a combination of panic and regret. You wipe your mouth, sit back on the closed lid of the toilet, shut your eyes and take a deep breath, holding it until your lungs burn and your lashes fly back apart to look at the test still shaking between your fingertips.

There, right before your eyes, two fucking blue lines protruding like two middle fingers, poking up at you and saying – Congratulations sucker, you are pregnant!

Twenty-three years old and pregnant.

You throw up again.

This has got to be the biggest mistake of your life.

Keep reading

4

So, I thought to myself… What if Sherlock and John make TIME’s “most influential” list?

And then, as always, I got a bit carried away.

Above is the cover and article, as well as a bonus cover for another article/issue. 

I’m not going to write “The Final Problem,” but my thinking is that after everything happens with Moriarty and Mary etc. (a.k.a. I have my own thoughts about it that aren’t what we were shown in series 4), John writes an article like a blog post but publishes it as a TIME exclusive in January. He and Sherlock both decide the public deserves the truth, and neither of them wants to do interviews or entrust the story to anyone else. So John just sets the record straight once and for all, and that’s the cover of the issue. Oh, and Kitty Riley edits it… because her false stories about Sherlock catapulted her to fame, and they figure it’s only fitting that she help tell their truths–and she’s willing.

In my head, that article is a few pages and would be laid out with documents, footage stills, etc., so I don’t foresee myself writing or creating it anytime soon. But if I get hit with enough inspiration, perhaps I shall give it a go.

The AO3 link below includes the above graphics, the accompanying fic, Mycroft’s article typed out within it for easier reading, and a blog post by John in both graphic and textual form.

Enjoy :)

RT on Twitter here.

Because some asked why I needed Truthwitch to break out...

Some people have asked me what I meant by a statement in my postmortem – about WHY I needed Truthwitch to break out (because if it didn’t, my career was over). I’m not sure how in-depth I’ve been in my newsletter, so here’s an answer for you:

Basically, my first series tanked. I mean…tanked. We’re talking, Truthwitch sold more copies in its first two weeks than the entire SS&D series COMBINED.

Bad sales hurt an author – you’re way better off as an untested debut than an author with shitty sales. So I was at a crossroads in my career, where the plan was to change my name. That way, I could be a “debut” again. (Sadly, this happens a LOT in the industry. Which is why please do not pirate our books!)

But then Tor decided to take a chance on me. Because they’re a small (and amazing) house, they have more room to take on projects that they’re passionate about (instead of just commercially successful). HOWEVER, if Truthwitch didn’t sell well…. Then yeah. That was it. “Susan Dennard” would be dead, and I’d have to reinvent/start over my career.

There’s no shame in that. I was totally willing to reinvent! The problem was that I had this great audience for my writing advice – thousands upon thousands of people who were coming back for my blog and newsletter. Yet none of them were buying my books. Which is fine – I don’t give free writing help to sell copies. I do it because I love doing it.

BUT…if I reinvented myself, I would lose what little crossover I had between writing-advice-fans and book-readers – not to mention the handful of amazing fans who did like the SS&D trilogy (I will never ever forget my wonderful Misfits!).

So…I needed + desperately wanted Truthwitch to sell well. I wanted Tor to be happy. I wanted to keep my name. That led to me going “all in” on self-promo.

Full disclosure: I allocated $15,000 of my advance to promote Truthwitch. (Which, in case you’re wondering, was most of the advance.) I ended up going over that amount…by a lot. Costs ranged from travel to important events (this was really where the bulk got eaten up!) to running/maintaining my street team (swag, postage, hiring an assistant to help me keep it going) to learning how to + making my own book trailer.***

And like…I honestly don’t even know what kind of TIME I spent promoting. It was a lot more than I thought it would be. Literally most of 2015.

But…it paid off, right? At least in terms of “success.” I’m a New York Times Bestseller now!!

That said, I haven’t earned back the money I spent yet (“bestseller” doesn’t automatically mean “rich”), and I will never get back the time I spent. Plus, the nightmare that was 2016 as I tried to rush-create Windwitch

It begs the question: were the costs worth the rewards? I don’t know. I think so since, hopefully, the rewards will continue to pay forward for a long time – and my career is definitely growing!

Best of all, though, I CAN KEEP MY NAME. Susan Dennard. C’est moi pour toujours. ❤️

Edit:

I want to add two more things – because this post has opened up a lot of conversations I wasn’t expecting to have (but welcome!!).

