good asian

My opinion of BTS preforming at AMAs

As an Asian, all I can say is that I’m extremely proud to have BTS represent kpop at the AMAs. I grew up with Jackie Chan as my only Asian representation. I remember being offended when someone would call me Jackie Chan as a kid. (which I shouldn’t, Jackie Chan is awesome) I grew up believing that being called Asian is an insult. Now that I’m older, I’m proud of my race, and I’m happy that BTS was able to become an asian representative tonight. What BTS did tonight, opened many new doors for future asian artists. Obviously, some people may not be pleased that it was BTS, but all I have to say to that is- be grateful! It’s extremely hard for any asian to break into the american industry so when one does, GOOD! Asian have always been seen as a joke, or trend, and that’s not going to change overnight. This is just the beginning, when Psy became popular, I’m sure not many people were expecting any other kpop group to come to america, but it happened. Psy opened that door for bts, and now bts is doing the same for the next generation. The fact that we are able to have an asian artist become more know for their musical talents, does it really matter who they are? Expecially when they’re truly trying to make a difference for our generation? With each asian artist walking through those doors, the more chances they have to be able to show their real talents. BTS is the first kpop group to preform at AMAs and they’ll definetly not be the only or last.

Originally posted by samwol

I will never understand kpop fans who think American/Western success is more important than success in Asia when

1) Asia holds most of the world’s population

2) You’re fans of Asian artists and yet you feel as though validation from non-Asian listeners is more important than validation from Asian listeners

before we begin explaining actual myths, we’d like to address a few misconceptions, or rather myth-conceptions:

first: contrary to popular belief, hinduism is not a polytheistic religion (polytheistic meaning believing in multiple gods), but rather a monotheistic one. yes, there are several gods we reference (i.e.: brahma, vishnu, shiva, etc.) but if western writers actually bothered to properly research, they would find that some denominations of hindus believe that all of these gods are merely forms/manifestations of the Supreme Deity, Parameshwara, and that everything in the universe i also a manifestation of him/them. this does not, however, take away from the significance of other deities.

second: the syllable aum (om) is not merely something you say while standing in the tree pose, but also the most sacred sound of both hinduism and some forms of buddhism (which originated from hinduism) and represents the complete creation of brahma and by extension, Parameshwara. that is to say: the sound aum is the frequency of the universe.

third: karma, pronounced [karma] and not [KARma] is the record of everything you’ve done in your life, the good, the bad, and the ugly. it dictates what happens to you after your life is over not what happens to you while you are still alive, so the phrase “karma’s a b*tch” when used in the context of minor inconveniences in life is, in fact, inaccurate.

fourth: who the fuck told y’all we worship cows? while it’s true we consider cows sacred, and many denominations of hinduism don’t eat beef because of this, you won’t find anyone treating cows themselves like literal gods. that just isn’t a thing.

fifth: no, you cannot randomly call yourself hindu because you think “third eyes” and “chakras” and whatever exotified bullshit you ran into in yoga class is sooooo trendy. some people do convert to hinduism – personally i know a few hindu converts who aren’t of south asian descent, and they are some of the most respectful and religious people i have met – but please, don’t pick and choose the parts of a religion that you think are cool and exotic. and for the love of the gods, don’t culturally appropriate. recognise that hinduism has a deep and interconnected history with south asian culture, and that not all of it is your place to take part in.

sixth: a bindi/bottu/tikka/tip is not just a “forehead decoration,” it is a symbol of shakti, power, and corresponds with the mythos behind chakras (pronounced [chakra] not [CHAKra]). do your fucking homework before you misuse a powerful symbol of south asian culture and don’t try to tell us that we’re overreacting.

seventh: not all hindus are peaceful, and hindu extremists do exist! hindus have a long history of islamophobia, for one, which has resulted in violence, and also discrimination against people of the sikh faith (see: indira gandhi, anti-sikh riots of 1984). also, the hindu nationalist (or hindutva) movement is as violent as any other extremist group you’d encounter. most hindus are generally pretty chill and don’t agree with these extremists’ views but even so, it’s dangerous to assume every hindu is gentle, because that overlooks and minimises the actions of these groups.

eighth: hinduism itself has no problems with the LGBT+ community. in fact many hindu deities have feminine/masculine/non-human forms (i.e.: vishnu and mohini,) and can therefore be interpreted as nb/genderfluid. there are also a few myths that challenge conventional heteronormativity.