4

An old bookshop with rare and ancient books and an “Anthology of Wild Ducks” in the window… I’m sure you understand I had to take a look inside.

The old bookseller is a living cliché: tweed trousers, a jacket on a wool sweater and, of course, spectacles. But this one seemed happy to sell me four books.

I honestly can’t decide if I identify with Crowley or Aziraphale more because.  On one hand I too am a neurotic mess that raises houseplants and worries too much about being cool and constantly fucks up but wants people to love me.  And on the other hand, I too am testy and wish humans would leave me alone so I could read and love food so much I would be willing to try and stop the apocalypse so I could continue eating.

Happy Little Translation Error?

So I lent my friend my mainland Chinese copy of Good Omens, and she’s been commenting on various stuff in the book to me as she read along. One day she messaged, “Crowley’s so cute, chasing after the hedgehogs like that.”

And I said, “……………..what?????!?”

So she told me where in the book it was, and it was the part after Cr&Az realized that Warlock isn’t the kid, talked to the nun, and got out of the hospital. It did say that Crowley was “trying to hit a hedgehog and missing”, but I soon realized that the “second line” she told me that’s about the hedgehog is, “The angel stared out at the rushing hedgerows.” Apparently the Chinese translator read “hedgerows” and thought it was “hedgehogs” again. Obviously it didn’t make a huge change to the plot line, but basically, in the Chinese version of Good Omens, Crowley chased a hedgehog while convincing Aziraphale, “drove in silence for a while”, and then chatted with Aziraphale some more. Meanwhile Aziraphale saw everything but decided to let Crowley do his thing.

So…yeah.

“It’s Terry,” said Terry. “‘Ere. That [story] you sent me. Are you doing anything with it?”
“Not really.”
“Well, I think I know what happens next. Do you want to sell it to me? Or write it together?”
“Write it together,” I said, because I was not stupid, and because that was the nearest I was ever going to get to Michaelangelo phoning to ask if I wanted to paint a ceiling with him.
—  Neil Gaiman, on how he came to co-write “Good Omens” with Terry Pratchett