First: I cannot emphasize enough just how important LUCK is in this equation. On top of the time, money, publisher-partnership, and salty desperation that I poured into Truthwitch, I ALSO GOT LUCKY. I had the Right Book at the Right Moment with the Right Cover in the Right Genre coming out in the Right Month.

A publisher can pour all the money in the world into a book, but nothing will make readers buy it. There is no predicting trends.

So a lot of the success of Truthwitch (which is still pretty small, relatively speaking. I’m not a Big Author by any means!!) boils down to that intangible, finicky sprite known as Lady Luck.

Second: This is just ROUND ONE of “reinvention.” I have no illusions or expectations that my success will remain. The Witchlands series has already exceeded my wildest hopes, but no author stays “on top” forever. It’s a constant up and down, and frankly, we’re all just really lucky to even be able to share our words in the first place.

Sure, I’d love to be successful forever, but it’s not my primary dream – and definitely not my expectation. Realism is key to longevity in this industry, and more than that: gratitude.

So on that note: thanks for reading, thanks for sharing, and thanks for being the reason I keep writing.


***Note: I need to also mention that, once it was clear my own self-promotion was starting to pick up momentum, Tor really stepped in and helped me. This was not a solo journey, and it NEVER is. I had/have an amazing team, and we’ve forged a real partnership while getting the Witchlands into readers’ hands.

Some thoughts I’ve been mulling over for a while...

SJM Haters: “No diversity!” *Shoving aside canonically black High Lords Tarquin and the bisexual Helion, Thesan, Nesryn, all of the Southern Continent, etc*

SJM Haters: “Everyone is white!” *Punching the non-white Illyrian races, not to mention about 90% of the Summer Court*

SJM Haters: “They’re all heterosexual!” *Throws Thesan, Mor, Aedion, the Blackbeak Matron, Thea and Kaya off of a cliff* (Actually, feel free to throw the Matron off a cliff lmao)

SJM Haters: “Rowan is abusive” *blatantly ignores the fact that Rowan was literally tied to a queen who forced him to do terrible things, and he still found it in himself to love Aelin unconditionally*

SJM Haters: “She doesn’t tackle any important issues!” *Stepping on Rhysand’s history of sexual abuse, not to mention Lysandra’s history of sexual abuse, oh and also Aedion, whose nickname was literally ‘Adarlan’s Whore,’ and the slave trade, and the treatment of ‘lesser faeries’ in comparison to ‘High Fae.’*

I’m not trying to say that the ACOTAR/TOG books aren’t without their flaws. Every book, every movie, every song, every piece of artwork that has ever been created has a flaw in some way. Often, there are multiple flaws. It is okay to acknowledge these flaws. It is okay to even criticize them. What is not okay is discrediting the immense amount of work that SJM puts into these books. She released two (2) fantasy novels longer than 200,000 words in a single year. I don’t pretend to know everything that goes on at Bloomsbury Publishing, but I honestly believe that she did that for her fans. She started writing Throne of Glass when she was 16; she got it published 11 years later. Books take time; lots of it. Ask George RR Martin, who also tackles the heavy genre of fantasy, but he’s been working on Winds of Winter for six years. Do you think SJM would have wanted to go over these books for another year or combed through them just one more time before she published them? Yeah, probably. Every author, writer, fanfiction writer, artist, or whomever, wants just a bit more time to add those final details, to keep chipping away (because let me tell you, even when it’s done, we don’t feel like it’s done). But you know what else? She’s probably damn proud of them, too. As well she should be. The amount of times I find myself laughing with these characters and crying and screeching, it says enough. 

