google-london

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We love it when people find inventive uses for Google Street View (previously featured here). Artist Halley Docherty turned Google Street View into a time machine by taking paintings of London created in the 18th and 19th century and superimposing them over Street View images of the precise locations depicted in those old paintings. It’s as though contemporary locations, from river views and park trails to landmarks, intersections and street scenes, have opened themselves to reveal their own memories of how they looked and who was there many years ago.

"This is not the first time Docherty has created a merging of past and present. Other projects have included collages of present-day settings with classic album covers and another featured juxtapositions with photos from World War I. Docherty’s series help to reveal the aesthetic flavor and wide-ranging eye of Street View.”

Click here to learn more about these pieces and view more of Halley Docherty’s fascinating London paintings project.

[via Architizer]

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Halley Docherty aka Shystone (UK) - 18th-century London paintings meet Google Street View

In a fine example of the changing faces of a city and the ways we document our surroundings, Halley Docherty aka Shystone has taken 18th and 19th-century paintings of London and superimposed them on to present-day Google Street View screenshots, making a collage of London then and now. Originally commissioned by Guardian Cities, artist’s latest collages remixed some well known historical paintings of city scenes around the world, from Istanbul to Saint Petersburg and Tokyo to New York, superimposed on to Google Street View. Shystone’s work offers a fascinating reminder that we are always living among the past. (src. Guardian Cities & My Modern Metropolis)

[more Halley Docherty aka Shystone | artist found at jaiblog]

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18th-century London paintings meet Google Street View by shystone | via

In a fine example of the changing faces of a city and the ways we document our surroundings, shystone has taken 18th and 19th-century paintings of London and superimposed them on to present-day Google Street View screenshots, making a collage of London then and now.

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"Harry wished he had eight more eyes… There were shops selling robes, shops selling telescopes and strange silver instruments Harry had never seen before, windows stacked with barrels of bat spleens and eels’ eyes, tottering piles of spell books, quills, and rolls of parchment, potion bottles, globes of the moon…."

—J. K. Rowling, from Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone

Attention muggles, something awesome has happened! Google Maps will now let you explore the wonders of Diagon Alley. You no longer have to be a wizard to visit places like Ollivanders Wand Shop or Weasleys’ Wizard Wheezes. Google Street View traveled to the set of Diagon Alley at the Warner Bros. Studio Tour in London.

Click here to start exploring.

[via Design Taxi]

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The GIF Artists World Map presents: 

Artist: Tom Bunker
From: London, UK
Tumblr: tombunker.tumblr.com

The GIF Artists World Map is a project by Alessandro Scali | OKKULT Motion Pictures. Want to help me to add infos/improve this map? Have you found mistakes? Write me at lssndrscl@gmail.com or info@okkul.lt. 

P.S. Check out The Giphoscope Award! Coming soon! 

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January 15th 1759: British Museum opens

On this day in 1759, the British Museum was first opened to the public in London. The museum was based on the collections left to the nation by physician and naturalist Sir Hans Sloane who intended for his possessions to be put on public view. Parliament established the British Museum in June 1753. The collection was housed in a 17th century mansion called Montagu House in Bloomsbury. The original items included items from Aztec Mexico, Ancient Egypt and Japan. The most popular items were the Egyptian mummies. The British Museum is still a major attraction in London with its sizeable collection of artefacts from around the world.

255 years ago today

Check out today’s Google Doodle celebrating the Museum!