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Reasons to Keep Writing

everyone starts small. just because you’re not big now, doesn’t mean you’ll never be. and if you’re just starting out, keep in mind those bigger blogs have been writing for much longer than you. building a following takes time. 

there will always be someone who enjoys your writing. every like, reblog, and comment is one person who enjoyed what you wrote and i can assure you they want more! and remember, not everyone remembers to leave evidence that they liked your writing or they might just be too nervous to interact with you. invisible fans exist, and you’ve got them.

going along with that last one, your writing has the potential to help others! you could write about a minority, or maybe you could publish a little something comforting at the exact time someone else needs it. and most of the time, when you affect someone like this they’ll tell you, whether it be through tags, or a private message or whatever. that’s an amazing feeling.

getting a compliment from someone becomes a sure-fire way to make your day better. nothing feels greater than seeing a comment from someone saying how much they love something you worked hard on. maybe write down these comments somewhere, so you can look at them when you’re feeling negative about your skills as a writer.  

writer’s block is not the end of your writing career. it sure feels like it sometimes, but everyone, even the popular writers you look up to, suffer from writer’s block. everyone puts out work they’re not 100% satisfied with sometimes, and that’s okay! when you get out of this slump, your writing will be better than ever before and you’ll enjoy it again. keep writing through a block so you can get there sooner.

These are the things I think about when I feel bad about my writing, so I hope they can help someone else too.

I haven’t seen alot about this immense flaw in Exclusionist rhetoric so I’m just gonna write;

Practically every exclusionist I’ve ever seen has suffered from a very nasty case of “omniscience”

Ya’ll literally think you know everything in the world.

Like how their favorite thing to claim is that “modern society is okay with a-specs, aphobia doesn’t exist” like

How do you… know??

Aren’t most of ya’ll LGBT?? You guys arent exactly a part of “Straight Society”

I find it hard to believe that you spend your free time going around and asking homophobic straight people their opinions on aros and aces.

Your viewpoint on this pretty much comes from “I personally haven’t witnessed or observed any anti-aspec actions in the small personal bubble I call my world”, which is the same ridiculous “if I don’t see it it’s not real” viewpoint that climate change deniers use.

And instead of being like “Wait a minute, I don’t know everything, it’s entirely possible that Aphobia is far far more common than I believe it is, the fact that aces and aros aren’t being hunted down like animals right in front of me doesn’t actually mean anything”, Ya’ll went and found a bunch of people with the same viewpoint and went “Oh well, herd mentality, if we all think the same, we must be right!”

And then it’s like, what do you base this “no oppression” thing on?? Did ya’ll just google “what laws oppress aceys” and when you got nothing, started screaming that Aphobia isn’t real??

Or is it that you aren’t seeing articles about violence against a-spec’s? Because every time a minority member gets attacked, they report it, straight away, and it always gets published in a big news story!! #Sarcasm

And then because of these preconceived notions, your bias allows you to reject every personal story about aphobia that crosses your dash.

I’ve literally told an Exclusionist that my partner, who is gay and trans, was physically assaulted for being Ace, and they went “Are you SURE it wasn’t because they were gay and trans?”

Like ?????? Yes I’m fucking sure???

Holy shit.

amazon.com
Someone Else's Stars

Hey! Are you sick of books about gay teens written by straight adults?
Are you sick of books about mental illness by neurotypicals where it “all gets better”???
well look here!!! I’m a gay mentally ill teen in North Carolina who wrote this around the time HB2 was passed and got it published! It takes place in the 1950s in NYC and there’s not a single straight character. Please help support my writing and even just reblog it :-)

The Best (and worst) Ways to Save on Textbooks!

After I posted my overrated first year advice post, a lot of people were commenting on my advice about buying textbooks. I agreed so much with all of these comments, so I thought I would do a more comprehensive post about how I buy my textbooks and what I recommend for others. 

Disclaimer: Obviously, where you buy your textbooks can be influenced by so many factors (location, income, etc.) so don’t feel obliged to listen to all of this advice! It is just my opinion, and as always, different things work for different people. 

Go Ahead

  • Buy used from upper year students. This is my number one go to way to save money on textbooks. Meeting with an upper year and buying a book is reliable and just makes sense. Also, they aren’t trying to turn a profit, so it is often the best deal. 
  • Bargain with people who are selling. If you do decide to buy from an upper year, try to bargain with them to get the best possible deal. Often times they are just trying to get rid of the books, so if you offer to bundle them, they will give you a better price. 
  • Buy off of Amazon Prime, or another reputable seller. If you can get a better deal and the guarantee that your books will arrive within 2-3 days, why not? 
  • Buy the looseleaf edition and a binder, rather than the hardcover copy. I have seen books at my bookstore that are $300+ and the looseleaf copy is like $100. It is the exact same material in every way, except that it isn’t bound together, so it is definitely worth the money saved. 
  • If there is an electronic copy available, print it yourself. Make sure you have the rights to print it first, but if you do, then this is a great way to save. My politics prof made all of our readings available online to download, and I got them all printed for $9. Much cheaper than an actual textbook. 
  • Rent textbooks. I have to be honest, I don’t know a ton about renting, but there are usually websites and places on/around campus that let you rent a textbook and then return it at the end. Just make sure that it is considerably cheaper than owning the book. 
  • Share the book with a friend. If you know someone on your floor or someone you hang out with often, share the book! Make a schedule of when each of you will get it, and you only have to pay half of the cost. 

Proceed With Caution

  • Buying an electronic copy. This is a great way to save, as long as you are comfortable doing a lot of reading online. I definitely recommend this if you have a tablet, or are just used to reading online. If you like to take notes in a book, or you get a headache from reading online, it might be worth it to find a hard copy. 
  • Buying online from an unreliable site. This might apply more for my fellow Canadians/non-Americans because fewer sites offer good, quick shipping to us! I remember when I was looking for textbooks, I would think I found an amazing deal on a book, then see that it would take 6 weeks to ship. It isn’t worth it to be 6 weeks behind on readings to save a bit of cash. 
  • Buying from a bookstore off campus. I guess it depends on how willing your school is to screw you over, but at my school, the on-campus prices are the same as at Chapters. If they are the same price anyways, you might as well go for the convenience of the on-campus store. 
  • Checking it out from the library. I think this is a great idea if it is a light reading class, especially because textbooks are often on reserve at the library. However, if you have readings every night or a big project based on the textbook, it can be super inconvenient to have to check the book out every day. 
  • Buying an older edition of a textbook. I see this advice all the time, and I just don’t think it is good at all! It is very annoying that publishers do this, but usually a new edition is completely rearranged, and can often have different content and different homework questions. I made this mistake at the beginning of the year and got a book that had literally nothing in common with the class, so I ended up buying the new edition anyways. 

Other Ways to Save 

  • Make sure you actually need the book before purchasing. Look on the syllabus — not just under “required textbooks” but also under the course schedule. If there is only one reading from the textbook, try to borrow it from a friend or use the online version. 
  • If there is a reader, try to find the readings online. Sometimes profs will try to sell you a reader that has a bunch of readings from various sources. Often these are super popular readings like John Rawls or Judith Butler that can be easily accessed online. If you can find copies of them all of JSTOR or your school library, don’t bother with the reader. 
  • Take good care of textbooks that you buy so you can sell them next year. If you write and highlight in the book, it is harder to sell for a good price. If it is pristine condition, you can sell it for a bit less than the cover price rather than super cheap. 
  • It is a lot better to sell books to other students than to sell to the bookstore/online. If a textbook costs $50 new, you can sell it to another student for $40, whereas the bookstore would only pay you like $4.50. They really lowball you, so try to sell directly to other students! 
An Unconventional Hiveswap Dev Team Interview

Hey, it’s Cohen. Ash, our Associate Producer who usually runs these, is at E3 this week, so I’m doing the introduction. There was also a weird Affable Karkat vibe when he was answering this own questions, so I rewrote them a little. Here goes:

Obviously people sorta know you if they’ve been reading these interviews, but for the sake of the thing: What’s your name, and what do you do on the Hiveswap team?

Hello there! My name is Ash Paulsen, and I’m the Associate Producer on Hiveswap. As a producer, my basic role on the project is to help organize and sync up each department’s workflow while also facilitating effective interdepartmental communication. In layman’s terms: it’s my job to make everyone else’s jobs easier and do all the “in-between” stuff to help bring the game to the finish line, and that means I do whatever needs doing – which can vary from day to day!

How’d you get your start on Hiveswap?

This is actually a surprisingly straightforward story. Basically, What Pumpkin was looking to fill a producer position on Hiveswap, and luckily they were pointed in my direction by a mutual friend and colleague. So What Pumpkin then reached out to me via email, and I happened to be looking to take the next step in my career at the time. I then began a brief trial period as a part-time producer on Hiveswap to ascertain if the position would be an ideal fit for me. After a while, I was very graciously welcomed into the What Pumpkin family as a full-time producer – I must have impressed them somewhere along the way, and I’m happy I did!

Yeah, absolutely. Having a dedicated person for the work you’ve been doing has made my life easier. You’ve got some experience in 2D animation and video game production specifically, right?

My first production-related job came by way of Nickelodeon Animation several years ago, where I worked for about a year and a half as a Production Assistant on the Butch Hartman cartoons The Fairly OddParents! and T.U.F.F. Puppy. (Prior to that, I’d been working as a Game Master at Nexon – the developer of MapleStory – so this was a huge jump!) I later left Nickelodeon for a full-time position as the Senior Editor at UDON Entertainment, a publisher and art collective specializing in video game and anime art books. Somewhere along the way, I ended up taking on a second gig as an Associate Producer at ShiftyLook, where I got to help make super cool webcomics and web cartoons out of old-school, dormant Bandai Namco Games IPs, such as Bravoman and Wonder Momo.

It was that ShiftyLook job that reminded me just how much I loved producing and wanted to get back into it, so I put some feelers out there and when I was lucky enough to have What Pumpkin come knocking, I was ready to seize the opportunity!

Do you have any advice for someone looking to get into production? I don’t mean me, of course–it wasn’t until we brought you on that I realized how much production work I’d been doing as a matter of necessity, and I don’t want to go back to that life–but just, y’know. Tips and tricks for any aspiring producers.

In terms of advice for launching into a production career, I would say that a self-starter mentality and an honest willingness to take on pretty much any task – no matter how boring or menial – are key. I find that’s the best way to let people know you’re a team player and, in turn, get noticed! If something needs doing, just step up and do it! If you don’t know how to do it, ask questions, but do it nonetheless.

Yeah, including, when you’re not at E3, running these interviews. Speaking of, do you have any favorite games?

For someone who plays as many video games as I do – I’ve been an avid gamer since the original Super Mario Bros. captured my heart when I was just five years old – this is a surprisingly easy answer! My favorite game of all time is Chrono Trigger, a Super Nintendo JRPG you’ve probably heard of once or twice. That game is the total package: a gripping story, memorable characters, killer battle system, legendary soundtrack, and some of the Super Nintendo’s very best graphics. I think my favorite thing about Chrono Trigger is that the narrative can be as complex or as light as you want it to be; if you want to enjoy it as a simple time-traveling romp, you can do that and it’s great. But if you want to read between the lines and really dive into the lore where things get pretty dark and sophisticated, you can play it that way too and it’s even better in my opinion. It’s a game you can enjoy on your own terms, and for that reason and so many more, I just adore CT. My second and third favorites behind that are Okami and The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker.

I just recently finished the Switch versions of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, Blaster Master Zero, and Wonder Boy: The Dragon’s Trap, and right now I’m playing Horizon: Zero Dawn and Mario Kart 8 Deluxe. Looking ahead, I am unbelievably, ridiculously hyped for Sonic Mania and Kingdom Hearts III!

Do you pull any inspiration from those for your production work on Hiveswap?

Not in particular… I can’t think of much crossover between gaming and production work, either in terms of the skills required or really at all. I suppose there’s some tenuous connection between, like, turn-based strategy RPGs and project management, but even that’s reaching a bit.

Besides, working on Hiveswap is its own form of inspiration: I have the privilege of working with a team of wildly talented, creative folks on a daily basis, and when you’re surrounded by that much awesome every day, it’s hard not to be inspired to work harder and smarter!

Since this is a remote team, we’ve had people describe their workstations, which has been fun. What’s yours like?

I don’t really have a particular workstation, if that makes sense. Mine is mostly the kind of work that can be done anywhere as long as I have my laptop (I run with a MacBook Pro) and an Internet connection, so my workstation is generally wherever I want or need to be that day. Oftentimes that means a local coffee shop because I don’t fancy staying cooped up in my apartment alone every day, but if I have a full day of meetings I’ll usually stay home. The same ambient noise I go to coffee shops to enjoy tends to become a major liability when people are trying to hear you in a Google Hangout or Skype meeting!

Yeah, I can confirm that, having been in those meetings before you started staying home for them. What about music? Do you like to listen to anything while you’re working?

I constantly listen to music while I work – lots and lots of video game music! Game music has been my jam since I started burning line-out recordings of sound test menus to CDRs as a kid. (Not even kidding. The ‘90s, baby!) Usually it’s upbeat, driving chiptune anthems like the sort you hear in Mega Man games and other retro platformers like Shovel Knight, but I also love orchestral VGM like Final Fantasy  soundtracks. In fact, Yoko Shimomura – composer of the Kingdom Hearts games, among so many others – is my favorite musician of all time! I also listen to original chip music and a ton of EDM (electronic dance music, which encompasses so many other sub-genres) as well. I’ll give anything a chance, really!

Anything else you want to say to fans?

I’m genuinely appreciative of and humbled by the opportunity to leave my stamp on a universe as singularly compelling and bizarre as Homestuck. Despite my being a relative newcomer to the project and the wider Homestuck community, bringing Hiveswap to the finish line in a form that delivers on your expectations means the world to me and I take my role in that process very seriously. I’m really, really happy to be here!

Is there anywhere people can see more of your work?

As I touched on briefly earlier, I’m one of the GameXplain crew! If you’ve not heard of us, we’re a Nintendo-focused YouTube channel closing in on 800,000 (!) subscribers, though we also cover PlayStation and Xbox titles when time allows. You can find a link to our channel right here, where you’ll hear me yapping away in all sorts of discussions, previews, reviews, news updates, and more!

We’ll have Ash and the regular format back next week.

about the second wave of spam

remember last time this happened and the band denied being involved in the spam? they just posted this to their tumblr. (8/25/17)

http://crosa-rosa.tumblr.com/post/164607245186/
(the post reads “Hello again.”)

posting this as spamming began again essentially proves that the band is directly involved and this is a publicity stunt.
(even if they somehow aren’t involved, responding to this second wave of spam with a cryptic text post is ridiculous and unprofessional)

furthermore, the fact that this specific band has been spammed in submissions twice now is unlikely to be a coincidence, especially considering the attention they got last time.

DO NOT publish the submission. DO NOT click on the video, it only rewards this childish stunt with youtube views. just delete it and move on

Dog owners often say the best thing about dogs is their unconditional love.

But new research suggests there’s another benefit, too. Dog owners walk more.

In a study published Monday in the journal BMC Public Health, dog owners on average walked 22 minutes more per day compared to people who didn’t own a dog.

And they weren’t just dawdling.

“Not only did we see an increase in exercise, but also the exercise was at a moderate pace,” explains study author Daniel Mills of the University of Lincoln, in the United Kingdom.

The study found that the dog owners walked briskly and got their heart rates up. At times, their pace was about 3 miles per hour, which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers moderate intensity.

Dog Owners Walk 22 Minutes More Per Day. And Yes, It Counts As Exercise

Photo: fotografixx/Getty Images

My dear lgbt+ kids,

I decided to cut FAQ Friday short this week and closed the inbox earlier than originally planned, and I want to share my thoughts about that decision with you - not because my little FAQ thingy is so important but because I believe it serves as a reminder to take care of ourselves.

As many of you know, I open the inbox each Friday and answer as many questions as I can until the next Friday. The overwhelming majority of people who send me a message ask for advice - but, of course, occasionally there are people who use that opportunity to tell me how awful I am, how much they hate my blog.

That’s fair. Nobody is required to enjoy my content or think of me as a sympathetic person. Even people who enjoy lgbt+ content do not necessarily enjoy the rather cutesy “vibe” of my blog. 

Just as they are not required to like my letters, I’m not required to publish or answer messages along the lines of “I hate you and your ugly”. My usual course of action is to simply delete them. I know that there will a couple of these each time I open the inbox and I can handle that without it getting to me too much. 

This week, it got to me. 

Maybe it was because the insults were more, let’s say, “creative” than usual. Maybe it was because there were more of them than usual. Maybe it was simply because I had a pretty rough week in my private life. Regardless of why, I felt hurt. They made me feel sad. 

And that’s okay. I’m a human being. 

The fact that I am lgbt+ and openly talk about it does not mean I have to be immune to hate. It does not mean I have to patiently educate people why it’s not very nice to call me a freak or have to find some scientific source that proves that it is indeed not cool to tell me to go kill myself. 

Educating, spreading awareness, discussing, all that is important. But sometimes, you have to step back and say “Okay, this hurts. I’ll need a break to make this stop hurting.” 

And that’s okay. We are human beings. 

With all my love, 

Your Tumblr Mom 

Hotel California Chapter 2: You do What?

Dean Winchester x Reader

1400 Words

Story Summary: After an unfortunate incident at work, you take a couple of days for yourself, planning on staying at the nice restaurant at the edge of town. There you meet a handsome green eyed man who comes to your rescue when you’re visited by a ghost.

Catch Up Here: Masterpost

You didn’t pay any attention to the fact that you were loosely wrapped up in a towel, it being the only thing covering you up from Dean’s view. You were too busy launching yourself into his arms, your heart still pounding from your scare.

You hastily noticed he was still dressed in the same jeans and flannel, before you pressed your head tightly to his chest, relieved to feel his arms tighten around you. You felt his head move back and forth, before he whispered into your ear. “Sweetheart, not that I mind having you wet and almost naked in my arms, but maybe the hallway isn’t the best place.”

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Heartlines Part III: Oh, wish you were here

Summary: Y/N is dead and she left three soul mates lost in their life. 
Word Count: 8040 
Pairings: Clark Kent x Reader, Barry Allen x Reader, Bruce Wayne x Reader.
WARNINGS: LOTS OF ANGST, swearing, making something against someone’s will (don’t know if that counts as a warning, but just in case)
A/N: Sooo sorry for keeping you waiting, but ‘Good things come for those who wait!’ and here you have a little over EIGHT THOUSAND WORDS. I’m so proud of myself. ENJOY THE ANGST, DEARIES!

Part I   Part II   Part IV

GIFS ARE NOT MINE


“No chance there”.

Clark couldn’t keep your voice out of his head, just repeating time after time:

“No chance there”

You didn’t trust him, you didn’t think he would be there, you lost the faith you once had on him… and it hurt like hell to know that you were right to lose your faith in him. The video of your torturing and… eventual death had really affected him. When he saw your death… he couldn’t stop crying because he had saved thousands of unimportant girls falling off buildings but he wasn’t there to save you, the love of his life, his true soulmate.

He loved you and that was so clear at the beginning of your relationship, he just couldn’t understand how it stopped to be clear. He used to show you much he adored you, how much he loved you… until Lois appeared. He didn’t blame Lois, of course he didn’t; he blamed himself.

You were a miracle, that much he always knew. He used to think that he would never find his soulmate in this world since he was from another one; no matter how much Martha had insisted on how the color of the heartline clearly stated that his soulmate was alive, he didn’t believe it. He thought he was condemned to be alone for the rest of his life, until you came into the picture. One day you just fell in the middle of the street and no one but him, offered to help you get all of your papers back into their folders.

“Thanks” you smiled to him when he gave you the last folder.
“No problem, miss” he answered with a smile, too.
“I’m on a bit of a rush now, but I feel like I should really give you something in exchange for your help, so would you like to go get a cup of coffee sometime?” you mumbled this under your breath, afraid of him rejecting you… but there was no way in hell he could reject someone as cute as you.
“Although I don’t think you need to thank me anymore, I would love to have a cup of coffee” he smiled, hearing to your heartbeat going faster.
“Oh!” you answered surprised and then smiled the way he would soon just love “Well, the name is Y/N and…” you said while placing down all of your papers carefully just to take a blank sheet of paper “Do you have something to write with?” you asked and he desperately searched in his pockets for his pen, to finally give it to you when he found it a minute later “Thanks!” you said whilst you scribbled something down on the paper. When you finished, you gave him both the paper and the pen. He took them a little bit confused and watched you as you took your folders from the floor “And that is my phone number… um, sorry, but what’s your name again?” you asked a little embarrassed. He found you to be extremely fascinating.
“Clark, my name’s Clark Kent” he stretched his hand as a reflex.
“It’s a pleasure to meet you Clark” you said while grabbing his hand.
The moment your hand touched his, you both felt like an electric current going down your bodies. You both looked down to your laced hands and saw how one of your heartlines from your right hand illuminated, while his left one shined as bright as yours.
“Seems like the pleasure is all mine, Y/N” he smiled, still holding your hand.
“It also seems like that coffee is going to be moved to right now” you answered with a glint in your eyes.
“I thought you were in a hurry?”
“I was just going to meet my publisher, no big deal. We can meet tomorrow after I learned everything about my new found soulmate” your smile was making his heart jump.
“I would love to tell you everything about me, if you correspond” he said being a little flirty. In reality, he would wait a couple of months to tell you his secret. After all, he wouldn’t want to scare you.  
“You just got yourself a deal” you winked at him while grabbing your phone to tell your publisher you wouldn’t make it.

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